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15.997 Practice of Finance: Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT) 15.997 Practice of Finance: Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course in how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm—any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Most related courses focus on the extensive taxonomy of instruments and the complex models developed to price them, and on ways to exploit mispricing. While this course will make use of some of these pricing models, the focus is on how corporations use the insights and models to improve their operations, to increase the value of their real assets, or to create the financi This is a course in how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm—any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Most related courses focus on the extensive taxonomy of instruments and the complex models developed to price them, and on ways to exploit mispricing. While this course will make use of some of these pricing models, the focus is on how corporations use the insights and models to improve their operations, to increase the value of their real assets, or to create the financi

Subjects

risk | risk | corporate finance | corporate finance | risk management | risk management | hedging | hedging | derivatives | derivatives | trading operations | trading operations | pricing risk | pricing risk | liability management | liability management | financial policy | financial policy | valuation | valuation | discounted cash flow | discounted cash flow | asset management | asset management | transaction hedging | transaction hedging | market volatility | market volatility | foreign currency derivatives | foreign currency derivatives | interest rate risk | interest rate risk | liability structure | liability structure | strategic management | strategic management | Modigliani-Miller Theory of hedging | Modigliani-Miller Theory of hedging | dynamic models | dynamic models | monte carlo simulation | monte carlo simulation | random walk model | random walk model | binomial tree | binomial tree | mispricing | mispricing | risk neutral pricing | risk neutral pricing

License

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation | radiation | radioactivity | radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling | cooling | seabrook | seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium

License

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | LWR | LWR | light water reactor | light water reactor | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation radioactivity | radiation radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling Seabrook | cooling Seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium | economics of nuclear power | economics of nuclear power | materials slection | materials slection | IRIS | IRIS | materials selection | materials selection

License

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22.38 Probability And Its Applications To Reliability, Quality Control, And Risk Assessment (MIT) 22.38 Probability And Its Applications To Reliability, Quality Control, And Risk Assessment (MIT)

Description

This course covers interpretations of the concept of probability. Topics include basic probability rules; random variables and distribution functions; functions of random variables; and applications to quality control and the reliability assessment of mechanical/electrical components, as well as simple structures and redundant systems. The course also considers elements of statistics; Bayesian methods in engineering; methods for reliability and risk assessment of complex systems (event-tree and fault-tree analysis, common-cause failures, human reliability models); uncertainty propagation in complex systems (Monte Carlo methods, Latin Hypercube Sampling); and an introduction to Markov models. Examples and applications are drawn from nuclear and other industries, waste repositories, and mech This course covers interpretations of the concept of probability. Topics include basic probability rules; random variables and distribution functions; functions of random variables; and applications to quality control and the reliability assessment of mechanical/electrical components, as well as simple structures and redundant systems. The course also considers elements of statistics; Bayesian methods in engineering; methods for reliability and risk assessment of complex systems (event-tree and fault-tree analysis, common-cause failures, human reliability models); uncertainty propagation in complex systems (Monte Carlo methods, Latin Hypercube Sampling); and an introduction to Markov models. Examples and applications are drawn from nuclear and other industries, waste repositories, and mech

Subjects

risk | risk | uncertainty | uncertainty | nuclear accident | nuclear accident | disaster | disaster | meltdown | meltdown | probability | probability | risk assessment | risk assessment | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | NUREG-1150 | NUREG-1150 | WASH-1400 | WASH-1400 | failure | failure | applied probability | applied probability | applied statistics | applied statistics | system performance | system performance | MTBF | MTBF | decision | decision | hazard | hazard | fault tree analysis | fault tree analysis | event tree analysis | event tree analysis

License

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ESD.72 Engineering Risk-Benefit Analysis (MIT) ESD.72 Engineering Risk-Benefit Analysis (MIT)

Description

ERBA (ESD.72) emphasizes three methodologies - reliability and probabilistic risk assessment (RPRA), decision analysis (DA), and cost-benefit analysis (CBA). In this class, the issues of interest are: the risks associated with large engineering projects such as nuclear power reactors, the International Space Station, and critical infrastructures; the development of new products; the design of processes and operations with environmental externalities; and infrastructure renewal projects. ERBA (ESD.72) emphasizes three methodologies - reliability and probabilistic risk assessment (RPRA), decision analysis (DA), and cost-benefit analysis (CBA). In this class, the issues of interest are: the risks associated with large engineering projects such as nuclear power reactors, the International Space Station, and critical infrastructures; the development of new products; the design of processes and operations with environmental externalities; and infrastructure renewal projects.

