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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.904 Seminar in Topology (MIT) 18.904 Seminar in Topology (MIT)

Description

In this course, students present and discuss the subject matter with faculty guidance. Topics presented by the students include the fundamental group and covering spaces. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided to the students. In this course, students present and discuss the subject matter with faculty guidance. Topics presented by the students include the fundamental group and covering spaces. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided to the students.

Subjects

student lectures | student lectures | seminar | seminar | topology | topology | fundamental group | fundamental group | covering spaces | covering spaces | communication | communication | oral communication | oral communication | mathematical writing | mathematical writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.89 Topics in Computational and Systems Biology (MIT) 7.89 Topics in Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar based on research literature. Papers covered are selected to illustrate important problems and approaches in the field of computational and systems biology, and provide students a framework from which to evaluate new developments. The MIT Initiative in Computational and Systems Biology (CSBi) is a campus-wide research and education program that links biology, engineering, and computer science in a multidisciplinary approach to the systematic analysis and modeling of complex biological phenomena. This course is one of a series of core subjects offered through the CSB PhD program, for students with an interest in interdisciplinary training and research in the area of computational and systems biology. Acknowledgments In addition to the staff listed on this page, the followi This is a seminar based on research literature. Papers covered are selected to illustrate important problems and approaches in the field of computational and systems biology, and provide students a framework from which to evaluate new developments. The MIT Initiative in Computational and Systems Biology (CSBi) is a campus-wide research and education program that links biology, engineering, and computer science in a multidisciplinary approach to the systematic analysis and modeling of complex biological phenomena. This course is one of a series of core subjects offered through the CSB PhD program, for students with an interest in interdisciplinary training and research in the area of computational and systems biology. Acknowledgments In addition to the staff listed on this page, the followi

Subjects

computational | computational | systems | systems | biology | biology | seminar | seminar | literature review | literature review | statistics | statistics | developmental | developmental | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | physics | physics | genomics | genomics | signal transduction | signal transduction | regulation | regulation | medicine | medicine | kinetics | kinetics | protein structure | protein structure | devices | devices | synthesis | synthesis | networks | networks | mapping | mapping

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT) 1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

1.133 is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (M. Eng.) program. It features lectures presented by a variety of industry and academic speakers. The course is designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and to expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communications, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevent large scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. Course lectures are integrated with a weekly seminar series and the MEng group project subjects which are mentioned herein.  1.133 is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (M. Eng.) program. It features lectures presented by a variety of industry and academic speakers. The course is designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and to expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communications, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevent large scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. Course lectures are integrated with a weekly seminar series and the MEng group project subjects which are mentioned herein. 

Subjects

professional engineer | professional engineer | team-building skills | team-building skills | lectures | lectures | team workshops | team workshops | seminars | seminars | written communication | written communication | oral communication | oral communication | job placement skills | job placement skills | trends in the engineering | trends in the engineering | trends in construction industry | trends in construction industry | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | managing public information | managing public information | proposal preparation | proposal preparation | project evaluation | project evaluation | project management | project management | liability | liability | professional ethics | professional ethics | negotiation | negotiation | construction industry | construction industry | engineering | engineering | resume writing | resume writing | technical writing | technical writing | job placement interviews | job placement interviews | alternative dispute resolution | alternative dispute resolution

License

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22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

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4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

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3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

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17.THT Thesis Research Design Seminar (MIT) 17.THT Thesis Research Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This seminar is for students who plan to write a senior thesis in Political Science, and is required of all MIT Political Science majors. Seminar participants will develop their research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame their research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses, and write a complete prospectus of the project. This seminar is for students who plan to write a senior thesis in Political Science, and is required of all MIT Political Science majors. Seminar participants will develop their research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame their research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses, and write a complete prospectus of the project.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | seminar | seminar | senior thesis | senior thesis | research topics | research topics | scholarship | scholarship | research questions | research questions | methodology | methodology | analysis | analysis | prospectus | prospectus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation. The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT) 3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT)

Description

Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind musical instruments? Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research and they have been the focus of investigation in this course for the past three years. Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind musical instruments? Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research and they have been the focus of investigation in this course for the past three years.

Subjects

biomimicry | biomimicry | bird | bird | feather | feather | bone | bone | structure | structure | plant structure | plant structure | cellular solids | cellular solids | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | biomimetics | biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | tree | tree | tree trunk | tree trunk

License

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24.261 Philosophy of Love in the Western World (MIT) 24.261 Philosophy of Love in the Western World (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the nature of love and sex, approached as topics both in philosophy and in literature. Readings from recent philosophy as well as classic myths of love that occur in works of literature and lend themselves to philosophical analysis. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the nature of love and sex, approached as topics both in philosophy and in literature. Readings from recent philosophy as well as classic myths of love that occur in works of literature and lend themselves to philosophical analysis.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | seminar | seminar | love | love | sex | sex | literature | literature | film | film | readings | readings | classic myths | classic myths | analysis | analysis | marriage | marriage | romance | romance | tragedy | tragedy | Don Juan | Don Juan | Shaw | Shaw | George Bernard | George Bernard | Pygmalion. | Pygmalion.

License

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24.213 Philosophy of Film (MIT) 24.213 Philosophy of Film (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art, with an emphasis on the ways in which it creates meaning through techniques that define a formal structure. There is a particular focus on aesthetic problems about appearance and reality, literary and visual effects, communication and alienation through film technology. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art, with an emphasis on the ways in which it creates meaning through techniques that define a formal structure. There is a particular focus on aesthetic problems about appearance and reality, literary and visual effects, communication and alienation through film technology.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | seminar | seminar | analysis | analysis | film | film | art | art | meaning | meaning | formal structure | formal structure | aesthetic | aesthetic | problems | problems | appearance | appearance | reality | reality | literary | literary | visual effects | visual effects | communication | communication | alienation | alienation | technology | technology | Beauty and the Beast | Beauty and the Beast | Welles | Welles | Orson | Orson | Citizen Kane | Citizen Kane | Allen | Allen | Woody | Woody | The Purple Rose of Cairo | The Purple Rose of Cairo | Visconti | Visconti | Luchino | Luchino | Death in Venice | Death in Venice | Renoir | Renoir | Jean | Jean | The Rules of the Game | The Rules of the Game | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Alfred | Alfred | The 39 Steps | The 39 Steps | Lindstrom | Lindstrom | Megahey | Megahey | BBC Television | BBC Television | The Magnificent Ambersons | The Magnificent Ambersons | The Crime of Monsieur Lange | The Crime of Monsieur Lange | Le Roi d'Yveto | Le Roi d'Yveto

License

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1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT) 1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject.

Subjects

professional engineer | professional engineer | team-building skills | team-building skills | lectures | lectures | team workshops | team workshops | seminars | seminars | written communication | written communication | oral communication | oral communication | job placement skills | job placement skills | trends in engineering | trends in engineering | trends in construction industry | trends in construction industry | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | proposal preparation | proposal preparation | request for proposal | request for proposal | small business | small business | professional registration | professional registration | project evaluation | project evaluation | project management | project management | liability | liability | professional ethics | professional ethics | negotiation | negotiation

License

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3.A04 Modern Blacksmithing and Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.A04 Modern Blacksmithing and Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

Physical metallurgy encompasses the relationships between the composition, structure, processing history and properties of metallic materials. In this seminar you'll be introduced to metallurgy in a particularly "physical" way. We will do blacksmithing, metal casting, machining, and welding, using both traditional and modern methods. The seminar meets once per week for an evening laboratory session, and once per week for discussion of issues in materials science and engineering that tie in to the laboratory work. Students will begin by completing some specified projects and progress to designing and fabricating one forged and one cast piece. Physical metallurgy encompasses the relationships between the composition, structure, processing history and properties of metallic materials. In this seminar you'll be introduced to metallurgy in a particularly "physical" way. We will do blacksmithing, metal casting, machining, and welding, using both traditional and modern methods. The seminar meets once per week for an evening laboratory session, and once per week for discussion of issues in materials science and engineering that tie in to the laboratory work. Students will begin by completing some specified projects and progress to designing and fabricating one forged and one cast piece.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | forge | forge | casting | casting | lost-wax | lost-wax | steel | steel | phase diagrams | phase diagrams | student work | student work | photos | photos

License

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3.A27 Case Studies in Forensic Metallurgy (MIT) 3.A27 Case Studies in Forensic Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

TV programs such as "Law and Order" show how forensic experts are called upon to give testimony that often determines the outcome of court cases. Engineers are one class of expert who can help display evidence in a new light to solve cases. In this seminar you will be part of the problem-solving process, working through both previously solved and unsolved cases. Each week we will investigate cases, from the facts that make up each side to the potential evidence we can use as engineers to expose culprits. The cases range from disintegrating airplane engines to gas main explosions to Mafia murders. This seminar will be full of discussions about the cases and creative approaches to reaching the solutions. The approach is hands-on so you will have a chance to participate in the process, not TV programs such as "Law and Order" show how forensic experts are called upon to give testimony that often determines the outcome of court cases. Engineers are one class of expert who can help display evidence in a new light to solve cases. In this seminar you will be part of the problem-solving process, working through both previously solved and unsolved cases. Each week we will investigate cases, from the facts that make up each side to the potential evidence we can use as engineers to expose culprits. The cases range from disintegrating airplane engines to gas main explosions to Mafia murders. This seminar will be full of discussions about the cases and creative approaches to reaching the solutions. The approach is hands-on so you will have a chance to participate in the process, not

Subjects

case studies | case studies | failure | failure | fracture | fracture | seminar | seminar | stainless steel | stainless steel | aluminum | aluminum | catastrophic failure | catastrophic failure | soldering | soldering | brazing | brazing | welding | welding | corrosion | corrosion | oxidation | oxidation | fatigue | fatigue

License

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT) 3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | magnetic field | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | Mr. Magnet | levitation | levitation | hard disk | hard disk | magnetoptic | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | imaging | imaging | SQUID | SQUID | biomagnetism | biomagnetism | NMR | NMR

License

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15.098 Special Seminar in Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes (MIT) 15.098 Special Seminar in Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes (MIT)

Description

This seminar is intended for doctoral students and discusses topics in applied probability. This semester includes a variety of fields, namely statistical physics (local weak convergence and correlation decay), artificial intelligence (belief propagation algorithms), computer science (random K-SAT problem, coloring, average case complexity) and electrical engineering (low density parity check (LDPC) codes). This seminar is intended for doctoral students and discusses topics in applied probability. This semester includes a variety of fields, namely statistical physics (local weak convergence and correlation decay), artificial intelligence (belief propagation algorithms), computer science (random K-SAT problem, coloring, average case complexity) and electrical engineering (low density parity check (LDPC) codes).

Subjects

doctoral | doctoral | seminar | seminar | applied probability | applied probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | statistical physics | statistical physics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | computer science | computer science | belief propagation algorithms | belief propagation algorithms | K-SAT problem | K-SAT problem | coloring | coloring | average case complexity | average case complexity | low density parity check codes | low density parity check codes

License

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15.975 Special Seminar in Management The Nuts and Bolts of Business Plans (MIT) 15.975 Special Seminar in Management The Nuts and Bolts of Business Plans (MIT)

Description

The nuts and bolts of preparing a Business Plan will be explored in this 16th annual course offering. The course is open to members of the MIT Community and to others interested in entrepreneurship. It is particularly recommended for persons who are interested in starting or are involved in a new business. Because some of the speakers will be judges of the MIT $50K Entrepreneurship Competition, persons who are planning to enter the Competition should find the course particularly useful. Historically, the number of students taking the course is 250+, divided approximately 50/50 between Scientist/Engineers and Sloan students. The nuts and bolts of preparing a Business Plan will be explored in this 16th annual course offering. The course is open to members of the MIT Community and to others interested in entrepreneurship. It is particularly recommended for persons who are interested in starting or are involved in a new business. Because some of the speakers will be judges of the MIT $50K Entrepreneurship Competition, persons who are planning to enter the Competition should find the course particularly useful. Historically, the number of students taking the course is 250+, divided approximately 50/50 between Scientist/Engineers and Sloan students.

Subjects

preparing a Business Plan | preparing a Business Plan | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | new business | new business | MIT $50K Entrepreneurship Competition | MIT $50K Entrepreneurship Competition | seminar | seminar

License

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15.974 Practical Leadership (MIT) 15.974 Practical Leadership (MIT)

Description

Practical Leadership is an interactive seminar where students receive repeated coaching and real-time feedback on their own leadership capabilities from their peers and the instructor. The course is structured around a set of readings. However, the key component is each student's own self-assessment. These self-assessments are done by the students in the first week of the semester. The areas for improvement that the students identify are then targeted in the weekly role plays that are customized for each student in the class. The goal of the class is for each student to increase his or her own leadership abilities through an ongoing cycle of practice, feedback and reflection. Practical Leadership is an interactive seminar where students receive repeated coaching and real-time feedback on their own leadership capabilities from their peers and the instructor. The course is structured around a set of readings. However, the key component is each student's own self-assessment. These self-assessments are done by the students in the first week of the semester. The areas for improvement that the students identify are then targeted in the weekly role plays that are customized for each student in the class. The goal of the class is for each student to increase his or her own leadership abilities through an ongoing cycle of practice, feedback and reflection.

Subjects

leadership capabilities | leadership capabilities | self-assessment | self-assessment | interactive seminar | interactive seminar | reflection | reflection | coaching | coaching | real-time feedback | real-time feedback

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

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22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT) 22.A09 Career Options for Biomedical Research (MIT)

Description

This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica This course has been designed as a seminar to give students an understanding of how scientists with medical or scientific degrees conduct research in both hospital and academic settings. There will be interactive discussions with research clinicians and scientists about the career opportunities and research challenges in the biomedical field, which an MIT student might prepare for by obtaining an MD, PhD, or combined degrees. The seminar will be held in a case presentation format, with topics chosen from the radiological sciences, including current research in magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and other nuclear imaging techniques, and advances in radiation therapy. With the lectures as background, we will also examine alternative and related options such as biomedica

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | career | career | career planning | career planning | biotech | biotech | hospital | hospital | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | biologist | biologist | radiation science | radiation science | research | research | scientist | scientist | doctor | doctor | medicine | medicine | MRI | MRI | radiology | radiology | neuroscience | neuroscience

License

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SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT) SP.272 Culture Tech (MIT)

Description

This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw This class is divided into a series of sections or "modules", each of which concentrates on a particular large technology-related topic in a cultural context. The class will start with a four-week module on Samurai Swords and Blacksmithing, followed by smaller units on Chinese Cooking, the Invention of Clocks, and Andean Weaving, and end with a four-week module on Automobiles and Engines. In addition, there will be a series of hands-on projects that tie theory and practice together. The class discussions range across anthropology, history, and individual development, emphasizing recurring themes, such as the interaction between technology and culture and the relation between "skill" knowledge and "craft" knowledge.Culture Tech evolved from a more extensive, tw

Subjects

seminar | seminar | samurai | samurai | cooking | cooking | blacksmithing | blacksmithing | Japan | Japan | Peru | Peru | China | China | U.S.A | U.S.A | England | England | longitude | longitude | marine navigation | marine navigation | clocks | clocks | cars | cars | suburbia | suburbia | weaving | weaving | quipus | quipus | encoding | encoding | aesthetics | aesthetics | Zen Buddhism | Zen Buddhism | Inca Empire | Inca Empire | culture | culture | myths | myths | technology | technology | social change | social change

License

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