Searching for sociology : 182 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Combat Soldier: Infantry Tactics and Cohesion in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries The Combat Soldier: Infantry Tactics and Cohesion in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries

Description

Professor Anthony King (University of Exeter) looks at the modern infantry tactics and cohesion, with a perspective on conscripted vs. professional armies. Professor Anthony King (University of Exeter) looks at the modern infantry tactics and cohesion, with a perspective on conscripted vs. professional armies.

Subjects

professional armies | professional armies | sociology of war | sociology of war | conscription | conscription | army | army | professional armies | sociology of war | conscription | army | professional armies | sociology of war | conscription | army

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129156/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sociology of health and illness

Description

This module aims to show how health and illness although rooted in biological issues are not reducible to them. It will introduce key theories and empirical evidence to demonstrate a range of issues such as the social construction of medical power and the relationship between social inequalities and health. It will introduce students to some of the debates about medical uncertainty and the show the value of sociological critiques to medical practices.

Subjects

sociology | level_6 | sociology_of_health_and_illness | medical_sociology | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sociology of Human Reproduction

Description

This module examines the social and cultural relations of human reproduction. It outlines the ways in which ideals about femininity, masculinity, gender relationships and ‘normal’ families are present in debates about who should and should not have children. It introduces a range of feminist theories on human reproduction and draws on empirical studies to explain and explore theoretical issues. It shows the interrelationship between social structures and controls over human reproduction, and how studying the way that society understands human reproduction helps to understand these wider social structures.

Subjects

sociology_of_human_reproduction | human_reproduction | sociology | medical_sociology | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature. This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature.

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Combat Soldier: Infantry Tactics and Cohesion in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries

Description

Professor Anthony King (University of Exeter) looks at the modern infantry tactics and cohesion, with a perspective on conscripted vs. professional armies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

professional armies | sociology of war | conscription | army | professional armies | sociology of war | conscription | army

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129156/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | defense | policy | institutional relationships | military | forces | civil | government | industry | science | military relations | politicians | defense contractors | officers | strategies | bureaucracy | armed services | contractors | defense scientists | sociology | organization | politics | political economy | congress | president | terror | war | homeland | intraservice | interservice | cargo | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Transformations of the State: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Description

Professor Saskia Sassen delivers the keynote speech of the 'Transformations of the State: Interdisciplinary Perspectives' conference held by the Anglo-German State of the State Fellowship Programme on 21st May 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | government | economics | Governance | state | politics | law | history | sociology | government | economics | Governance | state | politics | law | history | 2011-05-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129148/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | international relations | international relations | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT)

Description

Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course. This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | belief | belief | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy | egoism | egoism | altruism | altruism | intentions | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | Humean theory of motivation | willing | willing | wanting | wanting | waiting | waiting | weakness | weakness | Akrasia | Akrasia | self-control | self-control | temptation | temptation | self-regulation | self-regulation | free will | free will | self-deception | self-deception | moral psychology | moral psychology | empirical work | empirical work | autism | autism | ethical judgment | ethical judgment | moral luck | moral luck | virtue | virtue

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | social change | urbanism | urban growth | environmental sociology | human ecology | underclass | social inequality | political power | socio-spatial change | built environment | race and politics | political economy | urban villages | globalization | social justice | community | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Building markets: Where innovation meets strategy

Description

Dr Marc Ventresca from Oxford University's business school reports on recent advances in economic sociology with examples from markets in high technology, microfinance in Bangladesh, and ecosystem services in Amazonian Peru. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

microfinance | economic sociology | business | strategy | innovation | markets | alumni weekend | microfinance | economic sociology | business | strategy | innovation | markets | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129169/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Privacy 3.0 - A Critical Juncture or Convenient Hype?

Description

Simon Davies (Director, Privacy International) presents an overview of the key privacy risks, especially as regards the Internet, which have emerged in the Web 3.0 era. This seminar is the first in the OxPILS series "Mending the Tangled Web? Informational Privacy 3.0". This series has been generously made possible with funding from a Joint Programme between the European Union and the Council of Europe. (The views expressed are those of the individual speakers only). The talk argued that the current data protection framework is struggling to cope with the mass and diffuse nature of data processing which has now become ubiquitous. One way forward may be to develop and entrench technology with build-in privacy protections such as cryto-algorithms at every level. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | socio-legal | law | sociolegal | Oxpils | sociology | socio-legal | law | sociolegal | Oxpils | 2011-11-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129061/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Evidence-based Interventions in Juvenile Justice: Concepts, Research, Practice, and Frontiers

Description

Professor Mark Lipsey (Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University) delivers the 2011 Sidney Ball Memorial Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | sidney ball | social work | social policy | child | childhood | intervention | sociology | sidney ball | social work | social policy | child | childhood | intervention | 2011-11-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129063/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Evidence-based Interventions in Juvenile Justice: Concepts, Research, Practice, and Frontiers

Description

Professor Mark Lipsey (Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University) delivers the 2011 Sidney Ball Memorial Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | sidney ball | social work | social policy | child | childhood | intervention | sociology | sidney ball | social work | social policy | child | childhood | intervention | 2011-11-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129063/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

The course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; virtues and character traits. The course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; virtues and character traits.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | beleif | beleif | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Andy Field on teaching quantitative methods to social science students

Description

Andy Field (University of Sussex) discusses his experiences and views of what works well when teaching quantitative methods to undergraduate social science students, especially with mixed ability and low motivation students. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sociology | quantitative methods | statistics | learning | teaching | Social Sciences | sociology | quantitative methods | statistics | learning | teaching | Social Sciences

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129156/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.S53 Chinese Popular Musics in Dialogue (MIT) 21M.S53 Chinese Popular Musics in Dialogue (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the major popular music cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. We will consider a wide variety of genres, from Shanghainese shidaiqu to Cantopop to Taiwanese rap, with the goal of listening beyond the notion of a monolithic "Chinese popular music" to something more dynamic, multivocal, and translocal. We will ask: What, if anything, is so "Chinese" about Chinese popular music? How does popular music participate in the formation of identities for artists and audiences in these areas? How does it enable the articulation of diverging social and political values while also facilitating meaningful connections among disparate communities? We will approach these questions through a diverse array of source materials, including sound reco This course provides an introduction to the major popular music cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. We will consider a wide variety of genres, from Shanghainese shidaiqu to Cantopop to Taiwanese rap, with the goal of listening beyond the notion of a monolithic "Chinese popular music" to something more dynamic, multivocal, and translocal. We will ask: What, if anything, is so "Chinese" about Chinese popular music? How does popular music participate in the formation of identities for artists and audiences in these areas? How does it enable the articulation of diverging social and political values while also facilitating meaningful connections among disparate communities? We will approach these questions through a diverse array of source materials, including sound reco

Subjects

Chinese popular music | Chinese popular music | Cantonese popular music | Cantonese popular music | Taiwanese popular music | Taiwanese popular music | Shidaiqu | Shidaiqu | Cantopop | Cantopop | Taiwanese rap | Taiwanese rap | Chinese rock'n'roll | Chinese rock'n'roll | music sociology | music sociology | cultural studies | cultural studies | transnational music studies | transnational music studies | ethnomusicology | ethnomusicology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata