Searching for rules : 95 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4

21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT) 24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT)

Description

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments. 24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Subjects

fundamental concepts | fundamental concepts | phonological theory | phonological theory | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | articulatory phonetics | articulatory phonetics | acoustic phonetics | acoustic phonetics | feature systems | feature systems | underlying representations | underlying representations | underspecification | underspecification | phonological rules | phonological rules | phonological derivations | phonological derivations | syllable structure | syllable structure | accentual systems | accentual systems | morphology-phonology interface | morphology-phonology interface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Machine Learning I Machine Learning I

Description

The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning The main goals of this course are: to introduce the basic concepts of Machine Learning and Big Data Machine Learning; to describe the main areas, techniques, and processes in Machine Learning; to introduce some of the main tools in (Big Data) Machine Learning

Subjects

Nearest neighbours | Nearest neighbours | Models for regression | Models for regression | MLLIB | MLLIB | Gradient Boosting | Gradient Boosting | Bagging | Bagging | Hyper-parameter optimization | Hyper-parameter optimization | Pyspark | Pyspark | Large scale machine learning | Large scale machine learning | Boosting | Boosting | Spark | Spark | 2016 | 2016 | Random Forests | Random Forests | Machine learning | Machine learning | Decision / regression trees and rules | Decision / regression trees and rules | Feature selection | Feature selection | Model evaluation | Model evaluation | Feature transformation | Feature transformation | ML | ML | Basic pipeline | Basic pipeline | Models for classification | Models for classification | MapReduce | MapReduce | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | C. Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial | Dimensionality reduction | Dimensionality reduction

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.uc3m.es/ocwuniversia/rss_all

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT) 18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This introductory calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This introductory calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications.

Subjects

differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | limits | limits | continuity | continuity | differentiation rules | differentiation rules | extremum problems | extremum problems | definite and indefinite integration | definite and indefinite integration | fundamental theorem of calculus | fundamental theorem of calculus | elementary | elementary | techniques of integration | techniques of integration | approximation of definite integrals | approximation of definite integrals | improper integrals | improper integrals | l'H?pital's rule | l'H?pital's rule

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.231 Ethics (MIT) 24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why? This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | ethics | euthyphro | euthyphro | Plato | Plato | goodness | goodness | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | David Brink | cognitivism | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | observation | morality | morality | moral relativism | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | David Lyons | incoherence | incoherence | ethical relativism | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | philosophy | Bernard Williams | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | James Lenman | consequentialism | consequentialism | cluelessness | cluelessness | Peter Singer | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | John Rawls | rules | rules | Thomas Nagel | Thomas Nagel | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | moral worth | Susan Wolf | Susan Wolf | moral saints | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | Peter van Inwagen | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | moral luck | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

5.73 Introductory Quantum Mechanics I (MIT) 5.73 Introductory Quantum Mechanics I (MIT)

Description

5.73 covers fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics: wave properties, uncertainty principles, Schrödinger equation, and operator and matrix methods. Basic applications of the following are discussed: one-dimensional potentials (harmonic oscillator), three-dimensional centrosymmetric potentials (hydrogen atom), and angular momentum and spin. The course also examines approximation methods: variational principle and perturbation theory. 5.73 covers fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics: wave properties, uncertainty principles, Schrödinger equation, and operator and matrix methods. Basic applications of the following are discussed: one-dimensional potentials (harmonic oscillator), three-dimensional centrosymmetric potentials (hydrogen atom), and angular momentum and spin. The course also examines approximation methods: variational principle and perturbation theory.

Subjects

quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | NMR | NMR | kinetic isotope effects | kinetic isotope effects | hilbert space | hilbert space | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | particle in a box | particle in a box | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | angular momentum | angular momentum | Wigner-Eckart theorem | Wigner-Eckart theorem | hydrogen atom | hydrogen atom | spin-orbit interaction | spin-orbit interaction | Born Oppenheimer approximation | Born Oppenheimer approximation | Hartree-Fock | Hartree-Fock | Slater-Condon rules | Slater-Condon rules

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-5.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT) 18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT)

Description

This introductory calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications. This introductory calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications.

Subjects

differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | limits | limits | continuity | continuity | differentiation rules | differentiation rules | extremum problems | extremum problems | definite and indefinite integration | definite and indefinite integration | fundamental theorem of calculus | fundamental theorem of calculus | elementary | elementary | techniques of integration | techniques of integration | approximation of definite integrals | approximation of definite integrals | improper integrals | improper integrals | l'H?pital's rule | l'H?pital's rule

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Intersection Theory on Moduli Spaces (MIT) 18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Intersection Theory on Moduli Spaces (MIT)

Description

The topics for this course vary each semester. This semester, the course aims to introduce techniques for studying intersection theory on moduli spaces. In particular, it covers the geometry of homogeneous varieties, the Deligne-Mumford moduli spaces of stable curves and the Kontsevich moduli spaces of stable maps using intersection theory. The topics for this course vary each semester. This semester, the course aims to introduce techniques for studying intersection theory on moduli spaces. In particular, it covers the geometry of homogeneous varieties, the Deligne-Mumford moduli spaces of stable curves and the Kontsevich moduli spaces of stable maps using intersection theory.

Subjects

intersection theory | intersection theory | moduli spaces | moduli spaces | geometry of homogeneous varieties | geometry of homogeneous varieties | Deligne-Mumford moduli spaces | Deligne-Mumford moduli spaces | stable curves | stable curves | Kontsevich moduli spaces | Kontsevich moduli spaces | stable maps | stable maps | Littlewood-Richardson rules | Littlewood-Richardson rules | Grassmannians | Grassmannians | divisor theory | divisor theory | cohomology | cohomology | Brill-Noether theory | Brill-Noether theory | limit linear series | limit linear series | ample cones | ample cones | effective cones | effective cones | Gromov-Witten invariants | Gromov-Witten invariants | simple homogeneous varieties | simple homogeneous varieties

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Business law legislation

Description

A PowerPoint presentation on business law legislation with a focus on legislation,interpretation and the rules of language. This presentation is aimed at degree level students

Subjects

law | civil law | criminal law | courts | sanctions | punishment | religioun | morality | magistrates | crown court | judges | tax | corporations | business law | justice | magistrates court | rules | rule of law | breach of contract | values | institution | sale of goods | intellectual property | copyright | equity | negotiation | lecture | case law | contract law | stare decisis | prezi | interpretation | rules of language | ukoer | brome | oer | ip | Law | M000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Business law legislation handout

Description

A resource for degree level law students which features business law legislation, interpretation and human rights

Subjects

law | civil law | criminal law | courts | sanctions | punishment | religioun | morality | magistrates | crown court | judges | tax | corporations | business law | justice | magistrates court | rules | rule of law | breach of contract | values | institution | sale of goods | intellectual property | copyright | equity | negotiation | lecture | case law | contract law | stare decisis | prezi | interpretation | rules of language | ukoer | brome | oer | ip | Law | M000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to contract law

Description

This online tutorial introduces the main concepts of contract law within the context of business

Subjects

law | civil law | criminal law | courts | sanctions | punishment | religioun | morality | magistrates | crown court | judges | tax | corporations | business law | justice | magistrates court | rules | rule of law | breach of contract | values | institution | sale of goods | intellectual property | copyright | equity | negotiation | lecture | case law | contract law | stare decisis | prezi | interpretation | rules of language | ukoer | brome | oer | ip | Law | M000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ESD.70J Engineering Economy Module (MIT) ESD.70J Engineering Economy Module (MIT)

Description

This intensive micro-subject provides the necessary skills in Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet modeling for ESD.71 – Engineering Systems Analysis for Design. Its purpose is to bring entering students up to speed on some of the advanced techniques that we routinely use in analysis. It is motivated by our experience that many students only have an introductory knowledge of Excel, and thus waste a lot of time thrashing about unproductively. Many people think they know Excel, but overlook many efficient tools – such as Data Table and Goal Seek. It is also useful for a variety of other subjects.NoteThis MIT OpenCourseWare site is based on the materials from Professor de Neufville's ESD.70J Web site. This intensive micro-subject provides the necessary skills in Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet modeling for ESD.71 – Engineering Systems Analysis for Design. Its purpose is to bring entering students up to speed on some of the advanced techniques that we routinely use in analysis. It is motivated by our experience that many students only have an introductory knowledge of Excel, and thus waste a lot of time thrashing about unproductively. Many people think they know Excel, but overlook many efficient tools – such as Data Table and Goal Seek. It is also useful for a variety of other subjects.NoteThis MIT OpenCourseWare site is based on the materials from Professor de Neufville's ESD.70J Web site.

