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21L.007J After Columbus (MIT) 21L.007J After Columbus (MIT)

Description

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres

Subjects

21L.007 | 21L.007 | 21G.020 | 21G.020 | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north | america | north | america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report | north america | north america | New World | New World | America | America | Native Americans | Native Americans | English | English | Europeans | Europeans | North America | North America | literary transformations | literary transformations | nation | nation | captivity narratives | captivity narratives | Michel Montaigne | Michel Montaigne | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Jean de L?ry | Jean de L?ry | Daniel Defoe | Daniel Defoe | Mary Rowlandson | Mary Rowlandson | Derek Walcott | Derek Walcott | J. M. Coetzee | J. M. Coetzee | Christopher Columbus | Christopher Columbus | 21F.020J | 21F.020J | 21F.020 | 21F.020

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Description

A practical Masterclass with Greg Doran from the Royal Shakespeare Company on how Shakespeare spins rhetoric for the actor, with Sam Leith, journalist and writer, and author of 'You Talkin' to Me'. Students from Oxford University Drama Society take part. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas | literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas

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Description

A practical Masterclass looking at what clues Shakespeare puts into the verse for the actor. Students from Oxford University Drama Society will take part in the masterclass with an audience. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas | literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas

License

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Description

A practical Masterclass with Greg Doran from the Royal Shakespeare Company on how Shakespeare spins rhetoric for the actor, with Sam Leith, journalist and writer, and author of 'You Talkin' to Me'. Students from Oxford University Drama Society take part. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas | literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

A practical Masterclass looking at what clues Shakespeare puts into the verse for the actor. Students from Oxford University Drama Society will take part in the masterclass with an audience. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas | literature | humanities | drama | Royal Shakespeare Company | shakespeare | #greatwriters | humanitas

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Timon of Athens

Description

Emma Smith finishes her Approaching Shakespeare series with a lecture on the play Timon of Athens. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

shakespeare | approaching shakespeare | literature | elizabethan | drama | tragedy | shakespeare | approaching shakespeare | literature | elizabethan | drama | tragedy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Stephen Fitzgibbon, arrested for a series of thefts Stephen Fitzgibbon, arrested for a series of thefts

Description

Subjects

boy | boy | portrait | portrait | blur | blur | hat | hat | youth | youth | interesting | interesting | child | child | unitedkingdom | unitedkingdom | mark | mark | coat | coat | grain | grain | young | young | historic | historic | criminal | criminal | crime | crime | cap | cap | button | button | mugshot | mugshot | fold | fold | unusual | unusual | carf | carf | cloth | cloth | theft | theft | policestation | policestation | crease | crease | punishment | punishment | attentive | attentive | edwardian | edwardian | arrested | arrested | stealing | stealing | prisoner | prisoner | fascinating | fascinating | digitalimage | digitalimage | firearms | firearms | charged | charged | larceny | larceny | northshields | northshields | imprisoned | imprisoned | prisontime | prisontime | northtyneside | northtyneside | socialhistory | socialhistory | fishquay | fishquay | blackframe | blackframe | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | northeastofengland | northeastofengland | thefts | thefts | birdstreet | birdstreet | neutralbackground | neutralbackground | northshieldsfishquay | northshieldsfishquay | courthearing | courthearing | thomaspearson | thomaspearson | charlespearson | charlespearson | 190216 | 190216 | northshieldspolicecourt | northshieldspolicecourt | northshieldspolicestation | northshieldspolicestation | chiefconstablehuish | chiefconstablehuish | criminalfacesofnorthshieldschildren | criminalfacesofnorthshieldschildren | lieutcolonelfrnhaswell | lieutcolonelfrnhaswell | 15birdstreet | 15birdstreet | 15november1907 | 15november1907 | mrghstansfield | mrghstansfield | coungaddison | coungaddison | stephenfitzgibbon | stephenfitzgibbon

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Charles Pearson, arrested for stealing from offices Charles Pearson, arrested for stealing from offices

Description

Subjects

boy | boy | portrait | portrait | blur | blur | male | male | eye | eye | face | face | hat | hat | youth | youth | mouth | mouth | hair | hair | nose | nose | interesting | interesting | child | child | serious | serious | head | head | coat | coat | grain | grain | young | young | surreal | surreal | custody | custody | historic | historic | criminal | criminal | crime | crime | cap | cap | ear | ear | mugshot | mugshot | lip | lip | unusual | unusual | cloth | cloth | shoulder | shoulder | theft | theft | backyards | backyards | policestation | policestation | crease | crease | punishment | punishment | attentive | attentive | edwardian | edwardian | stealing | stealing | prisoner | prisoner | fascinating | fascinating | digitalimage | digitalimage | firearms | firearms | larceny | larceny | northshields | northshields | imprisoned | imprisoned | hardlabour | hardlabour | northtyneside | northtyneside | socialhistory | socialhistory | fishquay | fishquay | blackframe | blackframe | accomplice | accomplice | blackandwhitephotograph | blackandwhitephotograph | thefts | thefts | publicrecords | publicrecords | birdstreet | birdstreet | neutralbackground | neutralbackground | northshieldsfishquay | northshieldsfishquay | prisonsentence | prisonsentence | newspaperreport | newspaperreport | thomaspearson | thomaspearson | charlespearson | charlespearson | northshieldspolicecourt | northshieldspolicecourt | 19021916 | 19021916 | northshieldspolicestation | northshieldspolicestation | theshieldsdailynews | theshieldsdailynews | chiefconstablehuish | chiefconstablehuish | criminalfacesofnorthshieldschildren | criminalfacesofnorthshieldschildren | lieutcolonelfrnhaswell | lieutcolonelfrnhaswell | courtcasehearing | courtcasehearing | 16november1907 | 16november1907 | 15november1907 | 15november1907 | mrghstansfield | mrghstansfield | coungaddison | coungaddison | stephenfitzgibbon | stephenfitzgibbon | sixchamberedrevolver | sixchamberedrevolver

License

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | english history | english history | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation. This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation.

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Satire | Satire | Greek | Greek | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Writing | Writing | Literature | Literature | Communications | Communications | Cervantes | Cervantes | comedies | comedies | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

A chronological survey of lyric poetry in the English language by major writers, running from Beowulf to the end of the twentieth century. For instance: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, others more recent. There will be some attention to longer poems but mostly we will be reading (and hearing) short works. The last two weeks of the semester will be devoted to works selected and presented by members of the class. Frequent reading aloud, two group presentations, four or five papers (two revised) totaling at least twenty pages of final draft. A chronological survey of lyric poetry in the English language by major writers, running from Beowulf to the end of the twentieth century. For instance: Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Auden, others more recent. There will be some attention to longer poems but mostly we will be reading (and hearing) short works. The last two weeks of the semester will be devoted to works selected and presented by members of the class. Frequent reading aloud, two group presentations, four or five papers (two revised) totaling at least twenty pages of final draft.

Subjects

lyric poetry | lyric poetry | Beowulf | Beowulf | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Donne | Donne | Wroth | Wroth | Herbert | Herbert | Milton | Milton | Marvell | Marvell | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Yeats | Yeats | Frost | Frost | Stevens | Stevens | Eliot | Eliot | Auden | Auden

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Shakespeare and Medieval Romance

Description

Professor Helen Cooper, University of Cambridge, speaks about the continuities between the Romance of the middle ages and Shakespeare's plays. She looks at textual features from his plays (including King Lear) which may indicate his influences. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | medieval | romance | sources | shakespeare | influences | #greatwriters | medieval | romance | sources | shakespeare | influences | 2012-03-23

License

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The Bodleian Shakespeare: A treasure lost... and regained

Description

From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Emma Smith reveals how Oxford University mobilised Alumni support to bring Shakespeare's First Folio back to the Bodleian library over 200 years after it was lost. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

folger | literature | bodleian | library | Libraries | shakespeare | first folio | english | history | folger | literature | bodleian | library | Libraries | shakespeare | first folio | english | history | 2010-09-24

License

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The Bodleian Shakespeare: A treasure lost... and regained

Description

From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Emma Smith reveals how Oxford University mobilised Alumni support to bring Shakespeare's First Folio back to the Bodleian library over 200 years after it was lost. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

folger | literature | bodleian | library | Libraries | shakespeare | first folio | english | history | folger | literature | bodleian | library | Libraries | shakespeare | first folio | english | history | 2010-09-24

License

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'Stratford-on-Avon, Ann Hathaway's Cottage at Shottery'

Description

Subjects

blackandwhite | architecture | garden | 19thcentury | cottage | victorian | shakespeare | thatchedroof | stratford | stratforduponavon | stratfordonavon | williamshakespeare | annhathaway | 1880s | shottery | francisbedford | francisbedfordco

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21L.009 Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.009 Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Three hundred and eighty years after his death, William Shakespeare remains the central author of the English-speaking world; he is the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright — and now among the most popular screenwriters as well. Why is that, and who "is" he? Why do so many people think his writing is so great? What meanings did his plays have in his own time, and how do we read, speak, or listen to his words now? What should we watch for when viewing his plays in performance? Whose plays are we watching, anyway? We'll consider these questions as we carefully examine a sampling of Shakespeare's plays from a variety of critical perspectives. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Three hundred and eighty years after his death, William Shakespeare remains the central author of the English-speaking world; he is the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright — and now among the most popular screenwriters as well. Why is that, and who "is" he? Why do so many people think his writing is so great? What meanings did his plays have in his own time, and how do we read, speak, or listen to his words now? What should we watch for when viewing his plays in performance? Whose plays are we watching, anyway? We'll consider these questions as we carefully examine a sampling of Shakespeare's plays from a variety of critical perspectives.

Subjects

literature | literature | william shakespeare | william shakespeare | playwright | playwright | performance | performance | theater | theater | literary analysis | literary analysis | film | film | A Midsummer Night's Dream | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Much Ado about Nothing | Much Ado about Nothing | Hamlet | Hamlet | The First Part of King Henry the Fourth | The First Part of King Henry the Fourth | Henry the Fifth | Henry the Fifth | Othello | Othello | King Lear | King Lear | The Tempest | The Tempest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.010 Writing with Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.010 Writing with Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

William Shakespeare didn't go to college. If he time-traveled like Dr. Who, he would be stunned to find his words on a university syllabus. However, he would not be surprised at the way we will be using those words in this class, because the study of rhetoric was essential to all education in his day. At Oxford, William Gager argued that drama allowed undergraduates "to try their voices and confirm their memories, and to frame their speech and conform it to convenient action": in other words, drama was useful. Shakespeare's fellow playwright Thomas Heywood similarly recalled: In the time of my residence in Cambridge, I have seen Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Pastorals and Shows, publicly acted…: this is held necessary for the emboldening of their Junior scholars, to ar William Shakespeare didn't go to college. If he time-traveled like Dr. Who, he would be stunned to find his words on a university syllabus. However, he would not be surprised at the way we will be using those words in this class, because the study of rhetoric was essential to all education in his day. At Oxford, William Gager argued that drama allowed undergraduates "to try their voices and confirm their memories, and to frame their speech and conform it to convenient action": in other words, drama was useful. Shakespeare's fellow playwright Thomas Heywood similarly recalled: In the time of my residence in Cambridge, I have seen Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Pastorals and Shows, publicly acted…: this is held necessary for the emboldening of their Junior scholars, to ar

Subjects

21W.734 | 21W.734 | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Study of Rhetoric | Study of Rhetoric | Thomas Heywood | Thomas Heywood | Tragedies | Tragedies | Comedies | Comedies | Histories | Histories | Pastorals | Pastorals | Dialectic | Dialectic | Rhetoric | Rhetoric | Ethic | Ethic | Metaphysical Lectures | Metaphysical Lectures | Argumentation | Argumentation | Theater | Theater

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | church | church | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | philosphy | philosphy | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | Scotland | Scotland | english history | english history | scottish history | scottish history | Britain | Britain | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell | Jacobean era | Jacobean era | Caroline era | Caroline era | English Restoration | English Restoration | House of Stuart | House of Stuart | English Civil War | English Civil War | Early Modern English | Early Modern English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT) 21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT)

Description

This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist

Subjects

world | world | travel | travel | writing | writing | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north america | north america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays. This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | humor | drama | drama | narrative | narrative | genre | genre | literary history | literary history | irony | irony | comic | comic | slapstick | slapstick | satire | satire | wit | wit | trickster | trickster | allegory | allegory | transgression | transgression | social commentary | social commentary | political commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Aristophanes | Moliere | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples. This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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