Subjects

risk analysis | risk analysis | decision analysis | decision analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | remedial action alternative | remedial action alternative | probability | probability | utility functions | utility functions | environmental remediation | environmental remediation | risk aversion | risk aversion | multistage decision models | multistage decision models | axioms of rational behavior | axioms of rational behavior | design decisions | design decisions | fault-tolerant design | fault-tolerant design | risk management | risk management

License

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20.102 Macroepidemiology (BE.102) (MIT) 20.102 Macroepidemiology (BE.102) (MIT)

Description

This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors.

Subjects

Disease | Disease | mortality | mortality | cancer | cancer | cerebrovascular disease | cerebrovascular disease | diabetes | diabetes | infectious disease | infectious disease | risk | risk | inherited risk | inherited risk | environmental risk | environmental risk | population genetics | population genetics | mutation | mutation | public health | public health | malignancy | malignancy | statistics | statistics

License

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20.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (BE.104J) (MIT) 20.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (BE.104J) (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest. This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

Subjects

biostatistics | biostatistics | risk | risk | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk factor | risk factor | environmental agent | environmental agent | environetics | environetics | cause and effect | cause and effect | pollution | pollution | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | toxic | toxic | genetics | genetics | disease | disease | health | health | EPA | EPA | metabolism | metabolism | endocrine | endocrine | immunity | immunity | uncertainty | uncertainty | mortality | mortality | death rate | death rate | prediction | prediction | 20.104 | 20.104 | 1.081 | 1.081 | ESD.053 | ESD.053 | BE.104J | BE.104J | BE.104 | BE.104

License

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1.040 Project Management (MIT) 1.040 Project Management (MIT)

Description

1.040 Project Management focuses on the management and implementation of construction projects, primarily infrastructure projects. A project refers to a temporary piece of work undertaken to create a unique product or service. Whereas operations are continuous and repeating, projects are finite and have an end date. Projects bring form or function to ideas or need. Some notable projects include the Manhattan Project (developing the first nuclear weapon); the Human Genome Project (mapping the human genome); and the Central Artery Project (Boston's "Big Dig"). The field of project management deals with the planning, execution, and controlling of projects. The course is divided into three parts: Part 1: project finance Part 2: project evaluation Part 3: project organization This co 1.040 Project Management focuses on the management and implementation of construction projects, primarily infrastructure projects. A project refers to a temporary piece of work undertaken to create a unique product or service. Whereas operations are continuous and repeating, projects are finite and have an end date. Projects bring form or function to ideas or need. Some notable projects include the Manhattan Project (developing the first nuclear weapon); the Human Genome Project (mapping the human genome); and the Central Artery Project (Boston's "Big Dig"). The field of project management deals with the planning, execution, and controlling of projects. The course is divided into three parts: Part 1: project finance Part 2: project evaluation Part 3: project organization This co

Subjects

1.401 | 1.401 | ESD.018 | ESD.018 | project management | project management | public-private partnership | public-private partnership | infrastructure | infrastructure | construction finance | construction finance | enterprise project management | enterprise project management | cost estimation | cost estimation | portfolio project management | portfolio project management | risk management | risk management | risk analysis | risk analysis | project control | project control | project organization | project organization | private finance initiative | private finance initiative | allocation | allocation | risk management process | risk management process | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | project organization and contracts | project organization and contracts | procurement | procurement

License

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11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT) 11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT)

Description

In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po

Subjects

natural disaster | natural disaster | environment | environment | risk | risk | risk management | risk management | vulnerability | vulnerability | resilience | resilience | global warming | global warming | rebuilding | rebuilding | risk reduction | risk reduction | nature | nature | hazard | hazard | hazard reduction | hazard reduction | disaster policy | disaster policy | agenda setting | agenda setting | community vulnerability | community vulnerability | climate instability | climate instability | public trust | public trust | reflective practice | reflective practice | resilient cities | resilient cities

License

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BE.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (MIT) BE.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest. This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

Subjects

biostatistics | biostatistics | risk | risk | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk factor | risk factor | environmental agent | environmental agent | environetics | environetics | cause and effect | cause and effect | pollution | pollution | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | toxic | toxic | genetics | genetics | disease | disease | health | health | EPA | EPA | metabolism | metabolism | endocrine | endocrine | immunity | immunity | uncertainty | uncertainty | mortality | mortality | death rate | death rate | prediction | prediction

License

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BE.102 Macroepidemiology (MIT) BE.102 Macroepidemiology (MIT)

Description

This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. Technical RequirementsJava® plug-in software is required to run the Java® files found on this course site. Microsoft® Excel s This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. Technical RequirementsJava® plug-in software is required to run the Java® files found on this course site. Microsoft® Excel s

Subjects

Disease | Disease | mortality | mortality | cancer | cancer | cerebrovascular disease | cerebrovascular disease | diabetes | diabetes | infectious disease | infectious disease | risk | risk | inherited risk | inherited risk | environmental risk | environmental risk | population genetics | population genetics | mutation | mutation | public health | public health | malignancy | malignancy | statistics | statistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.997 Practice of Finance: Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course in how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm—any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Most related courses focus on the extensive taxonomy of instruments and the complex models developed to price them, and on ways to exploit mispricing. While this course will make use of some of these pricing models, the focus is on how corporations use the insights and models to improve their operations, to increase the value of their real assets, or to create the financi

Subjects

risk | corporate finance | risk management | hedging | derivatives | trading operations | pricing risk | liability management | financial policy | valuation | discounted cash flow | asset management | transaction hedging | market volatility | foreign currency derivatives | interest rate risk | liability structure | strategic management | Modigliani-Miller Theory of hedging | dynamic models | monte carlo simulation | random walk model | binomial tree | mispricing | risk neutral pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This course covers models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Applications include risk sharing and financial markets; contracts and information economics; village economies and national development; models with money and credit; trade, spatial economics and differentiated commodities. This course covers models of individual decision-making under certainty and uncertainty. Applications include risk sharing and financial markets; contracts and information economics; village economies and national development; models with money and credit; trade, spatial economics and differentiated commodities.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | rationalizability | rationalizability | game theory | game theory | behavioral economics | behavioral economics | choice | choice | preference | preference | risk | risk | risk-aversion | risk-aversion | Expected Utility Theory | Expected Utility Theory | Prospect Theory | Prospect Theory | decision making | decision making | decision theory | decision theory

License

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16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. 16.885J offers a holistic view of the aircraft as a system, covering: basic systems engineering; cost and weight estimation; basic aircraft performance; safety and reliability; lifecycle topics; aircraft subsystems; risk analysis and management; and system realization. Small student teams retrospectively analyze an existing aircraft covering: key design drivers and decisions; aircraft attributes and subsystems; and operational experience. Oral and written versions of the case study are delivered. For the Fall 2005 term, the class focuses on a systems engineering analysis of the Space Shuttle. It offers study of both design and operations of the shuttle, with frequent lectures by outside experts. Students choose specific s Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. 16.885J offers a holistic view of the aircraft as a system, covering: basic systems engineering; cost and weight estimation; basic aircraft performance; safety and reliability; lifecycle topics; aircraft subsystems; risk analysis and management; and system realization. Small student teams retrospectively analyze an existing aircraft covering: key design drivers and decisions; aircraft attributes and subsystems; and operational experience. Oral and written versions of the case study are delivered. For the Fall 2005 term, the class focuses on a systems engineering analysis of the Space Shuttle. It offers study of both design and operations of the shuttle, with frequent lectures by outside experts. Students choose specific s

Subjects

16.885 | 16.885 | ESD.35 | ESD.35 | aircraft systems | aircraft systems | aircraft systems engineering | aircraft systems engineering | lifecycle | lifecycle | cost estimation | cost estimation | weight estimation | weight estimation | aircraft performance | aircraft performance | aircraft safety | aircraft safety | aircraft reliability | aircraft reliability | subsystems | subsystems | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | system realization | system realization | retrospective analysis | retrospective analysis | key design drivers | key design drivers | design drivers | design drivers | design decisions | design decisions | aircraft attributes | aircraft attributes | operational experience | operational experience | case study | case study | case studies | case studies | air transportation system | air transportation system | air defense system | air defense system | systems engineering | systems engineering | interface management | interface management | interface verification | interface verification | interface validation | interface validation | subsystem architecture | subsystem architecture | performance issues | performance issues | design closure | design closure | complex systems | complex systems | space shuttle | space shuttle | space systems | space systems | NASA | NASA | sound barrier | sound barrier | ascent | ascent | aeronautics | aeronautics | liftoff | liftoff | takeoff | takeoff

License

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

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15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT) 15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control. This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control.

Subjects

advanced corporate risk management | advanced corporate risk management | derivatives | futures and options | derivatives | futures and options | financial engineering | financial engineering | corporations | corporations | risk management | risk management | pricing models | pricing models | operations | operations | real assets | real assets | core strategy | core strategy | trading operations | trading operations | contracts | contracts | hedging | hedging | corporate governance | corporate governance | shareholders | shareholders | valuation | valuation | liability management | liability management

License

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11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT) 11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT)

Description

There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites. There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites.

Subjects

brownfields | brownfields | environmental policy | environmental policy | environmental practice | environmental practice | planning | planning | urban redevelopment | urban redevelopment | market forces | market forces | law and liability | law and liability | environmental justice | environmental justice | under-served communities | under-served communities | environmental technology | environmental technology | risk assessment | risk assessment | economics | economics | risk management | risk management | community development corporations | community development corporations | politics | politics | Lynn | MA | Lynn | MA

License

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11.484 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.484 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of those projects. The course gives special consideration to cases in the developing world. Students will engage in a critical analysis of these tools and their role in the political economy of international development. The course will cover topics such as alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Introductory micro-economics is a pre-requisite for this course. This course covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of those projects. The course gives special consideration to cases in the developing world. Students will engage in a critical analysis of these tools and their role in the political economy of international development. The course will cover topics such as alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Introductory micro-economics is a pre-requisite for this course.

Subjects

project evaluation | project evaluation | politics | politics | project cycle | project cycle | development planning | development planning | financing | financing | investment | investment | cash flow | cash flow | discounting | discounting | alternative investment | alternative investment | forecasting | forecasting | inflation | inflation | risk management | risk management | risk analysis | risk analysis | markets | markets | market distortin | market distortin | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | taxation | taxation | monopoly | monopoly | social-distributive project appraisal | social-distributive project appraisal | institutions | institutions | rational analysis | rational analysis

License

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ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT) ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g

Subjects

Politics | Politics | decision making | decision making | negotiation | negotiation | planning | planning | wedge game | wedge game | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | NRC | NRC | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | government | government | public policy | public policy | globalization | globalization | science | science | EPA | EPA | NSF | NSF | transportation | transportation | urban planning | urban planning | standards | standards | risk | risk | risk assessment | risk assessment | engineering | engineering | energy | energy | internet | internet | network neutrality | network neutrality | regulation | regulation | security | security | 9/11 | 9/11 | September 11 | September 11 | terrorism | terrorism | defense | defense | tradeoff | tradeoff

License

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1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT) 1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject.

Subjects

professional engineer | professional engineer | team-building skills | team-building skills | lectures | lectures | team workshops | team workshops | seminars | seminars | written communication | written communication | oral communication | oral communication | job placement skills | job placement skills | trends in engineering | trends in engineering | trends in construction industry | trends in construction industry | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | proposal preparation | proposal preparation | request for proposal | request for proposal | small business | small business | professional registration | professional registration | project evaluation | project evaluation | project management | project management | liability | liability | professional ethics | professional ethics | negotiation | negotiation

License

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18.S096 Topics in Mathematics with Applications in Finance (MIT) 18.S096 Topics in Mathematics with Applications in Finance (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The purpose of the class is to expose undergraduate and graduate students to the mathematical concepts and techniques used in the financial industry. Mathematics lectures are mixed with lectures illustrating the corresponding application in the financial industry. MIT mathematicians teach the mathematics part while industry professionals give the lectures on applications in finance. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The purpose of the class is to expose undergraduate and graduate students to the mathematical concepts and techniques used in the financial industry. Mathematics lectures are mixed with lectures illustrating the corresponding application in the financial industry. MIT mathematicians teach the mathematics part while industry professionals give the lectures on applications in finance.

Subjects

Financial terms | Financial terms | Value at Risk Models | Value at Risk Models | Volatility Modeling | Volatility Modeling | Regularized pricing | Regularized pricing | Risk Models | Risk Models | Risk analysis | Risk analysis | commodity models | commodity models | portfolio theory | portfolio theory | Ito calculus | Ito calculus | Black-Scholes formula | Black-Scholes formula | risk neutral valuation | risk neutral valuation | option pricing | option pricing | Quanto credit hedging | Quanto credit hedging | Ross recovery theorem | Ross recovery theorem | counterparty credit risk | counterparty credit risk

License

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

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