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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.703 English Renaissance Drama: Theatre and Society in the Age of Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the Shakespeare "doth bestride the narrow world" of the English Renaissance "like a colossus," leaving his contemporaries "walk under his large legs and peep about" to find themselves in "dishonourable graves." This course aims in part to correct this grave injustice by surveying the extraordinary output of playwrights whose names have largely been eclipsed by their more luminous compatriot: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Ford, among others. Reading Shakespeare as just one of a group of practitioners -- many of whom were more popular than him during and even after his remarkable career -- will restore, I hope, a sense not just of the richness of English Renaissance drama, but also that of the historical and cultural moment of the English Renaissance itself. This course will examine the

Subjects

Shakespeare | Shakespeare | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | Marlowe | Marlowe | Jonson | Jonson | Webster | Webster | Ford | Ford | English Renaissance drama | English Renaissance drama | the relationship between theatre and society | the relationship between theatre and society | culture | culture | aesthetic | aesthetic | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | gender and class dynamics in Renaissance society | money | trade | and colonialism | money | trade | and colonialism | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | the body as metaphor and theatrical ?object? | allegory and aesthetic form | allegory and aesthetic form | theatricality and meta-theatricality | theatricality and meta-theatricality | the private and the public | the private and the public | allegory | allegory | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | drama | drama | gender dynamics | gender dynamics | class dynamics | class dynamics | private | private | public | public | theatrically | theatrically | meta-theatrically | meta-theatrically | money | money | trade | trade | colonialism | colonialism | body | body | metaphor | metaphor | theatre | theatre | society | society | Spanish tragedy | Spanish tragedy | Hamlet | Hamlet | Jew of Malta | Jew of Malta | Alchemist | Alchemist | Duchess of Malfi | Duchess of Malfi | Broken Heart | Broken Heart | Arden of Faversham | Arden of Faversham | Witch of Edmonton | Witch of Edmonton | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Knight of the Burning Pestle | Island Princess | Island Princess

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Supporting a Society for the Protection of Animals flag day Supporting a Society for the Protection of Animals flag day

Description

Subjects

1920s | 1920s | dog | dog | men | men | glass | glass | hat | hat | wall | wall | shirt | shirt | standing | standing | pen | pen | 1932 | 1932 | portraits | portraits | table | table | necklace | necklace | interesting | interesting | women | women | shine | shine | lordmayor | lordmayor | dress | dress | darkness | darkness | timber | timber | interior | interior | room | room | board | board | hats | hats | tie | tie | flags | flags | suit | suit | event | event | northumberland | northumberland | fabric | fabric | papers | papers | frame | frame | button | button | gathering | gathering | archives | archives | service | service | unusual | unusual | sheriff | sheriff | 1912 | 1912 | society | society | crease | crease | attentive | attentive | inauguration | inauguration | flagday | flagday | distracted | distracted | newcastleupontyne | newcastleupontyne | fascinating | fascinating | 1877 | 1877 | digitalimage | digitalimage | blyth | blyth | robes | robes | citycouncil | citycouncil | alderman | alderman | councilchamber | councilchamber | 2016 | 2016 | animalwelfare | animalwelfare | socialhistory | socialhistory | animalprotection | animalprotection | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | proceedings | proceedings | 19241925 | 19241925 | northeastofengland | northeastofengland | 19361937 | 19361937 | cityofnewcastle | cityofnewcastle | 800thanniversary | 800thanniversary | cityofnewcastleupontyne | cityofnewcastleupontyne | servingthecity | servingthecity | newcastletownhall | newcastletownhall | protectionofanimals | protectionofanimals | johngrantham | johngrantham | societyfortheprotectionofanimals | societyfortheprotectionofanimals | newcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | newcastlesmayoraltyandburgesses | 19june1925 | 19june1925 | northdurhamsociety | northdurhamsociety | cinemaproprietor | cinemaproprietor

License

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | Civil War | World War II | Cold War | industrialization | mass production | craftsmanship | transportation | Taylorism | aeronautics | systems approach | computers | control | automation | nature | popular culture | terrorism | rural society | agrarian society | artisan society | industrial society | power | industrial capitalism | factory system | transport | communication | industrial corporation | social relations | production | science-based industry | technology | innovation | process | social criteria | American history | America | technologies | democratic process | political | politics | social | progress | United States | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Neurosociety: what is it with the brain these days? Closing discussion

Description

Steve Woolgar and Paul Woulters give the final talk for the Neuroociety conference

Subjects

neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | 2010-12-08 | ukoer | neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | 2010-12-08

License

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The Social value of neurological reflexivity: decisions, and habits

Description

Jonathan Rowson (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) gives a talk for the Neurosociety conference

Subjects

neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | neurology | 2010-12-08 | ukoer | neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | neurology | 2010-12-08

License

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page. This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology; | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | discovery | discovery | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | genetics | genetics | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science | race | race | ethics | ethics | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | warfare | warfare | evolution | evolution | Freud | Freud | Einstein | Einstein | Darwin | Darwin | experiment | experiment | eugenics | eugenics | technology and society | technology and society | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Who do you think you are? Managing Personhood in a Neurobiological Age

Description

Nikolas Rose (BIOS Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science) gives a keynote speech for the Neurosociety conference

Subjects

neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | identity | neurobiology | 2010-12-07 | ukoer | neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | identity | neurobiology | 2010-12-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Welcome and Opening Remarks

Description

Steve Woolgar and Tanja Schneider (InSIS, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford) give the opening address for the Neurosociety conference

Subjects

neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | 2010-12-07 | ukoer | neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | 2010-12-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.196 Globalization (MIT) 17.196 Globalization (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined. This seminar explores changes in the international economy and their effects on domestic politics, economy, and society. Is globalization really a new phenomenon? Is it irreversible? What are effects on wages and inequality, on social safety nets, on production, and innovation? How does it affect relations between developed countries and developing countries? How globalization affects democracy? These are some of the key issues that will be examined.

Subjects

international economy | international economy | domestic politics | domestic politics | economy | economy | and society | and society | globalization | globalization | wages | wages | inequality; social safety nets | inequality; social safety nets | production | production | innovation | innovation | developed countries | developed countries | developing countries | developing countries | democracy. | democracy. | democracy | democracy | inequality | inequality | social safety nets | social safety nets | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT) 21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

language | language | china | china | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | writing | writing | speaking | speaking | comprehension | comprehension | culture | culture | society | society | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Society (MIT) Society (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

chinese | chinese | language | language | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | culture | culture | china | china | society | society | custom | custom | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ásia ásia

Description

Subjects

fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | bibliotecadearte | bibliotecadearte | biblioteca | biblioteca | arte | arte | francismilletrogers | francismilletrogers | francis | francis | millet | millet | rogers | rogers | malaca | malaca | malásia | malásia | placascomemorativas | placascomemorativas | placas | placas | comemorações | comemorações | malacahistoricalsociety | malacahistoricalsociety | historicalsociety | historicalsociety

License

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ásia ásia

Description

Subjects

fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | bibliotecadearte | bibliotecadearte | biblioteca | biblioteca | arte | arte | francismilletrogers | francismilletrogers | francis | francis | millet | millet | rogers | rogers | malaca | malaca | malásia | malásia | placascomemorativas | placascomemorativas | placas | placas | comemorações | comemorações | malacahistoricalsociety | malacahistoricalsociety | historicalsociety | historicalsociety

License

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ásia ásia

Description

Subjects

fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | bibliotecadearte | bibliotecadearte | biblioteca | biblioteca | arte | arte | francismilletrogers | francismilletrogers | francis | francis | millet | millet | rogers | rogers | malaca | malaca | malásia | malásia | placascomemorativas | placascomemorativas | placas | placas | comemorações | comemorações | malacahistoricalsociety | malacahistoricalsociety | historicalsociety | historicalsociety

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17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | political theory | political theory | modern society | modern society | citizenship | citizenship | women | women | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | class | class | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | power | power | culture | culture | morality | morality | gender | gender | modern life | modern life | feminist scholarship | feminist scholarship | public | public | private | private | roles | roles | civil society | civil society | political culture | political culture | WMN.412J | WMN.412J | 17.118 | 17.118 | SP.412 | SP.412 | WMN.412 | WMN.412

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact"). The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact").

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context | mind | mind | matter | matter | scientific | scientific | natural reality | natural reality | virtual | virtual | Darwin | Darwin | life | life | discover | discover | machine | machine | natural history | natural history | reality | reality | educational technology | educational technology | design and experimentation | design and experimentation | education reform | education reform | standards and standardized testing | standards and standardized testing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Centre, Artists Society, Mansur, Baghdad Centre, Artists Society, Mansur, Baghdad

Description

Subjects

iraq | iraq | artists | artists | society | society | fundação | fundação | artista | artista | gulbenkian | gulbenkian | associação | associação | iraque | iraque | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | fundaçãocaloustegulbenkian | bagdade | bagdade | artistssociety | artistssociety | associaçãodeartistasiraquianos | associaçãodeartistasiraquianos

License

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21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT) 21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

language | language | china | china | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | writing | writing | speaking | speaking | comprehension | comprehension | culture | culture | society | society | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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