Subjects

excel | excel | spreadsheet | spreadsheet | modeling | modeling | dynamic modeling | dynamic modeling | analysis | analysis | data table | data table | goal seek | goal seek | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | simulation | simulation | random number generator | random number generator | counting | counting | modeling uncertainties | modeling uncertainties | random variables | random variables | statistical package | statistical package | flexibility | flexibility | contingency rules | contingency rules | excel solver | excel solver | solver | solver

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course provides practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-digital games. Students cover the texts, tools, references and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role–playing games. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course provides practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-digital games. Students cover the texts, tools, references and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role–playing games. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subjects

games | games | puzzles | puzzles | narrative | narrative | playtestin | playtestin | chance | chance | competition | competition | strategy | strategy | rules | rules | gambling | gambling | emergence | emergence | progression | progression | randomness | randomness | cooperation | cooperation | iterative design | iterative design | prototyping | prototyping | game mechanics | game mechanics | aesthetics | aesthetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lecture 2: Iterative Design Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | rules | strategy | strategy | iterative design | iterative design | playtesting | playtesting | core mechanic | core mechanic | core dynamic | core dynamic | game design tools | game design tools | emergent behavior | emergent behavior | brainstorming | brainstorming | user feedback | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.912 Technology Strategy (MIT) 15.912 Technology Strategy (MIT)

Description

This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities. This is not a course in how to manage product or process development. The main focus is on the acquisition of a set of powerful analytical tools which are critical for the development of a technology strategy as an integral part of business strategy. These tools can provide the framework for deciding which technologies to invest in, how to structure those investments and how to anticipate and respond to the behavior of competitors, suppliers, a This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities. This is not a course in how to manage product or process development. The main focus is on the acquisition of a set of powerful analytical tools which are critical for the development of a technology strategy as an integral part of business strategy. These tools can provide the framework for deciding which technologies to invest in, how to structure those investments and how to anticipate and respond to the behavior of competitors, suppliers, a

Subjects

disruptive technology | disruptive technology | strategy | strategy | models | models | analysis | analysis | competition | competition | change | change | organizational competence | organizational competence | vertical integration | vertical integration | S-curves | S-curves | organizational strategy | organizational strategy | market evolution | market evolution | market dynamics | market dynamics | simple rules | simple rules | worse before better | worse before better | standards | standards | tipping | tipping | complementary assets | complementary assets | capturing value | capturing value | value chain | value chain | network effects | network effects | market share | market share | innovation | innovation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games. An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subjects

a | a | games | games | narrative | narrative | playtesting | playtesting | student work | student work | student notes | student notes | chance | chance | competition | competition | information | information | probability | probability | strategy | strategy | theory | theory | symbolism | symbolism | rules | rules | gambling | gambling | emergence | emergence | progression | progression | randomness | randomness | cooperation | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ESD.70J Engineering Economy Module (MIT) ESD.70J Engineering Economy Module (MIT)

Description

This intensive micro-subject provides the necessary skills in Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet modeling for ESD.71 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design. Its purpose is to bring entering students up to speed on some of the advanced techniques that we routinely use in analysis. It is motivated by our experience that many students only have an introductory knowledge of Excel, and thus waste a lot of time thrashing about unproductively. Many people think they know Excel, but overlook many efficient tools, such as Data Table and Goal Seek. It is also useful for a variety of other subjects. This intensive micro-subject provides the necessary skills in Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet modeling for ESD.71 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design. Its purpose is to bring entering students up to speed on some of the advanced techniques that we routinely use in analysis. It is motivated by our experience that many students only have an introductory knowledge of Excel, and thus waste a lot of time thrashing about unproductively. Many people think they know Excel, but overlook many efficient tools, such as Data Table and Goal Seek. It is also useful for a variety of other subjects.

Subjects

ESD.70 | ESD.70 | 1.145 | 1.145 | excel | excel | spreadsheet | spreadsheet | modeling | modeling | dynamic modeling | dynamic modeling | analysis | analysis | data table | data table | goal seek | goal seek | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | simulation | simulation | random number generator | random number generator | counting | counting | modeling uncertainties | modeling uncertainties | random variables | random variables | statistical package | statistical package | flexibility | flexibility | contingency rules | contingency rules | excel solver | excel solver | solver | solver

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ESD.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT) 18.01 Single Variable Calculus (MIT)

