Searching for sensors : 147 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6

3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT) 3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | thin films | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT) 2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included. This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | probability | probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | light statistics | light statistics | theory of light coherence | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information-theoretic views | information theory | information theory | 2.717 | 2.717 | MAS.857 | MAS.857

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | electromagnetic forces | actuators | actuators | sensors | sensors | TEM lines | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | antennas | antennas | radiation | radiation | optical communications | optical communications | acoustics | acoustics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

SP.293 Lego Robotics (MIT) SP.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors. LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | sensors | sensors | building techniques | building techniques | motors | motors | gearing | gearing | Handyboards | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ES.293 Lego Robotics (MIT) ES.293 Lego Robotics (MIT)

Description

LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors. LEGO® robotics uses LEGO®s as a fun tool to explore robotics, mechanical systems, electronics, and programming. This seminar is primarily a lab experience which provides students with resources to design, build, and program functional robots constructed from LEGO®s and a few other parts such as motors and sensors.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | robotics | robotics | sensors | sensors | building techniques | building techniques | motors | motors | gearing | gearing | Handyboards | Handyboards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ES.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J) (MIT) 20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J) (MIT)

Description

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S

Subjects

Analysis | Analysis | design | design | molecular scale | molecular scale | biological systems | biological systems | biotechnology | biotechnology | biomedical engineering | biomedical engineering | molecular interactions | molecular interactions | synthetic molecules | synthetic molecules | synthesis | synthesis | processing approaches | processing approaches | cell functions | cell functions | materials science | materials science | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | drug delivery | drug delivery | biosensors | biosensors | cell-guiding surfaces | cell-guiding surfaces | BE.462J | BE.462J | BE.462 | BE.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.270 Autonomous Robot Design Competition (MIT) 6.270 Autonomous Robot Design Competition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. 6.270 is a hands-on, learn-by-doing class, in which participants design and build a robot that will play in a competition at the end of January. The goal for the students is to design a machine that will be able to navigate its way around the playing surface, recognize other opponents, and manipulate game objects. Unlike the machines in Design and Manufacturing I (2.007), 6.270 robots are totally autonomous, so once a round begins, there is no human intervention.The goal of 6.270 is to teach students about robotic design by giving them the hardware, software, and information they need to design, build, and debug their own robot. The subject includes concepts and applications that are related to various MIT classes (e.g. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. 6.270 is a hands-on, learn-by-doing class, in which participants design and build a robot that will play in a competition at the end of January. The goal for the students is to design a machine that will be able to navigate its way around the playing surface, recognize other opponents, and manipulate game objects. Unlike the machines in Design and Manufacturing I (2.007), 6.270 robots are totally autonomous, so once a round begins, there is no human intervention.The goal of 6.270 is to teach students about robotic design by giving them the hardware, software, and information they need to design, build, and debug their own robot. The subject includes concepts and applications that are related to various MIT classes (e.g.

Subjects

lego | lego | robot | robot | soldering | soldering | contest | contest | gearboxes | gearboxes | motors | motors | sensors | sensors | c code | c code | IR LEDs | IR LEDs | shaft encoding | shaft encoding | handy board | handy board

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.019 Design of Ocean Systems I (13.017) (MIT) 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems I (13.017) (MIT)

Description

A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation of the system, including demonstration of its operation in the marine environment. Spring Term: Introduction to the design process and its application to ocean engineering. Design project with students developing system definition and completing its preliminary design. Students are instructed in the design process, embedded systems programming and interfacing techniques, sensors, actuators, and the control of marine systems. Communications skills are honed through written and oral reports and engineering ethics are discussed. Fall Term: Students work as a group to desig

Subjects

design process | design process | model-scale ocean system | model-scale ocean system | operation in marine environment | operation in marine environment | system definition | system definition | preliminary design | preliminary design | embedded systems programming | embedded systems programming | interfacing techniques | interfacing techniques | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | marine systems | marine systems | engineering ethics | engineering ethics | system specification | system specification | group dynamics | group dynamics | time management | time management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT) BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S

Subjects

Analysis | Analysis | design | design | molecular scale | molecular scale | biological systems | biological systems | biotechnology | biotechnology | biomedical engineering | biomedical engineering | molecular interactions | molecular interactions | synthetic molecules | synthetic molecules | synthesis | synthesis | processing approaches | processing approaches | cell functions | cell functions | materials science | materials science | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | drug delivery | drug delivery | biosensors | biosensors | cell-guiding surfaces | cell-guiding surfaces | 3.962J | 3.962J | BE.462 | BE.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | material properties | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | sensing methods | fluid flow | microscale transport | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | actuators | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT) EC.S06 Practical Electronics (MIT)

Description

You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project. You can build a wide range of practical electronic devices if you understand a few basic electronics concepts and follow some simple rules. These devices include light-activated and sound-activated toys and appliances, remote controls, timers and clocks, and motorized devices. The subject begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts, followed by a series of laboratory exercises that demonstrate the basic rules, and a final project.

