Searching for sorting : 59 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2

18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component. This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability | probability theory counting | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | Chernoff bounds | counting | counting | coding | coding | sampling | sampling | random sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | Catalan families | generating functions | generating functions | chord diagrams | chord diagrams | linear programming | linear programming | simplex method | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | network flows | maximum flow problem | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | QUICKSORT | median finding | median finding | sorting networks | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | cryptography | RSA code | RSA code | primaility testing | primaility testing | FFT | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | linear codes | hamming code | hamming code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT) 18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic. This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete mathematics | discrete | discrete | math | math | mathematics | mathematics | seminar | seminar | presentations | presentations | student presentations | student presentations | oral | oral | communication | communication | stable marriage | stable marriage | dych | dych | emergency | emergency | response vehicles | response vehicles | ambulance | ambulance | game theory | game theory | congruences | congruences | color theorem | color theorem | four color | four color | cake cutting | cake cutting | algorithm | algorithm | RSA | RSA | encryption | encryption | numberical integration | numberical integration | sorting | sorting | post correspondence problem | post correspondence problem | PCP | PCP | ramsey | ramsey | van der waals | van der waals | fibonacci | fibonacci | recursion | recursion | domino | domino | tiling | tiling | towers | towers | hanoi | hanoi | pigeonhole | pigeonhole | principle | principle | matrix | matrix | hamming | hamming | code | code | hat game | hat game | juggling | juggling | zero-knowledge | zero-knowledge | proof | proof | repeated games | repeated games | lewis carroll | lewis carroll | determinants | determinants | infinitude of primes | infinitude of primes | bridges | bridges | konigsberg | konigsberg | koenigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | time series analysis | GARCH | GARCH | rational | rational | recurrence | recurrence | relations | relations | digital | digital | image | image | compression | compression | quantum computing | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | information theory | information theory | coding theory | coding theory | secret codes | secret codes | generating functions | generating functions | linear programming | linear programming | game theory | game theory | discrete applied mathematics | discrete applied mathematics | mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | sorting data | sorting data | efficient data storage | efficient data storage | efficient data transmission | efficient data transmission | error correction | error correction | secrecy | secrecy | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | network-flow problems | network-flow problems | mathematical economics | mathematical economics | statistics | statistics | probability theory | probability theory | combinatorics | combinatorics | linear algebra | linear algebra

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310 Principles of Discrete Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to discrete applied mathematics. Topics include probability, counting, linear programming, number-theoretic algorithms, sorting, data compression, and error-correcting codes. This is a Communication Intensive in the Major (CI-M) course, and thus includes a writing component.

Subjects

probability | probability theory counting | pigeonhole principle | Van der Waerden's theorem | Chernoff bounds | counting | coding | sampling | random sampling | Catalan families | generating functions | chord diagrams | linear programming | simplex method | Zero-Sum matrix | network flows | maximum flow problem | sorting algorithms | QUICKSORT | median finding | sorting networks | Batcher's algorithm | Euclid's algorithm | Chinese Remainder Theorem | cryptography | RSA code | primaility testing | FFT | Fast Fourier Transform | Shannon's coding theorems | Lempel-Ziv codes | linear codes | hamming code

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | information theory | information theory | coding theory | coding theory | secret codes | secret codes | generating functions | generating functions | linear programming | linear programming | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310C Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310C Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. This course was recently revised to meet the MIT Undergraduate Communication Requirement (CR). It covers the same content as 18.310, but assignments are structured with an additional focus on writing. Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. This course was recently revised to meet the MIT Undergraduate Communication Requirement (CR). It covers the same content as 18.310, but assignments are structured with an additional focus on writing.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | information theory | information theory | coding theory | coding theory | secret codes | secret codes | generating functions | generating functions | linear programming | linear programming | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.304 Undergraduate Seminar in Discrete Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course is a student-presented seminar in combinatorics, graph theory, and discrete mathematics in general. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is emphasized, with participants reading and presenting papers from recent mathematics literature and writing a final paper in a related topic.

Subjects

discrete math; discrete mathematics; discrete; math; mathematics; seminar; presentations; student presentations; oral; communication; stable marriage; dych; emergency; response vehicles; ambulance; game theory; congruences; color theorem; four color; cake cutting; algorithm; RSA; encryption; numberical integration; sorting; post correspondence problem; PCP; ramsey; van der waals; fibonacci; recursion; domino; tiling; towers; hanoi; pigeonhole; principle; matrix; hamming; code; hat game; juggling; zero-knowledge; proof; repeated games; lewis carroll; determinants; infinitude of primes; bridges; konigsberg; koenigsberg; time series analysis; GARCH; rational; recurrence; relations; digital; image; compression; quantum computing | discrete math | discrete mathematics | discrete | math | mathematics | seminar | presentations | student presentations | oral | communication | stable marriage | dych | emergency | response vehicles | ambulance | game theory | congruences | color theorem | four color | cake cutting | algorithm | RSA | encryption | numberical integration | sorting | post correspondence problem | PCP | ramsey | van der waals | fibonacci | recursion | domino | tiling | towers | hanoi | pigeonhole | principle | matrix | hamming | code | hat game | juggling | zero-knowledge | proof | repeated games | lewis carroll | determinants | infinitude of primes | bridges | konigsberg | koenigsberg | time series analysis | GARCH | rational | recurrence | relations | digital | image | compression | quantum computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | information theory | coding theory | secret codes | generating functions | linear programming | game theory | discrete applied mathematics | mathematical analysis | sorting data | efficient data storage | efficient data transmission | error correction | secrecy | Fast Fourier Transform | network-flow problems | mathematical economics | statistics | probability theory | combinatorics | linear algebra

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT) 6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms). Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms).

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | efficient algorithms | efficient algorithms | sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide-and-conquer | divide-and-conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths | network flow | network flow | computational geometry | computational geometry | number-theoretic algorithms | number-theoretic algorithms | polynomial and matrix calculations | polynomial and matrix calculations | caching | caching | parallel computing | parallel computing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms (MIT) 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms (MIT)

Description

Techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics include sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; greedy algorithms; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; and shortest paths. Advanced topics may include network flow, computational geometry, number-theoretic algorithms, polynomial and matrix calculations, caching, and parallel computing. Techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics include sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; greedy algorithms; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; and shortest paths. Advanced topics may include network flow, computational geometry, number-theoretic algorithms, polynomial and matrix calculations, caching, and parallel computing.

Subjects

sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide and conquer | divide and conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | greedy algorithms | greedy algorithms | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.310C Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.310C Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. This course was recently revised to meet the MIT Undergraduate Communication Requirement (CR). It covers the same content as 18.310, but assignments are structured with an additional focus on writing. Principles of Applied Mathematics is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world. This course was recently revised to meet the MIT Undergraduate Communication Requirement (CR). It covers the same content as 18.310, but assignments are structured with an additional focus on writing.

Subjects

sorting algorithms | sorting algorithms | information theory | information theory | coding theory | coding theory | secret codes | secret codes | generating functions | generating functions | linear programming | linear programming | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.006 Introduction to Algorithms (MIT) 6.006 Introduction to Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems. This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems.

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | python | python | python cost model | python cost model | binary search trees | binary search trees | hashing | hashing | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | shortest paths | shortest paths | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | numerics | numerics | document distance | document distance | longest common substring | longest common substring | dijkstra | dijkstra | fibonacci | fibonacci | image resizing | image resizing | chaining | chaining | hash functions | hash functions | priority queues | priority queues | breadth first search | breadth first search | depth first search | depth first search | memoization | memoization | divide and conquer | divide and conquer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT) 6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503) (MIT)

Description

This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms). This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5503 (Analysis and Design of Algorithms).

