Searching for social : 1867 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75

17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism. In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | social capital | civil society | civil society | social networks | social networks | community norms | community norms | associational activities | associational activities | state | state | democracy | democracy | government | government | economic development | economic development | social welfare | social welfare | democratization | democratization | pluralism | pluralism | public goods provision | public goods provision | state capacity | state capacity | international politics | international politics | globalization | globalization | social sanctions | social sanctions | political participation | political participation | social movements | social movements | civic engagement | civic engagement | politics | politics | political science | political science | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social justice | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.930J Social Studies of Bioscience and Biotech (MIT) HST.930J Social Studies of Bioscience and Biotech (MIT)

Description

In this course, social, ethical and clinical issues associated with the development of new biotechnologies and their integration into clinical practice is discussed. Basic scientists, clinicians, bioethicists, and social scientists present on the following four general topics: changing political economy of biotech research; problems associated with the adaption of new biotechnologies and findings from molecular biology for clinical settings; the ethical issues that emerge from clinical research and clinical use of new technologies; and the broader social ethics of access and inequality. In this course, social, ethical and clinical issues associated with the development of new biotechnologies and their integration into clinical practice is discussed. Basic scientists, clinicians, bioethicists, and social scientists present on the following four general topics: changing political economy of biotech research; problems associated with the adaption of new biotechnologies and findings from molecular biology for clinical settings; the ethical issues that emerge from clinical research and clinical use of new technologies; and the broader social ethics of access and inequality.

Subjects

HST.930 | HST.930 | STS.449 | STS.449 | social medicine | social medicine | social studies | social studies | ethics | ethics | social issues | social issues | medical ethics | medical ethics | informed consent | informed consent | risk society | risk society | social ethics | social ethics | clinical research | clinical research | medical anthropology | medical anthropology | bioethics | bioethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Estructura Social (2014) Estructura Social (2014)

Description

Se trata de una asignatura obligatoria en el Grado de Marketing, con una carga lectiva de 6 créditos ECTS, que se imparte en el primer curso. La asignatura, adscrita al Departamento de Sociología y Trabajo Social, pretende contribuir al desarrollo del perfil profesional aportando las competencias necesarias para comprender los conceptos y enfoques teóricos y prácticos relacionados con la Estructura Social, así como reconocer e identificar los procesos estructurales básicos de las sociedades avanzadas. En su vertiente más práctica, la asignatura permitirá analizar e interpretar factores y elementos estructurales de la realidad social contemporánea, utilizando las fuentes estadísticas y los recursos metodológicos disponibles. Se trata de una asignatura obligatoria en el Grado de Marketing, con una carga lectiva de 6 créditos ECTS, que se imparte en el primer curso. La asignatura, adscrita al Departamento de Sociología y Trabajo Social, pretende contribuir al desarrollo del perfil profesional aportando las competencias necesarias para comprender los conceptos y enfoques teóricos y prácticos relacionados con la Estructura Social, así como reconocer e identificar los procesos estructurales básicos de las sociedades avanzadas. En su vertiente más práctica, la asignatura permitirá analizar e interpretar factores y elementos estructurales de la realidad social contemporánea, utilizando las fuentes estadísticas y los recursos metodológicos disponibles.

Subjects

ón social | ón social | mercado de trabajo | mercado de trabajo | Estructura social | Estructura social | Cambio social | Cambio social | problemas sociales | problemas sociales | Desigualdad | Desigualdad | ía | ía

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.um.es/rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ón y Desarrollo de Redes Sociales (2015) ón y Desarrollo de Redes Sociales (2015)

Description

En el contexto del grado de Educación Social, la asignatura Creación y desarrollo de Redes Sociales, forma parte de la materia denominada Creación de Redes Sociales. Esta asignatura tiene como finalidad principal el conocimiento del trabajo mediante Redes Sociales, de manera que el alumno adquiera las competencias para comprender, crear, desarrollar y dinamizar una red social. Naturalmente esta asignatura no abarca la totalidad de contenidos que, a estos efectos, precisará un Educador Social en su desempeño profesional. Una parte importante de los aprendizajes se producirán a lo largo de la carrera profesional, con los cuales han de estar conectados. Ahora bien, se han incluido aquellos contenidos que permiten una aproximación conceptual al contexto en que normalmente dicho profesio En el contexto del grado de Educación Social, la asignatura Creación y desarrollo de Redes Sociales, forma parte de la materia denominada Creación de Redes Sociales. Esta asignatura tiene como finalidad principal el conocimiento del trabajo mediante Redes Sociales, de manera que el alumno adquiera las competencias para comprender, crear, desarrollar y dinamizar una red social. Naturalmente esta asignatura no abarca la totalidad de contenidos que, a estos efectos, precisará un Educador Social en su desempeño profesional. Una parte importante de los aprendizajes se producirán a lo largo de la carrera profesional, con los cuales han de estar conectados. Ahora bien, se han incluido aquellos contenidos que permiten una aproximación conceptual al contexto en que normalmente dicho profesio

Subjects

ón Social | ón Social | trabajo en red | trabajo en red | ía e Historia de la Educación | ía e Historia de la Educación | movimientos sociales | movimientos sociales | Red social | Red social | interdependencia | interdependencia | ía de redes | ía de redes | ón social | ón social | Historia del Pensamiento y de los Movimientos Sociales | Historia del Pensamiento y de los Movimientos Sociales | ía | ía

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.um.es/rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | civil society | social networks | community norms | associational activities | state | democracy | government | economic development | social welfare | democratization | pluralism | public goods provision | state capacity | international politics | globalization | social sanctions | political participation | social movements | civic engagement | politics | political science | ethnic conflict | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

James McClarence alias Henry Noble, labourer, arrested for stealing clothes James McClarence alias Henry Noble, labourer, arrested for stealing clothes

Description

Subjects

portrait | portrait | blur | blur | hat | hat | shirt | shirt | interesting | interesting | scary | scary | mark | mark | coat | coat | grain | grain | surreal | surreal | tie | tie | social | social | historic | historic | criminal | criminal | crime | crime | jacket | jacket | button | button | mugshot | mugshot | stolen | stolen | unusual | unusual | vest | vest | cloth | cloth | theft | theft | seated | seated | tynemouth | tynemouth | policestation | policestation | crease | crease | punishment | punishment | trial | trial | attentive | attentive | accused | accused | arrested | arrested | steal | steal | stealing | stealing | prisoner | prisoner | imprisonment | imprisonment | fascinating | fascinating | digitalimage | digitalimage | sunderland | sunderland | labourer | labourer | cleanshaven | cleanshaven | larceny | larceny | pawnbroker | pawnbroker | convictions | convictions | northshields | northshields | imprisoned | imprisoned | prisontime | prisontime | northtyneside | northtyneside | socialhistory | socialhistory | wellingtonstreet | wellingtonstreet | blackframe | blackframe | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | savillestreet | savillestreet | neutralbackground | neutralbackground | josephfisher | josephfisher | socialheritage | socialheritage | silkhandkerchief | silkhandkerchief | coachlane | coachlane | northshieldspolicecourt | northshieldspolicecourt | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthemen | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthemen | 19021916 | 19021916 | northshieldspolicestation | northshieldspolicestation | theshieldsdailynews | theshieldsdailynews | chiefconstablehuish | chiefconstablehuish | latejmfisher | latejmfisher | missinggoods | missinggoods | magistrate’sclerk | magistrate’sclerk | northumberlandsessions | northumberlandsessions | 1october1906 | 1october1906 | inspectorproud | inspectorproud | jameswilsonveitch | jameswilsonveitch | 24september1906 | 24september1906 | jamesmcclarencealiashenrynoble | jamesmcclarencealiashenrynoble | 18october1906 | 18october1906 | johnmcclarance | johnmcclarance

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=29295370@N07&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | civil society | social networks | community norms | associational activities | state | democracy | government | economic development | social welfare | democratization | pluralism | public goods provision | state capacity | international politics | globalization | social sanctions | political participation | social movements | civic engagement | politics | political science | ethnic conflict | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ón y Drogodependencias (2009) ón y Drogodependencias (2009)

Description

La migración es una cuestión social relativamente novedosa que constituye un campo de estudio que debe abarcar el ámbito interdisciplinar y multidisciplinar, y que plantea nuevos desafíos para la inverstigación desde las instituciones universitarias. El tema de la drogodependencia ha sido ampliamente trabajado desde el ámbito académico; si embargo el fenómenos de las migraciones ha estimulado nuevos retos a los que el investigador debe acercarse con cautela y teniendo en cuenta las diferencias sociales y culturales que se producen según los distintos grupos étnicos. La aproximación de las distintas culturas al fenómeno de las drogas y los patrones de consumo en la población inmigrante teniendo en cuenta las diferencias sociales y culturales son algunos de los temas que es pr La migración es una cuestión social relativamente novedosa que constituye un campo de estudio que debe abarcar el ámbito interdisciplinar y multidisciplinar, y que plantea nuevos desafíos para la inverstigación desde las instituciones universitarias. El tema de la drogodependencia ha sido ampliamente trabajado desde el ámbito académico; si embargo el fenómenos de las migraciones ha estimulado nuevos retos a los que el investigador debe acercarse con cautela y teniendo en cuenta las diferencias sociales y culturales que se producen según los distintos grupos étnicos. La aproximación de las distintas culturas al fenómeno de las drogas y los patrones de consumo en la población inmigrante teniendo en cuenta las diferencias sociales y culturales son algunos de los temas que es pr

Subjects

ítica | ítica | ía Evolutiva y de la Educación | ía Evolutiva y de la Educación | droga | droga | ábitos de consumo | ábitos de consumo | ía Social | ía Social | ía | ía | patrones de consumo | patrones de consumo | drogas | drogas | ón | ón | drogodependencia | drogodependencia | ías | ías | biopsicosocial | biopsicosocial | prejuicios | prejuicios | salud | salud | psicosocial | psicosocial | ía Humana | ía Humana | ónes | ónes | ón inmigrante | ón inmigrante | social | social

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.um.es/rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.15J Networks (MIT) 14.15J Networks (MIT)

Description

Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a

Subjects

networks | networks | crowds | crowds | markets | markets | highly connected world | highly connected world | social networks | social networks | economic networks | economic networks | power networks | power networks | communication networks | communication networks | game theory | game theory | graph theory | graph theory | branching processes | branching processes | random graph models | random graph models | rich get richer phenomena | rich get richer phenomena | power laws | power laws | small worlds | small worlds | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | degree distributions | degree distributions | phase transitions | phase transitions | connectedness | connectedness | and giant component | and giant component | link analysis | link analysis | web search | web search | navigation | navigation | decentralized search | decentralized search | preferential attachment | preferential attachment | epidemics | epidemics | diffusion through networks | diffusion through networks | SIR | SIR | (susceptible | (susceptible | infected | infected | removed) | removed) | SIS | SIS | susceptible) | susceptible) | strategies | strategies | payoffs | payoffs | normal forms | normal forms | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | traffic networks | traffic networks | negative externalities | negative externalities | Braess' paradox | Braess' paradox | potential games | potential games | myopic behavior | myopic behavior | fictitious play | fictitious play | repeated games | repeated games | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | cooperation | cooperation | perfect information | perfect information | imperfect information | imperfect information | positive externalities | positive externalities | strategic complements | strategic complements | path dependence | path dependence | diffusion of innovation | diffusion of innovation | contagion pheonomena | contagion pheonomena | Bayes's rule | Bayes's rule | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | first price auctions | first price auctions | second price auctions | second price auctions | social learning | social learning | Bayesian learning | Bayesian learning | copying | copying | herding | herding | herd behavior | herd behavior | informational cascades | informational cascades | decisions | decisions | social choice | social choice | Condorcet jury theorem | Condorcet jury theorem | political economy | political economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ón, violencia y comportamiento antisocial (2011) ón, violencia y comportamiento antisocial (2011)

Description

Esta asignatura está compuesta por cinco partes diferenciadas: la primera, está orientada a precisar los conceptos de conducta antisocial, agresión y violencia; la segunda, se centra en la conducta inadaptada, en ella se hace un repaso a las perspectivas teóricas más recientes y a la influencia del proceso socializador familiar en el inicio y desarrollo de la conducta antisocial; en la tercera parte, se analiza exhaustivamente el concepto de agresión y los factores implicados en esta conducta; en la cuarta, se estudia su antagónica, la conducta prosocial; por último, en la quinta y última parte, se exponen programas de prevención e intervención psicosocial centrados en la población juvenil. Esta asignatura está compuesta por cinco partes diferenciadas: la primera, está orientada a precisar los conceptos de conducta antisocial, agresión y violencia; la segunda, se centra en la conducta inadaptada, en ella se hace un repaso a las perspectivas teóricas más recientes y a la influencia del proceso socializador familiar en el inicio y desarrollo de la conducta antisocial; en la tercera parte, se analiza exhaustivamente el concepto de agresión y los factores implicados en esta conducta; en la cuarta, se estudia su antagónica, la conducta prosocial; por último, en la quinta y última parte, se exponen programas de prevención e intervención psicosocial centrados en la población juvenil.

Subjects

ón | ón | Derecho Penal | Derecho Penal | violencia | violencia | conducta prosocial | conducta prosocial | ía Evolutiva y de la Educación | ía Evolutiva y de la Educación | delincuencia | delincuencia | Trabajo Social y Servicios Sociales | Trabajo Social y Servicios Sociales | conducta antisocial | conducta antisocial | ón psicosocial | ón psicosocial | ía Social | ía Social | ía | ía

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.um.es/rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Presenting the Freedom of the City to Earl Jellicoe Presenting the Freedom of the City to Earl Jellicoe

Description

Subjects

johngrantham | johngrantham | sheriff | sheriff | newcastleupontyne | newcastleupontyne | 1920s | 1920s | northeastengland | northeastengland | tyneside | tyneside | earljellicoe | earljellicoe | admiralofthefleet | admiralofthefleet | freedomofthecity | freedomofthecity | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | socialhistory | socialhistory | digitalimage | digitalimage | socialheritage | socialheritage | 9november1925 | 9november1925 | servingthecity | servingthecity | service | service | duty | duty | social | social | archives | archives | 1877 | 1877 | blyth | blyth | interesting | interesting | fascinating | fascinating | unusual | unusual | unitedkingdom | unitedkingdom | presentation | presentation | event | event | freedomofthecityofnewcastleupontyne | freedomofthecityofnewcastleupontyne | cityofnewcastleupontyne | cityofnewcastleupontyne | lordmayor | lordmayor | cinemaproprietor | cinemaproprietor | citycouncil | citycouncil | alderman | alderman | 800thanniversary | 800thanniversary | 2016 | 2016 | creationofnewcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | creationofnewcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | interior | interior | room | room | grain | grain | blur | blur | wall | wall | door | door | timber | timber | table | table | chair | chair | uniform | uniform | necklace | necklace | tie | tie | shirt | shirt | moustache | moustache | paper | paper | trophy | trophy | hat | hat | medal | medal | sword | sword | handle | handle | glitter | glitter | portraits | portraits | glass | glass | frame | frame | pen | pen | plate | plate | ornament | ornament | wallpaper | wallpaper | clock | clock | gathering | gathering | standing | standing | attentive | attentive | award | award | ceremony | ceremony | society | society | duties | duties

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=29295370@N07&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.599 Workshop in IT: Collaborative Innovation Networks (MIT) 15.599 Workshop in IT: Collaborative Innovation Networks (MIT)

Description

Diversity begets creativity—in this seminar we tap the amazing power of swarm creativity on the Web by studying and working together as Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs). As interdisciplinary teams of MIT management, SCAD design, University of Cologne informatics, and Aalto University software engineering students we will explore how to discover latest trends on the Web, and how to make them succeed in online social networks. We study a wide range of methods for predictive analytics (coolhunting) and online social marketing (coolfarming), mostly based on social network analysis and the emerging science of collaboration. Students will also learn to use our own unique MIT-developed Condor tool for Web mining, social network analysis, and trend prediction. Diversity begets creativity—in this seminar we tap the amazing power of swarm creativity on the Web by studying and working together as Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs). As interdisciplinary teams of MIT management, SCAD design, University of Cologne informatics, and Aalto University software engineering students we will explore how to discover latest trends on the Web, and how to make them succeed in online social networks. We study a wide range of methods for predictive analytics (coolhunting) and online social marketing (coolfarming), mostly based on social network analysis and the emerging science of collaboration. Students will also learn to use our own unique MIT-developed Condor tool for Web mining, social network analysis, and trend prediction.

Subjects

collaborative innovation networks | collaborative innovation networks | social networks | social networks | social marketing | social marketing | Web | Web | swarm creativity | swarm creativity | predictive analytics | predictive analytics | Web trends | Web trends | Facebook | Facebook | email | email | Web mining | Web mining | social network analysis | social network analysis | trend predictions | trend predictions | viral marketing | viral marketing | global virtual collaboration | global virtual collaboration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.961 Designing Sociable Media (MIT) MAS.961 Designing Sociable Media (MIT)

Description

Subjects

on-line communities | on-line communities | virtual world | virtual world | social cues | social cues | cultural mores and structures | cultural mores and structures | interaction | interaction | interface | interface | internet | internet | socializing | socializing | social life in the on-line world | social life in the on-line world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Webometrics: The Evolution of a Digital Social Science Research Field

Description

Mike Thelwall's Keynote talk from the OII Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", March 2012. This is a Keynote talk from the Oxford Internet Institute's Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", held in Oxford on 12 March 2012. The research field of webometrics encompasses various forms of web-based link and text analyses. Webometric studies have included large scale analyses of social network sites and social web sites like Flickr, Twitter and YouTube, as well as areas of the traditional web, such as university websites. Webometrics began in 1997 within the discipline of Library and Information Science (LIS) in response to the recognition that commercial search engines could turn the Web into a large database f Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social media | link analysis | knowledge | information | internet | science | digital | text analysis | research | social | policy | webmetrics | technology | web data | social science | social media | link analysis | knowledge | information | internet | science | digital | text analysis | research | social | policy | webmetrics | technology | web data | social science | 2012-03-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Computational Perspectives on the Structure and Information Flows in Online Networks

Description

In this talk, Jure discusses how the computational perspective can be applied to questions involving the structure of online networks and the dynamics of information that flow through such networks. With an increasing amount of social interaction taking place online, we are accumulating large amounts of data about phenomena that were once essentially invisible to us: the collective behaviour and social interactions of hundreds of millions of people. Analyzing this data computationally offers enormous potential to address both long-standing scientific questions, and to harness and inform the design of future social computing applications.

Subjects

Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data | ukoer | Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | data | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://rss.oucs.ox.ac.uk/internet/all-audio/rss20.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Computational Perspectives on the Structure and Information Flows in Online Networks

Description

In this talk, Jure Leskovec discusses how the computational perspective can be applied to questions involving the structure of online networks and the dynamics of information that flow through such networks. With an increasing amount of social interaction taking place online, we are accumulating large amounts of data about phenomena that were once essentially invisible to us: the collective behaviour and social interactions of hundreds of millions of people. Analyzing this data computationally offers enormous potential to address both long-standing scientific questions, and to harness and inform the design of future social computing applications.

Subjects

Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data | ukoer | Internet | social interaction | data | Web 2.0 | collective action | social behaviour | machine | computation | analysis | data | information | networks | social networks | structure | information flow | big data

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://rss.oucs.ox.ac.uk/internet/all-video/rss20.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Webometrics: The Evolution of a Digital Social Science Research Field

Description

Mike Thelwall's Keynote talk from the OII Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", March 2012. This is a Keynote talk from the Oxford Internet Institute's Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", held in Oxford on 12 March 2012. The research field of webometrics encompasses various forms of web-based link and text analyses. Webometric studies have included large scale analyses of social network sites and social web sites like Flickr, Twitter and YouTube, as well as areas of the traditional web, such as university websites. Webometrics began in 1997 within the discipline of Library and Information Science (LIS) in response to the recognition that commercial search engines could turn the Web into a large database f Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social media | link analysis | knowledge | information | internet | science | digital | text analysis | research | social | policy | webmetrics | technology | web data | social science | social media | link analysis | knowledge | information | internet | science | digital | text analysis | research | social | policy | webmetrics | technology | web data | social science | 2012-03-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT) 11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial? This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | how society should respond to poverty | race | race | politics of welfare | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | homelessness | crime | crime | drugs | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | social controversy | 1990s | 1990s | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | extra-marital births | extra-marital births | values | values | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | social science research | social science research | public discourse | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata