Searching for self-control : 11 results found | RSS Feed for this search

24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course. This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | belief | belief | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy | egoism | egoism | altruism | altruism | intentions | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | Humean theory of motivation | willing | willing | wanting | wanting | waiting | waiting | weakness | weakness | Akrasia | Akrasia | self-control | self-control | temptation | temptation | self-regulation | self-regulation | free will | free will | self-deception | self-deception | moral psychology | moral psychology | empirical work | empirical work | autism | autism | ethical judgment | ethical judgment | moral luck | moral luck | virtue | virtue

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2015 Leverhulme Lecture (3): Marshmallows and Moderation

Description

Is self-control a character trait or should we look to external props for self-control? There is evidence that self-control is a character trait. This evidence seems inconsistent with the management approach I advocate, since that approach urges that we look to external props for self-control, not to states of the agent. In this lecture I argue, that contrary to appearances, we should hesitate to think that people high in what is known as trait self-control have any such character trait. In fact, properly understood the evidence concerning trait self-control supports the management approach. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

self-control | moderation | psychology | self-control | moderation | psychology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2015 Leverhulme Lecture (2): The Science of Self-Control

Description

This lecture outlines some of the main perspectives on self-control and its loss stemming from recent work in psychology. I focus in particular on the puzzle arising from the role of glucose in successful self-control. Glucose ingestion seems to boost self-control but there is good evidence that it doesn't do this by providing fuel for the relevant mechanisms. I suggest that glucose functions as a cue of resource availability rather than fuel. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

self-control | psychology | self-control | psychology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2015 Leverhulme Lecture (1): Self-Control: A problem of self-management

Description

Self-control problems typically arise from conflicts between smaller sooner and larger later rewards. In this lecture I suggest that we often fail successfully to navigate these problems because of our commitment to a conception of ourselves as rational agents who answer questions about ourselves by looking to the world. Despite the attractions of this conception, I argue that it undermines efforts at self-control and thereby our capacity to pursue the ends we value. I suggest we think of self-control as a problem of self-management, whereby we manipulate ourselves. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

self-control | instant gratification | delayed gratification | self-control | instant gratification | delayed gratification | 2015-02-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | motivation | social psychology | sociology | belief | desire | moral motivation | sympathy | empathy | intention | will | addiction | resolution | rationality | identification | autonomy | egoism | altruism | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | willing | wanting | waiting | weakness | Akrasia | self-control | temptation | self-regulation | free will | self-deception | moral psychology | empirical work | autism | ethical judgment | moral luck | virtue

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata