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Curtiss-Wright SNC-1 Curtiss-Wright SNC-1

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airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | aviation | aviation | falcon | falcon | usnavy | usnavy | usn | usn | militaryaviation | militaryaviation | navalaviation | navalaviation | unitedstatesnavy | unitedstatesnavy | snc | snc | 6291 | 6291 | curtisswright | curtisswright | snc1 | snc1 | cw22 | cw22 | wrightwhirlwind | wrightwhirlwind | r975 | r975 | curtisswrightcorporation | curtisswrightcorporation | curtisswrightcw22 | curtisswrightcw22 | snc1falcon | snc1falcon | curtisswrightsnc1falcon | curtisswrightsnc1falcon | curtissfalcon | curtissfalcon | curtisssnc | curtisssnc | curtisssncfalcon | curtisssncfalcon | wrightr975 | wrightr975 | wrightr975whirlwind | wrightr975whirlwind | sncfalcon | sncfalcon | r975whirlwind | r975whirlwind | curtisswrightsncfalcon | curtisswrightsncfalcon | curtisswrightfalcon | curtisswrightfalcon | curtisswrightsnc | curtisswrightsnc | curtisswrightsnc1 | curtisswrightsnc1 | curtisswrightcw22n | curtisswrightcw22n | cw22n | cw22n | curtisscw22n | curtisscw22n | curtisscw22 | curtisscw22 | buno6291 | buno6291

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT) 17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | norms of justice | interstate | interstate | political justice | political justice | economic justice | economic justice | human rights | human rights | skepticism about global justice | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | global democracy | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | rights to control borders | Kant | Kant | Habermas | Habermas | Rawls | Rawls | Sen | Sen | Beitz | Beitz | Nussbaum | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 17.000 | 24.611 | 24.611

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moving Targets: Reputational Risk, Rights and Accountability in Punishment

Description

Professor Kelly Hannah-Moffat, University of Toronto, gives a talk on human rights within the Canadian Prison system Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

crime | prison | s prisons | human rights | prisoner rights | s prisons | human rights | prisoner rights | 2014-05-23

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Moving Targets: Reputational Risk, Rights and Accountability in Punishment

Description

Professor Kelly Hannah-Moffat, University of Toronto, gives a talk on human rights within the Canadian Prison system Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

crime | prison | s prisons | human rights | prisoner rights | s prisons | human rights | prisoner rights | 2014-05-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT) 21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed. This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Subjects

21H.225 | 21H.225 | WGS.161 | WGS.161 | gender studies | gender studies | suffrage | suffrage | women's rights | women's rights | feminism | feminism | sexual harrassment | sexual harrassment | law | law | women's rights movement | women's rights movement | affirmative action | affirmative action | sexual liberation | sexual liberation | miscegination laws | miscegination laws | social movements | social movements | SP.607J | SP.607J | WMN.607J | WMN.607J | SP.607 | SP.607 | WMN.607 | WMN.607

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | international relations | international relations | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT) 11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience (MIT)

Description

This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies. This course studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. The class uses case studies to explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current areas such as gender, race, labor, trade, environment, and human rights. Finally, it introduces the theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies.

Subjects

law | law | social movements | social movements | public policy | public policy | comparative | comparative | international | international | Occupy Wall Street | Occupy Wall Street | gender | gender | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | social justice | social justice | human rights | human rights | feminism | feminism | women's rights | women's rights | India | India | United States | United States | labor | labor | economics | economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Future of Human Rights

Description

Part of the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Timothy Endicott, Murray Hunt and Sandra Fredman discuss the future of human rights, looking at the human rights constitution, its critics and how to uphold human rights. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | 2010-09-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (3): The Question of Legal Rights for Animals

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. The instability in human attitudes about the moral standing of animals is reflected in our laws. Animal welfare laws offer animals some legal protections, but those protections do not take the form of animal rights. Partly as a consequence, these laws are often ineffective. Organizations with an interest in activities that are harmful to animals, such as factory farms or experimental laboratories, often manage to get their own activities exempt from the restrictions or the animals they deal with exempt from the protections. On the other hand, many people find Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (2): The Moral Standing of Animals

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Human attitudes towards the other animals exhibit a curious instability. Nearly everyone thinks we have some obligations with respect to the other animals ? that whenever possible, we should treat them ?humanely.? Yet human beings have traditionally regarded nearly any reason we might have for overriding this obligation, short of malicious enjoyment of their suffering, as a sufficient reason. We kill or hurt animals in order to eat them, in order to make useful or desirable products out of them, because we can learn from experimenting on them, because t Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (1): Animals, Human Beings, and Persons

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Legitimate differences in the ways we treat animals, human beings, and other entities that have moral or legal rights ? legal persons ? must be based on the differences between them. Philosophers have traditionally cited a variety of factors ? rationality, sentience, having interests ? as morally significant. In this lecture I discuss what the morally relevant similarities and differences between these kinds of entities might be. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights of animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights of animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

supreme court | supreme court | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT)

Description

Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré, Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré,

Subjects

developing world | developing world | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | industrialization | industrialization | economic development | economic development | human rights | human rights | global human rights | global human rights | global issues | global issues | global development | global development | literary perspective | literary perspective | Jamaica Kincaid | Jamaica Kincaid | JG Ballard | JG Ballard | John le Carre | John le Carre | Rohinton Mistry | Rohinton Mistry | World Bank | World Bank | National Geographic | National Geographic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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African American and white voters voting together in 1956 - Tallahassee African American and white voters voting together in 1956 - Tallahassee

Description

Subjects

florida | florida | tallahassee | tallahassee | voters | voters | civilrights | civilrights | politicalrights | politicalrights | elections | elections | voting | voting | politics | politics | suffrage | suffrage

License

No known copyright restrictions

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The Future of Human Rights

Description

Part of the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Timothy Endicott, Murray Hunt and Sandra Fredman discuss the future of human rights, looking at the human rights constitution, its critics and how to uphold human rights. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | human rights | politics | human rights constitution | alumni | 2010-09-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT) 21H.912 The World Since 1492 (MIT)

Description

This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world. This class offers a look into the last five hundred years of world history. Rather than attempt an exhaustive chronology of everything that has occurred on the globe since 1492 - an impossible task for a lifetime, let alone a single semester - we will be focusing on certain geographic areas at specific times, in order to highlight a particular historical problem or to examine the roots of processes that have had an enormous impact on the contemporary world.

Subjects

world | world | history | history | 1492 | 1492 | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | political | political | social | social | revolution | revolution | industrialization | industrialization | consumer society | consumer society | transatlantic contacts | transatlantic contacts | Columbus | Columbus | New World | New World | racism | racism | slavery | slavery | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | French revolution | French revolution | human rights | human rights | Haiti | Haiti | Communist Manifesto | Communist Manifesto | Das Capital | Das Capital | Africa | Africa | Opium Wars | Opium Wars | Far East | Far East | Communism | Communism | Cold War | Cold War | globalization | globalization | French revolution | human rights | French revolution | human rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.922 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. IAP Design Seminar (MIT) 17.922 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. IAP Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This seminar facilitates the design and construction of installations and other community projects in conjunction with and beyond MIT's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. During the first half of the class, MIT and Wellesley students develop in-depth understanding of the history of US racial issues as well as past and present domestic and international political struggles. In the second half, the students work as a group to complete the installations and projects which serve as models for connecting academics with real life problems and struggle.This seminar is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This seminar facilitates the design and construction of installations and other community projects in conjunction with and beyond MIT's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. During the first half of the class, MIT and Wellesley students develop in-depth understanding of the history of US racial issues as well as past and present domestic and international political struggles. In the second half, the students work as a group to complete the installations and projects which serve as models for connecting academics with real life problems and struggle.This seminar is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | memorial | memorial | civil rights | civil rights | design | design | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | gender | gender | sex | sex | class | class | Lydia Cacho | Lydia Cacho | Nelson Mandela | Nelson Mandela | Malcolm X | Malcolm X | art | art | installation | installation | human rights | human rights | identity | identity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

Supreme Court | Supreme Court | Congress | Congress | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights | federalism | federalism | separation of powers | separation of powers | supreme court cases | supreme court cases | marbury | marbury | madison | madison | mccullough | mccullough | maryland | maryland | bush | bush | gore | gore | dred scott | dred scott | sanford | sanford | brown | brown | board of education | board of education | equal protection of the laws | equal protection of the laws | immigration | immigration | welfare | welfare | Eighth Amendment | Eighth Amendment | First Amendment | First Amendment | poverty | poverty | criminal procedure | criminal procedure | World War II | World War II | Korean War | Korean War | post 9/11 america | post 9/11 america | judicial review | judicial review | religion | religion | citizenship | citizenship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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