Description

This introductory Calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications. Topics include:Concepts of function, limits, and continuityDifferentiation rules, application to graphing, rates, approximations, and extremum problemsDefinite and indefinite integrationFundamental theorem of calculusApplications of integration to geometry and scienceElementary functionsTechniques of integrationApproximation of definite integrals, improper integrals, and L'Hôpital's rule MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. This introductory Calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, with applications. Topics include:Concepts of function, limits, and continuityDifferentiation rules, application to graphing, rates, approximations, and extremum problemsDefinite and indefinite integrationFundamental theorem of calculusApplications of integration to geometry and scienceElementary functionsTechniques of integrationApproximation of definite integrals, improper integrals, and L'Hôpital's rule MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | differentiation and integration of functions of one variable | limits | limits | continuity | continuity | differentiation rules | differentiation rules | extremum problems | extremum problems | definite and indefinite integration | definite and indefinite integration | fundamental theorem of calculus | fundamental theorem of calculus | elementary | elementary | techniques of integration | techniques of integration | approximation of definite integrals | approximation of definite integrals | improper integrals | improper integrals | l'H?pital's rule | l'H?pital's rule | single variable calculus | single variable calculus | mathematical applications | mathematical applications | function | function | graphing | graphing | rates | rates | approximations | approximations | definite integration | definite integration | indefinite integration | indefinite integration | geometry | geometry | science | science | elementary functions | elementary functions | definite integrals | definite integrals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games.

Subjects

game | game | design | design | board | board | cards | cards | sport | sport | prototyping | prototyping | dice | dice | usability | usability | constraint | constraint | playground | playground | stratego | stratego | strategy | strategy | random | random | choice | choice | play | play | tabletop | tabletop | monopoly | monopoly | indoor | indoor | mechanic | mechanic | simulation | simulation | pitch | pitch | strategery | strategery | cooperative | cooperative | social | social | lockbox | lockbox | pandemic | pandemic | rules | rules | indie | indie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT) 3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications. This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.

Subjects

glass | glass | amorphous solid | amorphous solid | mechanical and optical properties | mechanical and optical properties | metastable | metastable | silica | silica | ideal crystals | ideal crystals | network formers | network formers | modifiers | modifiers | intermediates | intermediates | alkali silicate glass | alkali silicate glass | amorphous semiconductors | amorphous semiconductors | metallic glass | metallic glass | glass forming theory | glass forming theory | crystallization | crystallization | thermodynamics of nucleation | thermodynamics of nucleation | potential energy landscape | potential energy landscape | Zachariasen’s rules | Zachariasen’s rules | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | network topology theory | network topology theory | laboratory glass transition | laboratory glass transition | glass forming ability parmaters | glass forming ability parmaters | performance metrics | performance metrics | GST phase change alloy | GST phase change alloy | PCM | PCM | phase change memory | phase change memory | data storage | data storage | pitch drop experiment | pitch drop experiment | temperature dependence | temperature dependence | viscous flow | viscous flow | stron v. fragile liquids | stron v. fragile liquids | non- newtonian behavior | non- newtonian behavior | viscometry | viscometry | linear elasticity | linear elasticity | Newtonian viscosity | Newtonian viscosity | elasticity | elasticity | viscosity | viscosity | glass shaping | glass shaping | relaxation | relaxation | mechanical properties | mechanical properties | glass stregthening | glass stregthening | electrical properties | electrical properties | transport properties | transport properties | macroelectronics | macroelectronics | optical properties | optical properties | optical fibers | optical fibers | waveguides | waveguides | amorphous state | amorphous state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

5.76 Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure (MIT) 5.76 Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to illustrate how molecular structure is extracted from a spectrum. In order to achieve this goal it will be necessary to: master the language of spectroscopists; develop facility with quantum mechanical models; predict the relative intensities and selection rules; and learn how to assign spectra. The goal of this course is to illustrate how molecular structure is extracted from a spectrum. In order to achieve this goal it will be necessary to: master the language of spectroscopists; develop facility with quantum mechanical models; predict the relative intensities and selection rules; and learn how to assign spectra.

Subjects

Chemistry | Chemistry | molecular spectra | molecular spectra | molecular structure | molecular structure | spectroscopists | spectroscopists | quantum mechanical models | quantum mechanical models | intensities | intensities | selection rules | selection rules | energy levels | energy levels | vibrations | vibrations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Parliament and the law

Description

How are rules made and who can influence this procedure? This unit will introduce you to the rule-making processes in of the UK Houses of Parliament in Westminster. You will examine how laws are enacted and how it is possible for unelected bodies and people to influence the content of such laws.

Subjects

law | acts_of_parliament | law_making | legal_rules | legislation | parliament | rules | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT) 17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine

Subjects

game theory | game theory | game theoretic concepts | game theoretic concepts | games of complete information | games of complete information | games of incomplete information | games of incomplete information | political phenomena | political phenomena | legislative rules | legislative rules | nuclear deterrence | nuclear deterrence | electoral competition | electoral competition | imperfect markets | imperfect markets | probability | probability | calculus | calculus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata