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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma

Subjects

women | women | gender studies | gender studies | sexual identity | sexual identity | gender identities | gender identities | gender | gender | queer | queer | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | queer studies | queer studies | gay | gay | lesbian | lesbian | straight identities | straight identities | sexual practices | sexual practices | sexuality | sexuality | freud | freud | foucault | foucault | sedgwick | sedgwick | rubin | rubin | butler | butler | homosexuality | homosexuality | homosexual | homosexual | gay marriage | gay marriage | AIDs | AIDs | feminism | feminism

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21A.231J Gender, Sexuality, and Society (MIT) 21A.231J Gender, Sexuality, and Society (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to examine how people experience gender - what it means to be a man or a woman - and sexuality in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. We will explore how gender and sexuality relate to other categories of social identity and difference, such as race and ethnicity, economic and social standing, urban or rural life, etc. One goal of the class is to learn how to critically assess media and other popular representations of gender roles and stereotypes. Another is to gain a greater sense of the diversity of human social practices and beliefs in the United States and around the world. This course seeks to examine how people experience gender - what it means to be a man or a woman - and sexuality in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. We will explore how gender and sexuality relate to other categories of social identity and difference, such as race and ethnicity, economic and social standing, urban or rural life, etc. One goal of the class is to learn how to critically assess media and other popular representations of gender roles and stereotypes. Another is to gain a greater sense of the diversity of human social practices and beliefs in the United States and around the world.

Subjects

21A.231 | 21A.231 | WGS.455 | WGS.455 | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | marriage | marriage | nationalism | nationalism | race | race | class | class | sex | sex | globalization | globalization | professionalization | professionalization | agency | agency | appetite | appetite | identity | identity | transvestite | transvestite | transgender | transgender | intersexuality | intersexuality | motherhood | motherhood | fetus | fetus | sexism | sexism | SP.455J | SP.455J | SP.455 | SP.455

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

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17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | political theory | political theory | modern society | modern society | citizenship | citizenship | women | women | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | class | class | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | power | power | culture | culture | morality | morality | gender | gender | modern life | modern life | feminist scholarship | feminist scholarship | public | public | private | private | roles | roles | civil society | civil society | political culture | political culture | WMN.412J | WMN.412J | 17.118 | 17.118 | SP.412 | SP.412 | WMN.412 | WMN.412

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | language | language | sexuality | sexuality | feminist analysis | feminist analysis

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender | gender | transsexual | transsexual | women's movement | women's movement | women's rights | women's rights | declaration of independence | declaration of independence | madness | madness | illness | illness | patriarchy | patriarchy | female pathology | female pathology | socialization | socialization | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | gender roles | gender roles | social construction | social construction | biological essentialism | biological essentialism | embodiment | embodiment | body image | body image | representation of women | representation of women | sexuality | sexuality | reproductive politics | reproductive politics | work | work | violence | violence | feminism | feminism

License

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

Sex | Sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

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21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT) 21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT)

Description

How can the individual be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action and also a social product? Why are some people accepted and celebrated for their particular features while other people and behaviors are considered deviant and stigmatized? This course examines theoretical perspectives on human identity, focusing on processes of creating categories of acceptable and deviant identities. We will discuss how identities are formed, how they vary, the forms and possibilities of unique or aggregate identities, how behaviors are labeled deviant, how people enter deviant roles and worlds, responses to differences and strategies of coping with these responses on the individual and group level. Rather than focus on the differences among various forms of deviant How can the individual be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action and also a social product? Why are some people accepted and celebrated for their particular features while other people and behaviors are considered deviant and stigmatized? This course examines theoretical perspectives on human identity, focusing on processes of creating categories of acceptable and deviant identities. We will discuss how identities are formed, how they vary, the forms and possibilities of unique or aggregate identities, how behaviors are labeled deviant, how people enter deviant roles and worlds, responses to differences and strategies of coping with these responses on the individual and group level. Rather than focus on the differences among various forms of deviant

Subjects

human identity | human identity | deviance | deviance | conformity | conformity | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | WMN.454J | WMN.454J | 21A.218 | 21A.218 | SP.454 | SP.454 | WMN.454 | WMN.454

License

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others). In this course you will learn to "r This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others). In this course you will learn to "r

Subjects

women | women | gender | gender | women's studies | women's studies | feminist | feminist | sexism | sexism | racism | racism | classism | classism | ethnocentrism | ethnocentrism | homophobia | homophobia | heterosexism | heterosexism | transphobia | transphobia | ableism | ableism | women's reproduction | women's reproduction | sexuality | sexuality | families | families | motherhood | motherhood | globalization | globalization | body image | body image | activism | activism | socialization | socialization | feminism | feminism | oppression | oppression | WMN.401 | WMN.401

License

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | famly | famly | vengeance | vengeance | retribution | retribution | reform | reform | punishment | punishment | prison | prison | body | body | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality

License

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

workshop | workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate | SP.576 | SP.576

License

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

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17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT) 17.S914 Conversations You Can't Have on Campus: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Identity (MIT)

Description

What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more. What is race? What is ethnicity? How can communication and relationships between men and women be improved? What causes segregation in our society? How do stereotypes develop and why do they persist? How do an individual's racial, ethnic, and sexual identities form and develop? This course explores these topics and more.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | affirmative action | affirmative action | religion | religion | sexuality | sexuality | evolution | evolution | creationism | creationism | prostitution | prostitution | beauty | beauty | meaning of life | meaning of life | health care | health care | euthanasia | euthanasia | gender | gender | race | race

License

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9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.250 Evolutionary Psychology (MIT) 9.250 Evolutionary Psychology (MIT)

Description

Current research on the evolution and development of cognition and affect, including intuitive physics, biology, and psychology, language, emotions, sexuality, and social relations. Current research on the evolution and development of cognition and affect, including intuitive physics, biology, and psychology, language, emotions, sexuality, and social relations.

Subjects

evolution | evolution | development of cognition | development of cognition | affect | affect | intuitive physics | intuitive physics | biology | biology | psychology | psychology | language | language | emotions | emotions | sexuality | sexuality | social relations | social relations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.232J Rethinking the Family, Sex, and Gender (MIT) 21A.232J Rethinking the Family, Sex, and Gender (MIT)

Description

Through investigating cross-cultural case studies, this course introduces students to the anthropological study of the social institutions and symbolic meanings of family, household, gender, and sexuality. We will explore the myriad forms that families and households take and evaluate their social, emotional, and economic dynamics. Through investigating cross-cultural case studies, this course introduces students to the anthropological study of the social institutions and symbolic meanings of family, household, gender, and sexuality. We will explore the myriad forms that families and households take and evaluate their social, emotional, and economic dynamics.

Subjects

21A.232 | 21A.232 | WGS.172 | WGS.172 | family | family | sex | sex | gender | gender | anthropology | anthropology | household | household | sexuality | sexuality | social institutions | social institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT) 21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology? This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Subjects

speculative fiction | speculative fiction | vampires | vampires | cyborgs | cyborgs | utopias | utopias | dystopias | dystopias | time travel | time travel | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | futurism | futurism | reproduction | reproduction | extraterrestrials | extraterrestrials | race | race | religion | religion | alienation | alienation | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT) 21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT)

Description

This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product. This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product.

Subjects

21A.218 | 21A.218 | WGS.170 | WGS.170 | class | class | social interaction | social interaction | discourse | discourse | performance | performance | bodies | bodies | conformity | conformity | deviance | deviance | gender | gender | biology | biology | culture | culture | race | race | constructivism | constructivism | essentialism | essentialism | structuralism | structuralism | incarceration | incarceration | religion | religion | food | food | group membership | group membership | sexuality | sexuality | ethnicity | ethnicity | institution | institution | identity formation | identity formation | stigma | stigma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT) 21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT)

Description

We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate. We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate.

Subjects

21A.230 | 21A.230 | WGS.456 | WGS.456 | ameican family | ameican family | anthropology | anthropology | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | united states | united states | class | class | ethnicity | ethnicity | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | marriage | marriage | parenting | parenting | divorce | divorce | violence | violence | economics | economics | poverty | poverty | policy | policy | values | values | welfare | welfare | day care | day care | SP.456J | SP.456J | WMN.456J | WMN.456J | SP.456 | SP.456 | WMN.456 | WMN.456

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality | pornography | pornography | free speech | free speech | hate speech | hate speech

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender studies | gender studies | division of labor | division of labor | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | power | power | authority | authority | gender equality | gender equality | feminism | feminism | sexuality | sexuality | social construction | social construction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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