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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT) 17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | citizenship | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | democracy | democracy | nations | nations | politics | politics | class differentiation | class differentiation | pluralism | pluralism | national unity | national unity | contemporary | contemporary | political | political | philosophy | philosophy | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | racial | racial | ethnic | ethnic | groups | groups | national | national | minorities | minorities | aboriginals | aboriginals | women | women | sexual | sexual | injustice | injustice | recognition | recognition | accommodation | accommodation | democratic | democratic | states | states | group-differentiated | group-differentiated | rights | rights | exemptions | exemptions | laws | laws | representation | representation | language | language | limited | limited | self-government | self-government | theories | theories | justice | justice | conflict | conflict | liberalequality | liberalequality | citizens | citizens | multi-religious | multi-religious | multicultural | multicultural | society | society | diversity | diversity | communitarian | communitarian | civic | civic | republican | republican | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan | pluralist | pluralist | radical | radical | postmodern | postmodern | American | American | gender | gender | class | class | differentiation | differentiation | liberal | liberal | equality | equality | unity | unity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | Aristotle | political research | regimes | Marxist model | class alliances | democracy | pluralism | economic growth | party formation | political elites | interest groups | constitutional reform | political system | constitutional choice | leadership | state formation | modernization | political institution | embedded autonomy | dead capital | nationalism | electoral behavior | clientelism | patronage politics | corruption | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | ethnicity | identity | democracy | nations | politics | class differentiation | pluralism | national unity | contemporary | political | philosophy | multiculturalism | racial | ethnic | groups | national | minorities | aboriginals | women | sexual | injustice | recognition | accommodation | democratic | states | group-differentiated | rights | exemptions | laws | representation | language | limited | self-government | theories | justice | conflict | liberalequality | citizens | multi-religious | multicultural | society | diversity | communitarian | civic | republican | cosmopolitan | pluralist | radical | postmodern | American | gender | class | differentiation | liberal | equality | unity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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