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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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mean for migrant communities? - COMPAS Breakfast Briefing mean for migrant communities? - COMPAS Breakfast Briefing

Description

The Coalition government's policy agenda on 'the Big Society' marks a major shift in the landscape. It has been described as radically passing power from the state to citizens and civil society. What does it mean for migrants, for migrant community organisations, and for communities where migrants live? What opportunities and threats does it bring for the sector? And is there any evidence yet on the impact of the new agenda? This briefing will be presented by Vaughan Jones, Chief Executive of Praxis, a community-based organisation working with migrants in London. Part of COMPAS Breakfast Briefing series: topical, cutting edge research on migration and migration related issues will be made accessible to an audience of policy makers and other research users. Questions and discussion will The Coalition government's policy agenda on 'the Big Society' marks a major shift in the landscape. It has been described as radically passing power from the state to citizens and civil society. What does it mean for migrants, for migrant community organisations, and for communities where migrants live? What opportunities and threats does it bring for the sector? And is there any evidence yet on the impact of the new agenda? This briefing will be presented by Vaughan Jones, Chief Executive of Praxis, a community-based organisation working with migrants in London. Part of COMPAS Breakfast Briefing series: topical, cutting edge research on migration and migration related issues will be made accessible to an audience of policy makers and other research users. Questions and discussion will

Subjects

compas | compas | immigration | immigration | big society | big society | recession | recession | society | society | migration | migration | politics | politics | compas | immigration | big society | recession | society | migration | politics | 2011-02-11 | compas | immigration | big society | recession | society | migration | politics | 2011-02-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Supporting a Society for the Protection of Animals flag day Supporting a Society for the Protection of Animals flag day

Description

Subjects

1920s | 1920s | dog | dog | men | men | glass | glass | hat | hat | wall | wall | shirt | shirt | standing | standing | pen | pen | 1932 | 1932 | portraits | portraits | table | table | necklace | necklace | interesting | interesting | women | women | shine | shine | lordmayor | lordmayor | dress | dress | darkness | darkness | timber | timber | interior | interior | room | room | board | board | hats | hats | tie | tie | flags | flags | suit | suit | event | event | northumberland | northumberland | fabric | fabric | papers | papers | frame | frame | button | button | gathering | gathering | archives | archives | service | service | unusual | unusual | sheriff | sheriff | 1912 | 1912 | society | society | crease | crease | attentive | attentive | inauguration | inauguration | flagday | flagday | distracted | distracted | newcastleupontyne | newcastleupontyne | fascinating | fascinating | 1877 | 1877 | digitalimage | digitalimage | blyth | blyth | robes | robes | citycouncil | citycouncil | alderman | alderman | councilchamber | councilchamber | 2016 | 2016 | animalwelfare | animalwelfare | socialhistory | socialhistory | animalprotection | animalprotection | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | proceedings | proceedings | 19241925 | 19241925 | northeastofengland | northeastofengland | 19361937 | 19361937 | cityofnewcastle | cityofnewcastle | 800thanniversary | 800thanniversary | cityofnewcastleupontyne | cityofnewcastleupontyne | servingthecity | servingthecity | newcastletownhall | newcastletownhall | protectionofanimals | protectionofanimals | johngrantham | johngrantham | societyfortheprotectionofanimals | societyfortheprotectionofanimals | newcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | newcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | 19june1925 | 19june1925 | northdurhamsociety | northdurhamsociety | cinemaproprietor | cinemaproprietor

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Everyday aesthetics in forced displacement Everyday aesthetics in forced displacement

Description

In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Sandra Dudley (University of Leicester) looks at 'material culture and Karenni forced migrants in a Thai-Burma border camp'. 10 February 2012. In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Sandra Dudley (University of Leicester) looks at 'material culture and Karenni forced migrants in a Thai-Burma border camp'. 10 February 2012.

Subjects

burma | burma | material culture | material culture | anthropology | anthropology | society | society | migration | migration | thailand | thailand | borders | borders | burma | material culture | anthropology | society | migration | thailand | borders | burma | material culture | anthropology | society | migration | thailand | borders

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Opportunistic violence and the impossibility of intimacy Opportunistic violence and the impossibility of intimacy

Description

In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Dhana Hughes (St John's College, University of Oxford) examines 'memories of revenge and denunciation in Sri Lanka's Southern Terror'. 11 May 2012. In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Dhana Hughes (St John's College, University of Oxford) examines 'memories of revenge and denunciation in Sri Lanka's Southern Terror'. 11 May 2012.

Subjects

sri lanka | sri lanka | terror | terror | violence | violence | anthropology | anthropology | society | society | sri lanka | terror | violence | anthropology | society | sri lanka | terror | violence | anthropology | society

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Neighbouring China in Northern Nepal Neighbouring China in Northern Nepal

Description

In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Martin Saxer (National University of Singapore)discusses 'Hidden Valleys, New Roads and Remote Cosmopolitans' in northern Nepal. 25 May 2012. In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Martin Saxer (National University of Singapore)discusses 'Hidden Valleys, New Roads and Remote Cosmopolitans' in northern Nepal. 25 May 2012.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | society | society | borders | borders | nepal | nepal | china | china | anthropology | society | borders | nepal | china | anthropology | society | borders | nepal | china

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Obesity: A Personal View Obesity: A Personal View

Description

Stanley Ulijaszek, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford gives a Nutritional Anthropology talk on Obesity in different cultures around the world. Stanley Ulijaszek, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford gives a Nutritional Anthropology talk on Obesity in different cultures around the world.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | society | society | obesity | obesity | nutrition | nutrition | anthropology | society | obesity | nutrition | anthropology | society | obesity | nutrition

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT) 21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

language | language | china | china | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | writing | writing | speaking | speaking | comprehension | comprehension | culture | culture | society | society | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Measurement of Bodily Transformations (1 Feb 2010) Measurement of Bodily Transformations (1 Feb 2010)

Description

Professor Stanley Ulijaszek, from the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford, gave a talk on 1 February 2010 as part of the Medical Anthropology Research Seminar Series. It was entitled 'Measurement of Bodily Transformations'. Professor Stanley Ulijaszek, from the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford, gave a talk on 1 February 2010 as part of the Medical Anthropology Research Seminar Series. It was entitled 'Measurement of Bodily Transformations'.

Subjects

bodily transformation | bodily transformation | food | food | anthropology | anthropology | society | society | politics | politics | human body | human body | bodily transformation | food | anthropology | society | politics | human body | bodily transformation | food | anthropology | society | politics | human body

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Nutritional Anthropology Lecture 5: Political Ecology of Food Security (15 March 2010) Nutritional Anthropology Lecture 5: Political Ecology of Food Security (15 March 2010)

Description

Professor Stanley Ulijaszek, of the Institute of Cultural Anthropology, Oxford, gave a lecture on 15 March 2010 forming part of the Nutritional Anthropology lecture series. It was entitled 'Political Ecology of Food Security'. Professor Stanley Ulijaszek, of the Institute of Cultural Anthropology, Oxford, gave a lecture on 15 March 2010 forming part of the Nutritional Anthropology lecture series. It was entitled 'Political Ecology of Food Security'.

Subjects

nutrition | nutrition | ecology | ecology | society | society | political ecology | political ecology | anthropology | anthropology | food | food | politics | politics | nutrition | ecology | society | political ecology | anthropology | food | politics | nutrition | ecology | society | political ecology | anthropology | food | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How Universal is Liberalism? How Universal is Liberalism?

Description

Professor Ronald Dworkin, New York University, delivers the 2012 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with response from Professor Sir Adam Roberts, President of the British Academy. Professor Ronald Dworkin, New York University, delivers the 2012 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with response from Professor Sir Adam Roberts, President of the British Academy.

Subjects

liberal | liberal | religion | religion | freedom | freedom | free | free | society | society | speech | speech | politics | politics | law | law | religious | religious | liberal | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | politics | law | religious | 2012-04-27 | liberal | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | politics | law | religious | 2012-04-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Is Nothing Sacred? Free Speech and Religion Is Nothing Sacred? Free Speech and Religion

Description

Professor A C Grayling delivers the 2011 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with responses by Charles Moore and Dr. Usama Hasan. Filmed on 10 June 2011. Professor A C Grayling delivers the 2011 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with responses by Charles Moore and Dr. Usama Hasan. Filmed on 10 June 2011.

Subjects

christian | christian | religion | religion | freedom | freedom | free | free | society | society | speech | speech | expression | expression | respect | respect | politics | politics | law | law | religious | religious | conflict | conflict | islam | islam | christian | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | expression | respect | politics | law | religious | conflict | islam | 2011-06-10 | christian | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | expression | respect | politics | law | religious | conflict | islam | 2011-06-10

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Society (MIT) Society (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

chinese | chinese | language | language | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | culture | culture | china | china | society | society | custom | custom | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.1 Recap of General Philosophy Lecture 1 2.1 Recap of General Philosophy Lecture 1

Description

Part 2.1. A brief recap on the first lecture describing how Aristotle's view of the universe, dominant throughout the middle ages in Europe, came to be gradually phased out by a modern, mechanistic view of the universe. Part 2.1. A brief recap on the first lecture describing how Aristotle's view of the universe, dominant throughout the middle ages in Europe, came to be gradually phased out by a modern, mechanistic view of the universe.

Subjects

christianity | christianity | descartes | descartes | society | society | science | science | philosophy | philosophy | religion | religion | renaissance | renaissance | aristotle | aristotle | mathematics | mathematics | astronomy | astronomy | christianity | descartes | society | science | philosophy | religion | renaissance | aristotle | mathematics | astronomy | christianity | descartes | society | science | philosophy | religion | renaissance | aristotle | mathematics | astronomy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Populism in Modern Constitutions Populism in Modern Constitutions

Description

Richard Parker, Paul W. Williams Professor of Criminal Justice at Harvard Law School, presents his thoughts on how populism has figured in the study and practice of modern American constitutional law and the effect it has had. Opening and closing his remarks with the rallying cry: 'Power to the People!', Professor Parker recalls his involvement in the 'New Left' in the 1960s, his role as a community organizer, and how his activism led to spells in jail. Richard Parker, Paul W. Williams Professor of Criminal Justice at Harvard Law School, presents his thoughts on how populism has figured in the study and practice of modern American constitutional law and the effect it has had. Opening and closing his remarks with the rallying cry: 'Power to the People!', Professor Parker recalls his involvement in the 'New Left' in the 1960s, his role as a community organizer, and how his activism led to spells in jail.

Subjects

society | society | activism | activism | law | law | politics | politics | society | activism | law | politics | society | activism | law | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Transitional (In)justice in Israel/Palestine Transitional (In)justice in Israel/Palestine

Description

Nimer Sultany, University of London, gives a talk for the OTJR seminar series on Monday, 1 June 2015. Nimer Sultany, University of London, gives a talk for the OTJR seminar series on Monday, 1 June 2015.

Subjects

Israel | Israel | palestine | palestine | society | society | justice | justice | israeli occupation | israeli occupation | Gaza | Gaza | injustice | injustice | law | law | politics | politics | Israel | palestine | society | justice | israeli occupation | Gaza | injustice | law | politics | 2015-06-01 | Israel | palestine | society | justice | israeli occupation | Gaza | injustice | law | politics | 2015-06-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The developmental origins of health and disease: adaptation reconsidered The developmental origins of health and disease: adaptation reconsidered

Description

Ian Rickard (Durham) places the origins of the science of health and disease within a framework of evolutionary theory and a medical anthropology perspective (18 January 2016) Ian Rickard (Durham) places the origins of the science of health and disease within a framework of evolutionary theory and a medical anthropology perspective (18 January 2016)

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | society | society | evolution | evolution | science | science | Health | Health | Medicine | Medicine | anthropology | society | evolution | science | Health | Medicine | 2016-01-18 | anthropology | society | evolution | science | Health | Medicine | 2016-01-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Obstructed labour: the classic obstetric dilemma and beyond Obstructed labour: the classic obstetric dilemma and beyond

Description

Emma Pomeroy (Cambridge) places obstructed labour within an evolutionary perspective. A medical anthropology seminar given on 15 February 2016. Emma Pomeroy (Cambridge) places obstructed labour within an evolutionary perspective. A medical anthropology seminar given on 15 February 2016.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | society | society | evolution | evolution | childbirth | childbirth | obstetrics | obstetrics | anthropology | society | evolution | childbirth | obstetrics | 2016-02-15 | anthropology | society | evolution | childbirth | obstetrics | 2016-02-15

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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