Searching for senses : 21 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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9.35 Sensation and Perception (MIT) 9.35 Sensation and Perception (MIT)

Description

This course studies how senses work and how physical stimuli get transformed into signals in the nervous system. Students examine how the brain uses those signals to determine what's out there in the world. All the senses are discussed but vision is covered most extensively, with topics including the perception of color, motion, form, and depth. Graduate students are expected to complete additional work. This course studies how senses work and how physical stimuli get transformed into signals in the nervous system. Students examine how the brain uses those signals to determine what's out there in the world. All the senses are discussed but vision is covered most extensively, with topics including the perception of color, motion, form, and depth. Graduate students are expected to complete additional work.

Subjects

senses | senses | stimuli | stimuli | system | system | vision | vision | perception | perception | color | color | motion | motion | form | form | depth | depth

License

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9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

human behavior | human behavior | brain | brain | perception | perception | memory | memory | motivation | motivation | emotion | emotion | learning | learning | senses | senses | sensation | sensation | cognition | cognition | thinking | thinking | language | language | intelligence | intelligence | love | love | evolution | evolution | attitude | attitude | behavior | behavior | self | self | dissociation | dissociation | repression | repression | morality | morality | Freud | Freud | sleep | sleep | dreams | dreams | mental illness | mental illness | fairy tale | fairy tale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.35 Sensation And Perception (MIT) 9.35 Sensation And Perception (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate, or are they acquired by experience? (And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'?) Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course will include guest lectures by Professors. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate, or are they acquired by experience? (And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'?) Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course will include guest lectures by Professors.

Subjects

vision | vision | sensation | sensation | perception | perception | psychophysics | psychophysics | illusion | illusion | depth | depth | parallax | parallax | motion | motion | occlusion | occlusion | matching | matching | recognition | recognition | smell | smell | taste | taste | hearing | hearing | perspective | perspective | sight | sight | figure | figure | ground | ground | completion | completion | modal | modal | senses | senses | stimuli | stimuli | system | system | color | color | form | form | depth. | depth.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT) 21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course "The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | scientific thought | scientific thought | scientific method | scientific method | mathematics | mathematics | chance | chance | risk | risk | statistics | statistics | history of science | history of science | quantitative measurement | quantitative measurement | chaos | chaos | uncertainty | uncertainty | induction | induction | deduction | deduction | inference | inference | luck | luck | gambling | gambling | cause and effect | cause and effect | games of chance | games of chance | fate | fate | prediction | prediction | rationality | rationality | decision making | decision making | religion | religion | randomness | randomness | knowledge | knowledge | fact | fact | human nature | human nature | mind | mind | senses | senses | intelligence | intelligence | metaphor | metaphor | Darwinism | Darwinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT) 21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT)

Description

Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | culture | culture | embodiment | embodiment | senses | senses | historical | historical | cross-cultural analysis | cross-cultural analysis | politics | politics | sensory experience | sensory experience | western philosophical debates | western philosophical debates | mind | mind | brain | brain | emotion | emotion | body | body | sight | sight | reason | reason | rationality | rationality | smell | smell | taste | taste | touch | touch | knowing | knowing | knowledge production | knowledge production | scientific interpretations | scientific interpretations | western philosophical | western philosophical | physiological models | physiological models | individual physiological | individual physiological | psychological responses | psychological responses | social relations | social relations | power relations | power relations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Brownies working together

Description

Members of the Royal Victoria School for the Blind Brownie pack, January 1962 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/28235D). Tyne & Wear Archives is proud to present a series of images relating to the Royal Victoria School for the Blind, Newcastle upon Tyne. The set has been produced to celebrate UK Disability History Month 2014. The Royal Victoria School for the Blind (then known as the Royal Victoria Asylum) was established from a fund to mark the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1837 and was originally located at the Spital before moving to premises in Northumberland Street. In the 1890s the name was changed to the Royal Victoria School, and in 1895 the school moved to the former house of Dr Hodgkinson in Benwell Dene. Pupils came from throughout the North of England. As a result of legislation to integrate special groups within the mainstream education system the school closed in 1985. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

children | education | royalvictoriaschoolfortheblind | newcastleupontyne | brownies | girlguiding | crafts | disability | ukdisabilityhistorymonth | blindness | visualimpairment | blackandwhitephotograph | socialheritage | browniepack | january1962 | 2014 | royalvictoriaasylum | coronation | queenvictoria | 1837 | spital | northumberlandstreet | premises | drhodgkinson | benwelldene | northofengland | specialgroups | shirt | costume | dummy | face | dress | belt | badge | tie | pin | hair | wool | touch | senses | figure | pillow | cloth | material | table | carpet | pattern | floor | wall | chair | fireplace | ledge | shelf | timber | frame | glass | lightshade | stand | glasses | smile | attentive | striking | unusual | fastener | zip | hand | girls | female | light | shadow | photoframe | books | window | curtain | watch

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Brownies taking part in craft activities

Description

Members of the Royal Victoria School for the Blind Brownie pack, January 1962 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/28235A). Tyne & Wear Archives is proud to present a series of images relating to the Royal Victoria School for the Blind, Newcastle upon Tyne. The set has been produced to celebrate UK Disability History Month 2014. The Royal Victoria School for the Blind (then known as the Royal Victoria Asylum) was established from a fund to mark the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1837 and was originally located at the Spital before moving to premises in Northumberland Street. In the 1890s the name was changed to the Royal Victoria School, and in 1895 the school moved to the former house of Dr Hodgkinson in Benwell Dene. Pupils came from throughout the North of England. As a result of legislation to integrate special groups within the mainstream education system the school closed in 1985. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

children | education | royalvictoriaschoolfortheblind | newcastleupontyne | brownies | girlguiding | crafts | disability | ukdisabilityhistorymonth | blindness | visualimpairment | blackandwhitephotograph | activities | browniepack | january1962 | 2014 | royalvictoriaasylum | coronation | queenvictoria | 1837 | northofengland | pupils | school | formerhouse | drhodgkinson | benwelldene | integrate | specialgroups | mainstreameducationsystem | 1985 | legislation | socialheritage | abstract | unusual | girl | girls | table | britishflag | crease | hair | uniform | tie | dress | belt | uniforms | eyeglasses | eye | touch | feel | plate | shine | scratch | paint | leg | carpet | pattern | floor | wall | shadow | light | mantelpiece | tile | glass | door | frame | structure | doors | concentrating | absorbed | companion | companionship | identification | read | senses | sensation | awareness

License

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9.35 Sensation And Perception (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate, or are they acquired by experience? (And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'?) Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course will include guest lectures by Professors.

Subjects

vision | sensation | perception | psychophysics | illusion | depth | parallax | motion | occlusion | matching | recognition | smell | taste | hearing | perspective | sight | figure | ground | completion | modal | senses | stimuli | system | color | form | depth.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | scientific thought | scientific method | mathematics | chance | risk | statistics | history of science | quantitative measurement | chaos | uncertainty | induction | deduction | inference | luck | gambling | cause and effect | games of chance | fate | prediction | rationality | decision making | religion | randomness | knowledge | fact | human nature | mind | senses | intelligence | metaphor | Darwinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Who Can Name Them All?

Description

Busts of famous men being examined by the Blind,1913. ?To them, their fingers are eyes? From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ?eagerly accepted?. Ref: TWCMS:K13584(2) view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | sessions | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | socialhistory | interior | room | wall | floor | shadow | artificiallight | seeingthroughtouch | blackandwhitephotograph | artanddesign | industry | digitalimage | archives | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | busts | famousmen | table | stand | paintings | frame | timber | varnish | senses | hendon | examining | examination | 1913 | fingers | eyes | humantouch | sight | formercurator | invitation | sunderlandcouncilblindschool | handle | handling | artefacts | discovery | unusual | fascinating | engaging | geoffreychauce | williamshakespeare | francisbacon | charlesdickens | thomascarlyle | johnmilton | aristotle | robertburns | walterscott

License

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River Wear Bridges

Description

Blind visitors to Sunderland Museum, examining models of the old and new bridge across the river Wear. ?To them, their fingers are eyes? From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ?eagerly accepted?. TWCMS:K13581 view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | sessions | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | riverwear | bridge | sunderlandbridge | wearmouthbridge | socialhistory | northeastofengland | room | interior | unitedkingdom | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | fascinating | interesting | unusual | poignant | table | standing | gathering | formercurator | senses | handling | artefacts | sunderlandcouncilblindschool | seeingthroughtouch | museumcollection | signal | communication | communicating | wall | neutralbackground | examiningmodels | oldbridge | newbridge | models | hendon | england | glasses | engaged | suit | hair | tie | blouse | reflection | grain | mark | dress | fabric | crease | riverwearbridges | fingers | artdesign

License

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Soldiers Wear

Description

3 blind women examining articles worn by soldiers at Sunderland Museums, 1913. ?To them, their fingers are eyes? From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ?eagerly accepted?. Ref: TWCMS:K13823.3 view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | sessions | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | firstworldwar | socialhistory | women | dress | fabric | crease | standing | room | seeingthroughtouch | blindness | 3blindwomen | examining | examinaton | articles | clothing | uniform | soldiers | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | hendon | england | sunderlandmuseums | 1913 | fingers | hand | senses | eyes | ww1 | formercurator | invitation | sunderlandcouncilblindschool | educational | artefacts | profound | simplicity | painting | frame | portrait | industry | archives | digitalimage | wall | floor | shine | boots | gathering | attentive | handling | object | man | apron | blackandwhitephotograph

License

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Potters Wheel

Description

The blind visitors to Sunderland Museum are using a potter's wheel and clay.1913 ?To them, their fingers are eyes? From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ?eagerly accepted?. Ref: TWCMS:K13801 view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | sessions | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | potterswheel | clay | 1913 | visitorservices | socialhistory | archives | seeingthroughtouch | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | blackandwhitephotograph | frame | label | text | october1913 | blindvisitors | fingers | eyes | johnalfredcharltondea | formercurator | interior | room | wall | floor | curtain | decoration | flowers | fascinating | unusual | poignant | museumcollection | sunderlandcouncilblindschool | eager | apron | ribbon | dress | suit | tie | waistcoat | shirt | tablecloth | container | box | furniture | plant | signage | senses | touching | handling | attentive | standing | gathering | grain

License

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Skeleton

Description

Here is an example of a blind person "seeing" through touch of a skeleton at Sunderland Museum. ?To them, their fingers are eyes? From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ?eagerly accepted?. Ref: TWCMS:K13810(2) view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

skeleton | blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | sessions | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | artificiallight | interior | room | shadow | man | suit | standing | handling | touching | senses | signal | wall | timber | beard | pocket | crease | mark | blur | hook | chain | loop | tie | shirt | seeing | through | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | socialhistory | archives | poignant | fascinating | engaging | unusual | museumcollection | blindman | formercurator | sunderlandcouncilblindschool | eager | wonderful | artanddesign | abstract | bone | human | hangingskeleton

License

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A Girl 'Seeing'

Description

Here is a young girl who is blind - examining mounted birds at Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens. Charlton Deas, curator at Sunderland Museum was a pioneer in making museums accessible to disabled people, especially blind/visually impaired people. In 1913 he organised a number of handling sessions for both blind adults and children. Ref: TWCMS:K13593_2 view the set www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/sets/72157626903151525/ (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure - for image licensing enquiries please follow this link www.twmuseums.org.uk/image-licensing/

Subjects

blind | children | adults | johnalfredcharltondeas | charltondeas | handlingsessions | sunderland | sunderlandmuseum | touch | see | objects | collections | access | curator | northeast | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | oldphotos | younggirl | mountedbirds | birds | feathers | beak | neutralbackground | dress | cloth | expression | bodygesture | ribbon | hair | paintings | frame | landscape | oil | oils | rope | boundary | pole | stand | decoration | shoe | crease | stocking | blouse | arm | hand | face | stilt | halfmemorytheglasstrunk | seeingthroughtouch | senses | feel | feeling | unusual | fascinating | socialhistory | blackandwhitephotograph | mark | floor | grain | debris | wood | mount | stuffing | wintergardens | examination | examining | accessible | disabled | visuallyimpaired | taxidermy

License

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9.35 Sensation and Perception (MIT)

Description

This course studies how senses work and how physical stimuli get transformed into signals in the nervous system. Students examine how the brain uses those signals to determine what's out there in the world. All the senses are discussed but vision is covered most extensively, with topics including the perception of color, motion, form, and depth. Graduate students are expected to complete additional work.

Subjects

senses | stimuli | system | vision | perception | color | motion | form | depth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

human behavior | brain | perception | memory | motivation | emotion | learning | senses | sensation | cognition | thinking | language | intelligence | love | evolution | attitude | behavior | self | dissociation | repression | morality | Freud | sleep | dreams | mental illness | fairy tale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Human Anatomy - Laboratory

Description

In this lab, the student will review the anatomy and histology of the organs by using images of models, microscopic slides, and videos on cat and sheep dissections. The student will then be asked to assess his or her knowledge, which eventually can be put to practical or experimental use. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Biology 302 Laboratory)

Subjects

biology | lab | tissues | integumentary system | axial skeleton | appendicular skeleton | muscular system | nervous system | senses | circulatory system | respiratory system | digestive system | urinary system | reproductive system | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Neurobiology

Description

This course is designed to provide an overview of neurobiology - the biology of our nervous system, from the spinal cord to the brain, and everything in between. After a general introduction and review of pertinent scientific concepts, the student will take a look at cellular signaling, neuron development and plasticity, and the larger systems of neurobiology, such as the sensory system, motor system, and the complex phenomena of memory and emotion. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Biology 303)

Subjects

biology | neurobiology | nervous system | synapyses | neurotransmitters | neural plasticity | neuroanatomy | senses | somatic | motor system | brain | electrical signaling | cortical | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT)

Description

Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa

Subjects

Anthropology | culture | embodiment | senses | historical | cross-cultural analysis | politics | sensory experience | western philosophical debates | mind | brain | emotion | body | sight | reason | rationality | smell | taste | touch | knowing | knowledge production | scientific interpretations | western philosophical | physiological models | individual physiological | psychological responses | social relations | power relations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.00 Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

human behavior | brain | perception | memory | motivation | emotion | learning | senses | sensation | cognition | thinking | language | intelligence | love | evolution | attitude | behavior | self | dissociation | repression | morality | Freud | sleep | dreams | mental illness | fairy tale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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