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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page. This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology; | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | discovery | discovery | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | genetics | genetics | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science | race | race | ethics | ethics | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | warfare | warfare | evolution | evolution | Freud | Freud | Einstein | Einstein | Darwin | Darwin | experiment | experiment | eugenics | eugenics | technology and society | technology and society | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course will study the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. It will not focus on discoveries and their discoverers. Instead, it will examine: What is science? How has science been practiced, and by whom? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science and society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medicine, psychology, and computer science. This course will study the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. It will not focus on discoveries and their discoverers. Instead, it will examine: What is science? How has science been practiced, and by whom? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science and society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medicine, psychology, and computer science.

Subjects

Science | Science | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | Europe | Europe | United States | United States | practice | practice | discoveries | discoveries | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT) 21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT)

Description

This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie

Subjects

folk music | folk music | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | British Isles | British Isles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | 21M.223 | 21M.223

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT) 4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies. This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | housing | urban planning | urban planning | city development | city development | urban history | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | New York City | London | London | Paris | Paris | tenements | tenements | slums | slums | row houses | row houses | court and garden | court and garden | country estate | country estate | urban development | urban development | modernism | modernism | city planning | city planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT) 21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT)

Description

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans. In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subjects

history | history | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | conquest | conquest | colonization | colonization | Americas | Americas | native people | native people | Guatemala | Guatemala | Canada | Canada | Brazil | Brazil | Panama | Panama | colonial New England | colonial New England | Jesuit | Jesuit | mission | mission | Huron | Huron | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | politics | politics | Kuna | Kuna | twentieth century | twentieth century | conflict | conflict | europe | europe | indian | indian | native americans | native americans | missions | missions

License

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT) 21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT)

Description

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives. This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subjects

21L.423 | 21L.423 | 21M.223 | 21M.223 | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | folk music | folk music | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 17th century | 17th century | 18th century | 18th century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | Lomax | Lomax | ballad | ballad | anglo-scottish ballads | anglo-scottish ballads | fiddle | fiddle | the great confluence | the great confluence | appalachia | appalachia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | poetic language | poetic language | figurative language | figurative language | Aristotle | Aristotle | literary theory | literary theory | history | history | early modern | early modern | metaphor | metaphor | science | science | renaissance | renaissance | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Marvell | Marvell | Milton | Milton | Romantic period | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Coleridge | Keats | Keats | early twentieth-century | early twentieth-century | Yeats | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | Phillip Larkin | poems | poems | normative | normative | literal | literal | literary criticism | literary criticism | critical method | critical method | interpretation | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | urban planning | city development | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | London | Paris | tenements | slums | row houses | court and garden | country estate | urban development | modernism | city planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology | society | modern | seventeenth century | present | discovery | progress | history | physics | chemistry | biology | genetics | geology | medicine | psychology | computer science | race | ethics | scientific revolution | warfare | evolution | Freud | Einstein | Darwin | experiment | eugenics | technology and society | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course will study the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. It will not focus on discoveries and their discoverers. Instead, it will examine: What is science? How has science been practiced, and by whom? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science and society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medicine, psychology, and computer science.

Subjects

Science | technology | society | modern | seventeenth century | present | Europe | United States | practice | discoveries | progress | history | physics | chemistry | biology | geology | medicine | psychology | computer science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT)

Description

This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie

Subjects

folk music | music production | music transmission | music preservation | British Isles | seventeenth century | folk revival | balladry | fiddle styles | 21M.223

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | urban planning | city development | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | London | Paris | tenements | slums | row houses | court and garden | country estate | urban development | modernism | city planning

License

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21A.441 The Conquest of America (MIT)

Description

In this course the conquest and colonization of the Americas is considered, with special attention to the struggles of native peoples in Guatemala, Canada, Brazil, Panama, and colonial New England. In two segments of the course-one devoted to the Jesuit missionization of the Huron in the 1630s, the other to struggles between the government of Panama and the Kuna between 1900 and 1925-students examine primary documents such as letters, reports, and court records, to draw their own conclusions. Attention focuses on how we know about and represent past eras and other peoples, as well as on the history of struggles between native Americans and Europeans.

Subjects

history | cultural anthropology | conquest | colonization | Americas | native people | Guatemala | Canada | Brazil | Panama | colonial New England | Jesuit | mission | Huron | seventeenth century | politics | Kuna | twentieth century | conflict | europe | indian | native americans | missions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | early modern | Russia | history | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | international relations | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | society | Asia | foreign influences | foreign relations | Russian history | social relations | nobility | peasantry | town | country | women | men | political | religious | economic | social factors | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | government | time of troubles | seventeenth century | 17th century | eighteenth century | 18th century | politics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT)

Description

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subjects

21L.423 | 21M.223 | music production | music transmission | music preservation | folk music | British Isles | North America | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | 17th century | 18th century | folk revival | balladry | fiddle styles | Lomax | ballad | anglo-scottish ballads | fiddle | the great confluence | appalachia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Interpreting Poetry (MIT)

Description

This seminar offers a course of readings in lyric poetry. It aims to enhance the student's capacity to understand the nature of poetic language and the enjoyment of poetic texts by treating poems as messages to be deciphered. The seminar will briefly touch upon the history of theories of figurative language since Aristotle and it will attend to the development of those theories during the last thirty years, noting the manner in which they tended to consider figures of speech distinct from normative or literal expression, and it will devote particular attention to the rise of theories that quarrel with this distinction. The seminar also aims to communicate a rough sense of the history of English-speaking poetry since the early modern period. Some attention will be paid as well to the

Subjects

literature | lyric poetry | poetic language | figurative language | Aristotle | literary theory | history | early modern | metaphor | science | renaissance | seventeenth century | Shakespeare | Donne | Marvell | Milton | Romantic period | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Keats | early twentieth-century | Yeats | T.S. Eliot | Wallace Stevens | Robert Frost | Elizabeth Bishop | Phillip Larkin | poems | normative | literal | literary criticism | critical method | interpretation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | creole | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | identity | africa | europe | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | colony | colonial | dialect | grench | new world | slavery | lexicon | pidgin | culture | religion | music | literature | ethnicity | text | syntax | morphology | uniformity | ebonics | africal-american english | gullah | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | creole | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | identity | africa | europe | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | colony | colonial | dialect | grench | new world | slavery | lexicon | pidgin | culture | religion | music | literature | ethnicity | text | syntax | morphology | uniformity | ebonics | africal-american english | gullah | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | early modern | Russia | history | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | international relations | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | society | Asia | foreign influences | foreign relations | Russian history | social relations | nobility | peasantry | town | country | women | men | political | religious | economic | social factors | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | government | time of troubles | seventeenth century | 17th century | eighteenth century | 18th century | politics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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