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | efficient algorithms | efficient algorithms | sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide-and-conquer | divide-and-conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths | network flow | network flow | computational geometry | computational geometry | number-theoretic algorithms | number-theoretic algorithms | polynomial and matrix calculations | polynomial and matrix calculations | caching | caching | parallel computing | parallel computing | SMA 5503 | SMA 5503 | 6.046 | 6.046

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course teaches fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is focused on object-oriented software design and development. Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java programming language is used. This course teaches fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is focused on object-oriented software design and development. Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage in active learning using laptop computers (available on loan). Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java® programming language is used. This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage in active learning using laptop computers (available on loan). Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java® programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development is the focus of the course. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. Emphasis is on developing techniques for solving problems in engineering, science, management, and planning. The Java® programming language is used. The course is worth 3 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .java files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recomm This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development is the focus of the course. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. Emphasis is on developing techniques for solving problems in engineering, science, management, and planning. The Java® programming language is used. The course is worth 3 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .java files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recomm

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT) HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT)

Description

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Subjects

HST.410 | HST.410 | 6.07 | 6.07 | cell manipulation | cell manipulation | microchips | microchips | lithography | lithography | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | optical imaging of cells | optical imaging of cells | cell sorting | cell sorting | microfluidics | microfluidics | osmosis | osmosis | diffusion | diffusion | microfabrication | microfabrication | models of diffusion | models of diffusion | laminar flow | laminar flow | MATLAB data analysis | MATLAB data analysis | cell traps | cell traps | experimental design | experimental design | cytometry techniques | cytometry techniques | computer simulation of neural behavior | computer simulation of neural behavior | casting PDMS | casting PDMS | coulter counter | coulter counter | plasma bonding | plasma bonding

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-HST.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (MIT) 6.046J Introduction to Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing. This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | efficient algorithms | efficient algorithms | sorting | sorting | search trees | search trees | heaps | heaps | hashing | hashing | divide-and-conquer | divide-and-conquer | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | amortized analysis | amortized analysis | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | shortest paths | shortest paths | network flow | network flow | computational geometry | computational geometry | number-theoretic algorithms | number-theoretic algorithms | polynomial and matrix calculations | polynomial and matrix calculations | caching | caching | parallel computing | parallel computing | 6.046 | 6.046 | 18.410 | 18.410

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.896 Theory of Parallel Hardware (SMA 5511) (MIT) 6.896 Theory of Parallel Hardware (SMA 5511) (MIT)

Description

6.896 covers mathematical foundations of parallel hardware, from computer arithmetic to physical design, focusing on algorithmic underpinnings. Topics covered include: arithmetic circuits, parallel prefix, systolic arrays, retiming, clocking methodologies, boolean logic, sorting networks, interconnection networks, hypercubic networks, P-completeness, VLSI layout theory, reconfigurable wiring, fat-trees, and area-time complexity. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5511 (Theory of Parallel Hardware). 6.896 covers mathematical foundations of parallel hardware, from computer arithmetic to physical design, focusing on algorithmic underpinnings. Topics covered include: arithmetic circuits, parallel prefix, systolic arrays, retiming, clocking methodologies, boolean logic, sorting networks, interconnection networks, hypercubic networks, P-completeness, VLSI layout theory, reconfigurable wiring, fat-trees, and area-time complexity. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5511 (Theory of Parallel Hardware).

Subjects

parallel hardware | parallel hardware | computer arithmetic | computer arithmetic | physical design | physical design | algorithms | algorithms | arithmetic circuits | arithmetic circuits | parallel prefix | parallel prefix | systolic arrays | systolic arrays | retiming | retiming | clocking methodologies | clocking methodologies | boolean logic | boolean logic | sorting networks | sorting networks | interconnection networks | interconnection networks | hypercubic networks | hypercubic networks | P-completeness | P-completeness | VLSI layout theory | VLSI layout theory | reconfigurable wiring | reconfigurable wiring | fat-trees | fat-trees | area-time complexity | area-time complexity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT) 1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J. This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J.

Subjects

modern software development | modern software development | engineering and information technology | engineering and information technology | component-based software | component-based software | C# | C# | .NET | .NET | data structures | data structures | algorithms for modeling | algorithms for modeling | analysis | analysis | visualization | visualization | basic problem-solving techniques | basic problem-solving techniques | web services | web services | management and maintenance of software | management and maintenance of software | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | algorithms | algorithms | numerical simulation techniques | numerical simulation techniques | image processing | image processing | computational geometry | computational geometry | finite element methods | finite element methods | network methods | network methods | e-business applications | e-business applications | classes | classes | objects | objects | inheritance | inheritance | virtual functions | virtual functions | abstract classes | abstract classes | polymorphism | polymorphism | Java applications | Java applications | applets | applets | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Graphics | Graphics | Threads | Threads | Java | Java | C++ | C++ | information technology | information technology | engineering | engineering | modeling algorithms | modeling algorithms | basic problem-solving | basic problem-solving | software management | software management | software maintenance | software maintenance | searching algorithms | searching algorithms | numerical simulation | numerical simulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | 13.470J | 13.470J | 1.124 | 1.124 | 2.159 | 2.159 | 13.470 | 13.470

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.006 Introduction to Algorithms (MIT) 6.006 Introduction to Algorithms (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems.

Subjects

algorithms | algorithms | data structures | data structures | algorithm performance | algorithm performance | algorithm analysis | algorithm analysis | sorting | sorting | trees | trees | hashing | hashing | numerics | numerics | graphs | graphs | shortest paths | shortest paths | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | Python | Python

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.856J Randomized Algorithms (MIT) 6.856J Randomized Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course examines how randomization can be used to make algorithms simpler and more efficient via random sampling, random selection of witnesses, symmetry breaking, and Markov chains. Topics covered include: randomized computation; data structures (hash tables, skip lists); graph algorithms (minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, minimum cuts); geometric algorithms (convex hulls, linear programming in fixed or arbitrary dimension); approximate counting; parallel algorithms; online algorithms; derandomization techniques; and tools for probabilistic analysis of algorithms. This course examines how randomization can be used to make algorithms simpler and more efficient via random sampling, random selection of witnesses, symmetry breaking, and Markov chains. Topics covered include: randomized computation; data structures (hash tables, skip lists); graph algorithms (minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, minimum cuts); geometric algorithms (convex hulls, linear programming in fixed or arbitrary dimension); approximate counting; parallel algorithms; online algorithms; derandomization techniques; and tools for probabilistic analysis of algorithms.

Subjects

Randomized Algorithms | Randomized Algorithms | algorithms | algorithms | efficient in time and space | efficient in time and space | randomization | randomization | computational problems | computational problems | data structures | data structures | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | optimization | optimization | geometry | geometry | Markov chains | Markov chains | sampling | sampling | estimation | estimation | geometric algorithms | geometric algorithms | parallel and distributed algorithms | parallel and distributed algorithms | parallel and ditributed algorithm | parallel and ditributed algorithm | parallel and distributed algorithm | parallel and distributed algorithm | random sampling | random sampling | random selection of witnesses | random selection of witnesses | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | randomized computational models | randomized computational models | hash tables | hash tables | skip lists | skip lists | minimum spanning trees | minimum spanning trees | shortest paths | shortest paths | minimum cuts | minimum cuts | convex hulls | convex hulls | linear programming | linear programming | fixed dimension | fixed dimension | arbitrary dimension | arbitrary dimension | approximate counting | approximate counting | parallel algorithms | parallel algorithms | online algorithms | online algorithms | derandomization techniques | derandomization techniques | probabilistic analysis | probabilistic analysis | computational number theory | computational number theory | simplicity | simplicity | speed | speed | design | design | basic probability theory | basic probability theory | application | application | randomized complexity classes | randomized complexity classes | game-theoretic techniques | game-theoretic techniques | Chebyshev | Chebyshev | moment inequalities | moment inequalities | limited independence | limited independence | coupon collection | coupon collection | occupancy problems | occupancy problems | tail inequalities | tail inequalities | Chernoff bound | Chernoff bound | conditional expectation | conditional expectation | probabilistic method | probabilistic method | random walks | random walks | algebraic techniques | algebraic techniques | probability amplification | probability amplification | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | combinatorial optimization | combinatorial optimization | approximation | approximation | counting problems | counting problems | distributed algorithms | distributed algorithms | 6.856 | 6.856 | 18.416 | 18.416

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata