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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT) 24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | brain | philosophy | philosophy | science | science | holism | holism | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Neurotransmitters (MIT) Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation. Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | brain | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | science | science | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT) CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT)

Description

In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications. In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications.

Subjects

media | media | design | design | visual design | visual design | visual literacy | visual literacy | comics | comics | semiotics | semiotics | sequential art | sequential art | signs | signs | shapes | shapes | patterns | patterns | augury | augury | cognition | cognition | creativity | creativity | psychology | psychology | image | image | imago | imago | mimesis | mimesis | representation | representation | icon | icon | iconology | iconology | iconoclasm | iconoclasm | iconogasm | iconogasm | gestalt | gestalt | ideology | ideology | text | text | shahrazad | shahrazad | myth | myth | mythos | mythos | mythology | mythology | typography | typography | type | type | information design | information design | color | color | space | space | visual culture | visual culture | digital media | digital media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.962 Special Topics in Media Technology: Computational Semantics (MIT) MAS.962 Special Topics in Media Technology: Computational Semantics (MIT)

Description

How do words get their meanings? How can word meanings be represented and used by machines? We will explore three families of approaches to these questions from a computational perspective. Relational / structural methods such as semantic networks represent the meaning of words in terms of their relations to other words. Knowledge of the world through perception and action leads to the notion of external grounding, a process by which word meanings are 'attached' to the world. How an agent theorizes about, and conceptualizes its world provides yet another foundation for word meanings. We will examine each of these perspectives, and consider ways to integrate them. How do words get their meanings? How can word meanings be represented and used by machines? We will explore three families of approaches to these questions from a computational perspective. Relational / structural methods such as semantic networks represent the meaning of words in terms of their relations to other words. Knowledge of the world through perception and action leads to the notion of external grounding, a process by which word meanings are 'attached' to the world. How an agent theorizes about, and conceptualizes its world provides yet another foundation for word meanings. We will examine each of these perspectives, and consider ways to integrate them.

Subjects

signifier | signifier | sign | sign | agent | agent | semiotics | semiotics | semantics | semantics | computational semantics | computational semantics | meaning | meaning | words | words | external grounding | external grounding | relational networks | relational networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT)

Description

In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications.

Subjects

media | design | visual design | visual literacy | comics | semiotics | sequential art | signs | shapes | patterns | augury | cognition | creativity | psychology | image | imago | mimesis | representation | icon | iconology | iconoclasm | iconogasm | gestalt | ideology | text | shahrazad | myth | mythos | mythology | typography | type | information design | color | space | visual culture | digital media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to Literary Theory

Description

This course introduces the field of literary theory by identifying and engaging with the key problems and questions that animate theoretical discussion among literary scholars and critics, including issues pertaining to ideology, cultural value, the patriarchal and colonial bases of Western culture, and more. The student will be acquainted with the basic principles and preeminent texts that have defined many of the major critical debates of the 20th and 21st centuries. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English Literature 301)

Subjects

english | literary theory | literature | structuralism | feminism | discourse | form | structure | signs | semiotics | deconstruction | gender | queer theory | ideology | reader-response | context | culture | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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MAS.962 Special Topics in Media Technology: Computational Semantics (MIT)

Description

How do words get their meanings? How can word meanings be represented and used by machines? We will explore three families of approaches to these questions from a computational perspective. Relational / structural methods such as semantic networks represent the meaning of words in terms of their relations to other words. Knowledge of the world through perception and action leads to the notion of external grounding, a process by which word meanings are 'attached' to the world. How an agent theorizes about, and conceptualizes its world provides yet another foundation for word meanings. We will examine each of these perspectives, and consider ways to integrate them.

Subjects

signifier | sign | agent | semiotics | semantics | computational semantics | meaning | words | external grounding | relational networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | philosophy | science | holism | cultural object | contemporary media | society | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | anthropology | history | semiotics | cognitive sciences | historical views | digital images | psychopharmacology | mental illness | neurotransmitters | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Interpreting Environment, Society and Culture Through Signs

Description

Introductory lecture, suitable for a Cultural Studies class, on the use of public signs to interpret culture. The presentation gives an account of the structure and origins of signs, drawn from the natural world and ancestral history, illustrated with some specfic examples from a British context.

Subjects

semiotics | semiology | culture | society | customs | signs | signifier | signified | interpretation | language | public | nation | history | diachronic | synchronic | britain | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

This course is a study of the history of theater art and practice from its origins to the modern period, including its roles in non-western cultures. Special attention is given to the relationship between the literary and performative dimensions of drama, and the relationship between drama and its cultural context.

Subjects

drama | Brecht | modern theatre | Octoroon | Elam | Cixous | Hroswitha | Boucicault | Trifles | Aristotle | Poetics | Sophocles | Oedipus | Euripides | Medea | Dulcitius | York Crucifixion | Kan'ami | Matsukaze | Japan | Zeami | Calderon | Life is a Dream | A Doll's House | Modern Europe | Churchill | Cloud Nine | Street Scene | Treadwell | Machinal | Fires in the Mirror | Anna Deavere Smith | Gao | The Other Shore | realism | semiotics | Western Origins | England | America | performance art | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Word and image

Description

Why does the way a page looks influence how we interpret the information it contains? This unit looks will examine how typography and images can be combined to improve literary creativity and allow a document to communicate more readily with the reader.

Subjects

arts and history | formalism | images | literary_creativity | meaning | semiotics | text_interpretation | typography | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Semiotics

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Historical analysis

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | historical | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Psychoanalytical

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | historical | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Formalism

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | historical | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Phenomenology

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | historical | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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In Conversation Between Dawn Youll, Lowri Davies and Natasha Mayo about the Exhibition 'Placement' 2011

Description

However, beyond mere documentation of what has happened, film can also enable a re-activation of the happening itself, imbued with the emotion of the moment of its telling. It allows thought to be experienced as a succession of unfolding events; recording connections and associations made and the consequence of their interaction

Subjects

process | pedagogy | aesthetics | jorumcomp10 | art | sculpture | analysis | ideas | materials | expression | creative thinking | problem solving | fragmentation | development | drawing | presentation | curation | design | ceramics | juxtaposition | exhibition | illustration | film | research | formalism | psychoanalytical | phenomenology | reflection | video | environment | semiotics | historical | creativity | oer | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT)

Description

In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications.

Subjects

media | design | visual design | visual literacy | comics | semiotics | sequential art | signs | shapes | patterns | augury | cognition | creativity | psychology | image | imago | mimesis | representation | icon | iconology | iconoclasm | iconogasm | gestalt | ideology | text | shahrazad | myth | mythos | mythology | typography | type | information design | color | space | visual culture | digital media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Art Historical Methodologies

Description

This course is an introduction to the major methodologies used by art historians. Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Art History 301)

Subjects

art | formalism | psychoanalysis | freud | marxism | feminism | semiotics | museums | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Research methods: Semiotics and signification

Description

This resource is part of "Research methods" module. This module is designed primarily for students taking sport-related courses, but knowledge and use of research methods is widely shared across a range of social science disciplines, so students from any other such discipline should find this useful too. It is important to focus on methods, almost to the exclusion of any actual content, at least until you find your bearings. Thus although there are important differences between them students of Outdoor Adventure should find something of interest in material devoted to discussing Leisure, Sport Development, Sport Management and others. This resource focuses on issues of semiotics and signification, using examples related to leisure and outdoor education.

Subjects

semiotics | signification | sociology | research methods | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | cultural object | contemporary media | science | society | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | anthropology | history | semiotics | cognitive sciences | historical views | digital images | psychopharmacology | mental illness | neurotransmitters | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | many theatre artists | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre architecture | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | tiring house | realistic theatre | scene design | staging practices | female playwrights | crisis drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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