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s Food Come From - and What will be the Consequences?

Description

The St Anne's Gaudy Seminar explores the topic of food security, focusing in particular on sustainability, supply and demand, and aid and trade. How will science, ecology and consumers have an impact on how food is produced and distributed? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

food security | sustainability | food | trade | society | genetic modification | ecology | scarcity | aid | agriculture | food security | sustainability | food | trade | society | genetic modification | ecology | scarcity | aid | agriculture | 2013-09-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.S196 Global Freshwater Crisis (MIT) 11.S196 Global Freshwater Crisis (MIT)

Description

For the first time in history, the global demand for freshwater is overtaking its supply in many parts of the world. The U.N. predicts that by 2025, more than half of the countries in the world will be experiencing water stress or outright shortages. Lack of water can cause disease, food shortages, starvation, migrations, political conflict, and even lead to war. Models of cooperation, both historic and contemporary, show the way forward. The first half of the course details the multiple facets of the water crisis. Topics include water systems, water transfers, dams, pollution, climate change, scarcity, water conflict/cooperation, food security, and agriculture. The second half of the course describes innovative solutions: Adaptive technologies and adaptation through policy, planning, mana For the first time in history, the global demand for freshwater is overtaking its supply in many parts of the world. The U.N. predicts that by 2025, more than half of the countries in the world will be experiencing water stress or outright shortages. Lack of water can cause disease, food shortages, starvation, migrations, political conflict, and even lead to war. Models of cooperation, both historic and contemporary, show the way forward. The first half of the course details the multiple facets of the water crisis. Topics include water systems, water transfers, dams, pollution, climate change, scarcity, water conflict/cooperation, food security, and agriculture. The second half of the course describes innovative solutions: Adaptive technologies and adaptation through policy, planning, mana

Subjects

Freshwater | Freshwater | water shortage | water shortage | water systems | water systems | water transfers | water transfers | dams | dams | pollution | pollution | climate change | climate change | scarcity | scarcity | water conflict/cooperation | water conflict/cooperation | food security | food security | agriculture | agriculture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s Food Come From - and What will be the Consequences?

Description

The St Anne's Gaudy Seminar explores the topic of food security, focusing in particular on sustainability, supply and demand, and aid and trade. How will science, ecology and consumers have an impact on how food is produced and distributed? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

food security | sustainability | food | trade | society | genetic modification | ecology | scarcity | aid | agriculture | food security | sustainability | food | trade | society | genetic modification | ecology | scarcity | aid | agriculture | 2013-09-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129169/video.xml

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11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT) 11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution. This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution.

Subjects

Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | speech prosody | speech prosody | models for speech recognition | models for speech recognition | speech disorders | speech disorders | other topics | other topics | environment | environment | environmental planning | environmental planning | environmental policy | environmental policy | ethics | ethics | land use planning | land use planning | environmental management | environmental management | growth | growth | scarcity | scarcity | command and control | command and control | market forces | market forces | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deep ecology | deep ecology | expert knowledge | expert knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | land conservation | land conservation | sustainable design | sustainable design | growth management | growth management | hazard mitigation | hazard mitigation | ecosystem management | ecosystem management | geospatial data | geospatial data | stormwater management | stormwater management | runoff pollution | runoff pollution | landscape ecology | landscape ecology | biodiversity | biodiversity | integrated assessment | integrated assessment | professional practice | professional practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | business choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | microeconomics | efficiency | supply | demand | consumer theory | producer theory | monopoly | imperfect competition | pricing | public goods | externalities | information uncertainty | group decision making | organizational architecture | international trade | equity | income distribution | economic rewards | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Scarcity, Choice and Opportunity Cost

Description

Colossus Project/X4L

Subjects

choice | christy | colossus | opportunity cost | scarcity | x4l | opportunity | cost | Social studies | L000 | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | E

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution.

Subjects

Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | speech prosody | models for speech recognition | speech disorders | other topics | environment | environmental planning | environmental policy | ethics | land use planning | environmental management | growth | scarcity | command and control | market forces | utilitarianism | deep ecology | expert knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | land conservation | sustainable design | growth management | hazard mitigation | ecosystem management | geospatial data | stormwater management | runoff pollution | landscape ecology | biodiversity | integrated assessment | professional practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | business choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | microeconomics | efficiency | supply | demand | consumer theory | producer theory | monopoly | imperfect competition | pricing | public goods | externalities | information uncertainty | group decision making | organizational architecture | international trade | equity | income distribution | economic rewards | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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11.S196 Global Freshwater Crisis (MIT)

Description

For the first time in history, the global demand for freshwater is overtaking its supply in many parts of the world. The U.N. predicts that by 2025, more than half of the countries in the world will be experiencing water stress or outright shortages. Lack of water can cause disease, food shortages, starvation, migrations, political conflict, and even lead to war. Models of cooperation, both historic and contemporary, show the way forward. The first half of the course details the multiple facets of the water crisis. Topics include water systems, water transfers, dams, pollution, climate change, scarcity, water conflict/cooperation, food security, and agriculture. The second half of the course describes innovative solutions: Adaptive technologies and adaptation through policy, planning, mana

Subjects

Freshwater | water shortage | water systems | water transfers | dams | pollution | climate change | scarcity | water conflict/cooperation | food security | agriculture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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