Subjects

Electronics | Electronics | circuit | circuit | analog circuits | analog circuits | testing circuits | testing circuits | bridge circuits | bridge circuits | passive components | passive components | resistors | resistors | diodes | diodes | capacitors | capacitors | filters | filters | flip-flops | flip-flops | relays | relays | transistors | transistors | switches | switches | rectifiers | rectifiers | function generators | function generators | comparators | comparators | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | op-amps | op-amps | timing circuits | timing circuits | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | electronics | electronics | SP.764 | SP.764 | SP.765 | SP.765

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions.

Subjects

ESD.013 | ESD.013 | electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave communications | microwave communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT) 1.212J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (MIT)

Description

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact. The readings for the class come primarily from the instructor's own text: Sussman, Joseph. Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). New York, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) represent a major transition in transportation on many dimensions. This course considers ITS as a lens through which one can view many transportation and societal issues. ITS is an international program intended to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surface transportation systems through advanced technologies in information systems, communications, and sensors. In the United States, ITS represents the major post-Interstate-era program for advancing surface transportation in highways and public transportation, and is potentially comparable to the air traffic control system in impact. The readings for the class come primarily from the instructor's own text: Sussman, Joseph. Perspectives on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). New York,

Subjects

intelligent transportation systems | intelligent transportation systems | ITS | ITS | technological systems | technological systems | institutional aspects of ITS | institutional aspects of ITS | system architecture | system architecture | congestion pricing | congestion pricing | public | public | Surface transportation systems | Surface transportation systems | information systems | information systems | communications | communications | sensors | sensors | post-Interstate | post-Interstate | highways | highways | public transportation | public transportation | network models | network models | 1.212 | 1.212 | ESD.221 | ESD.221 | public partnerships | public partnerships | private partnerships | private partnerships | industrial policy | industrial policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-transportation.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave | microwave | communications | communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy | microwave communications | microwave communications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT) 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials and construction for ocean use, electronics, sensors, and actuators. Student teams work within schedule and budget, setting goals, reviewing progress, and making regular and final presentations. Instruction and practice occur in oral and written communication. This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials and construction for ocean use, electronics, sensors, and actuators. Student teams work within schedule and budget, setting goals, reviewing progress, and making regular and final presentations. Instruction and practice occur in oral and written communication.

Subjects

hydrodynamics | hydrodynamics | power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles | power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles | environment | environment | electronics | electronics | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sea-keeping | sea-keeping | hull strength | hull strength | physics of acoustics | physics of acoustics | resistance | resistance | propulsion | propulsion | control surfaces | control surfaces | dynamics | dynamics | feedback control | feedback control | graphical information systems | graphical information systems | GIS | GIS

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.973 Organic Optoelectronics (MIT) 6.973 Organic Optoelectronics (MIT)

Description

The course examines optical and electronic processes in organic molecules and polymers that govern the behavior of practical organic optoelectronic devices. Electronic structure of a single organic molecule is used as a guide to the electronic behavior of organic aggregate structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of organic thin films in active organic devices including organic LEDs, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, chemical sensors, memory cells, electrochromic devices, as well as xerography and organic non-linear optics. How to reach the ultimate miniaturization limit of molecular electronics and related nanoscale patterning techniques of organic materials will also be discussed. The class encompasses three laboratory sessions during which the students will practice the use of The course examines optical and electronic processes in organic molecules and polymers that govern the behavior of practical organic optoelectronic devices. Electronic structure of a single organic molecule is used as a guide to the electronic behavior of organic aggregate structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of organic thin films in active organic devices including organic LEDs, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, chemical sensors, memory cells, electrochromic devices, as well as xerography and organic non-linear optics. How to reach the ultimate miniaturization limit of molecular electronics and related nanoscale patterning techniques of organic materials will also be discussed. The class encompasses three laboratory sessions during which the students will practice the use of

Subjects

organic optoelectronics | organic optoelectronics | optical | optical | electronic | electronic | polymers | polymers | organic thin films | organic thin films | organic LEDs | organic LEDs | solar cells | solar cells | photodetectors | photodetectors | transistors | transistors | chemical sensors | chemical sensors | memory cells | memory cells | electrochromic devices | electrochromic devices | xerography | xerography | organic non-linear optics | organic non-linear optics | miniaturization limit | miniaturization limit | molecular electronics | molecular electronics | nanoscale patterning | nanoscale patterning | vacuum organic deposition | vacuum organic deposition | non-vacuum organic deposition | non-vacuum organic deposition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials. This course explores the phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level and the relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics covered include elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, and fatigue. Case studies and examples are drawn from structural and functional applications that include a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata