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18.409 Behavior of Algorithms (MIT) 18.409 Behavior of Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course is a study of Behavior of Algorithms and covers an area of current interest in theoretical computer science. The topics vary from term to term. During this term, we discuss rigorous approaches to explaining the typical performance of algorithms with a focus on the following approaches: smoothed analysis, condition numbers/parametric analysis, and subclassing inputs. This course is a study of Behavior of Algorithms and covers an area of current interest in theoretical computer science. The topics vary from term to term. During this term, we discuss rigorous approaches to explaining the typical performance of algorithms with a focus on the following approaches: smoothed analysis, condition numbers/parametric analysis, and subclassing inputs.

Subjects

Condition number | Condition number | largest singluar value of a matrix | largest singluar value of a matrix | Smoothed analysis | Smoothed analysis | Gaussian elimination | Gaussian elimination | Growth factors of partial and complete pivoting | Growth factors of partial and complete pivoting | GE of graphs with low bandwidth or small separators | GE of graphs with low bandwidth or small separators | Spectral Partitioning of planar graphs | Spectral Partitioning of planar graphs | spectral paritioning of well-shaped meshes | spectral paritioning of well-shaped meshes | spectral paritioning of nearest neighbor graphs | spectral paritioning of nearest neighbor graphs | Turner's theorem | Turner's theorem | bandwidth of semi-random graphs. | bandwidth of semi-random graphs. | McSherry's spectral bisection algorithm | McSherry's spectral bisection algorithm | Linear Programming | Linear Programming | von Neumann's algorithm | von Neumann's algorithm | primal and dual simplex methods | and duality Strong duality theorem | primal and dual simplex methods | and duality Strong duality theorem | Renegar's condition numbers | Renegar's condition numbers

License

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2.017J Design of Systems Operating in Random Environments (MIT) 2.017J Design of Systems Operating in Random Environments (MIT)

Description

This class covers the principles for optimal performance and survival of extreme events in a random environment; linear time invariant systems and Fourier transform; random processes, autocorrelation function, and power spectra. We will study statistics of the response of systems and perform optimization using a statistics-based index. The class will also involve sea wave modeling, sea spectra, elements of seakeeping, wind modeling, and wind spectra. Finally, it also covers extreme events and probability of failure; examples include extreme waves and 100-year events. Students undertake a term project, focusing on electronics and instrumentation, and design for the ocean environment. This class covers the principles for optimal performance and survival of extreme events in a random environment; linear time invariant systems and Fourier transform; random processes, autocorrelation function, and power spectra. We will study statistics of the response of systems and perform optimization using a statistics-based index. The class will also involve sea wave modeling, sea spectra, elements of seakeeping, wind modeling, and wind spectra. Finally, it also covers extreme events and probability of failure; examples include extreme waves and 100-year events. Students undertake a term project, focusing on electronics and instrumentation, and design for the ocean environment.

Subjects

optimal performance | optimal performance | extreme events | extreme events | random environment | random environment | linear time invariant systems | linear time invariant systems | random processes | random processes | autocorrelation function | autocorrelation function | power spectra | power spectra | sea wave modeling | sea wave modeling | sea spectra | sea spectra | seakeeping | seakeeping | wind modeling | wind modeling | wind spectra | wind spectra | probability of failure | probability of failure | extreme waves | extreme waves | 100-year events | 100-year events

License

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | Optimization: network flows | linear programming

License

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6.542J Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech (MIT) 6.542J Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics include: measurement of articulatory movements, measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production, computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech, synthesis of speech, perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds, speech prosody, models for speech recognition, speech disorders, and other topics. Two 1-hour lectures per week Two labs per week Brief lab reports Term project, with short term paper No exams The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics include: measurement of articulatory movements, measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production, computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech, synthesis of speech, perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds, speech prosody, models for speech recognition, speech disorders, and other topics. Two 1-hour lectures per week Two labs per week Brief lab reports Term project, with short term paper No exams

Subjects

Speech | Speech | speech disorders | speech disorders | speech recognition | speech recognition | speech prosody | speech prosody | waveform analysis | waveform analysis | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | 6.542 | 6.542 | 24.966 | 24.966 | HST.712 | HST.712 | Experimental investigations of speech processes | Experimental investigations of speech processes | Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | models for speech recognition | models for speech recognition | and other topics | and other topics | other topics | other topics

License

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2.017J Design of Systems Operating in Random Environments (MIT)

Description

This class covers the principles for optimal performance and survival of extreme events in a random environment; linear time invariant systems and Fourier transform; random processes, autocorrelation function, and power spectra. We will study statistics of the response of systems and perform optimization using a statistics-based index. The class will also involve sea wave modeling, sea spectra, elements of seakeeping, wind modeling, and wind spectra. Finally, it also covers extreme events and probability of failure; examples include extreme waves and 100-year events. Students undertake a term project, focusing on electronics and instrumentation, and design for the ocean environment.

Subjects

optimal performance | extreme events | random environment | linear time invariant systems | random processes | autocorrelation function | power spectra | sea wave modeling | sea spectra | seakeeping | wind modeling | wind spectra | probability of failure | extreme waves | 100-year events

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.409 Behavior of Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course is a study of Behavior of Algorithms and covers an area of current interest in theoretical computer science. The topics vary from term to term. During this term, we discuss rigorous approaches to explaining the typical performance of algorithms with a focus on the following approaches: smoothed analysis, condition numbers/parametric analysis, and subclassing inputs.

Subjects

Condition number | largest singluar value of a matrix | Smoothed analysis | Gaussian elimination | Growth factors of partial and complete pivoting | GE of graphs with low bandwidth or small separators | Spectral Partitioning of planar graphs | spectral paritioning of well-shaped meshes | spectral paritioning of nearest neighbor graphs | Turner's theorem | bandwidth of semi-random graphs. | McSherry's spectral bisection algorithm | Linear Programming | von Neumann's algorithm | primal and dual simplex methods | and duality Strong duality theorem | Renegar's condition numbers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.493 Natural Light in Design (MIT) 4.493 Natural Light in Design (MIT)

Description

Today, computer-based simulations are becoming increasingly popular, especially when daylighting and energy conservation are amongst the key goals for a project. This two-week workshop will expose participants to the current daylighting simulation models and beyond, by introducing realistic and dynamic assessment methods through hands-on exercises and application to a design project. Open to students and practitioners. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Today, computer-based simulations are becoming increasingly popular, especially when daylighting and energy conservation are amongst the key goals for a project. This two-week workshop will expose participants to the current daylighting simulation models and beyond, by introducing realistic and dynamic assessment methods through hands-on exercises and application to a design project. Open to students and practitioners. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

daylighting | daylighting | natural light | natural light | light calculations | light calculations | software | software | electric light | electric light | spectra | spectra | spectrum | spectrum | luminance | luminance | chrominence | chrominence | comfort | comfort | design | design | sun | sun | solar gain | solar gain | diffusion | diffusion | glazing | glazing | fenestration | fenestration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.024 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.024 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course describes how electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications. It offers experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials through hands-on experimentation and practical materials examples. This course describes how electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate from their electronic and molecular structure and how these properties can be designed for particular applications. It offers experimental exploration of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials through hands-on experimentation and practical materials examples.

Subjects

electronic properites | electronic properites | optical properties | optical properties | magnetic properties | magnetic properties | materials | materials | Hamilton approach | Hamilton approach | Schrödinger’s Equation | Schrödinger’s Equation | mechanics | mechanics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | spectral decomposition | spectral decomposition | symmetries | symmetries | angular momentum | angular momentum | periodic potentials | periodic potentials | band diagrams | band diagrams | Fermi | Fermi | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | p-n junction | p-n junction | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | wave optics | wave optics | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | magnetization | magnetization | semiconductor devices | semiconductor devices | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | photonic bands | photonic bands

License

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24.963 Linguistic Phonetics (MIT) 24.963 Linguistic Phonetics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course is a study of speech sounds: how we produce and perceive them and their acoustic properties. It explores the influence of the production and perception systems on phonological patterns and sound change. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques are also discussed. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course is a study of speech sounds: how we produce and perceive them and their acoustic properties. It explores the influence of the production and perception systems on phonological patterns and sound change. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques are also discussed.

Subjects

phonetics | phonetics | acoustics | acoustics | audition | audition | A/D conversion | A/D conversion | grammars | grammars | source-filter theory | source-filter theory | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | adaptive dispersion | adaptive dispersion | quantal theory | quantal theory | fricatives | fricatives | stops | stops | statistics | statistics | speech perception | speech perception | sounds | sounds | nasals | nasals | laterals | laterals | coarticulation | coarticulation | speech production | speech production | timing | timing | coordination | coordination | variability | variability

License

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22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT) 22.058 Principles of Medical Imaging (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation. An introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging and its applications. It includes a series of lectures with a parallel set of recitations that provide demonstrations of basic principles. Both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are covered, including x-ray, PET, MRI, and ultrasound. Emphasis on the physics and engineering of image formation.

Subjects

general imaging principles | | general imaging principles | | linear optics | | linear optics | | ray tracing | | ray tracing | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Linear Imaging Systems | | Space Invariance | | Space Invariance | | Pin-hole camera | | Pin-hole camera | | Fourier Transformations | | Fourier Transformations | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Modulation Transfer Functions | | Fourier convolution | | Fourier convolution | | Sampling | | Sampling | | Nyquist | | Nyquist | | counting statistics | | counting statistics | | additive noise | | additive noise | | optical imaging | | optical imaging | | Radiation types | | Radiation types | | Radiation detection | | Radiation detection | | photon detection | | photon detection | | spectra | | spectra | | attenuation | | attenuation | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Planar X-ray imaging | | Projective Imaging | | Projective Imaging | | X-ray CT | | X-ray CT | | Ultrasound | | Ultrasound | | microscopy | k-space | | microscopy | k-space | | NMR pulses | | NMR pulses | | f2-D gradient | | f2-D gradient | | spin echoes | | spin echoes | | 3-D methods of MRI | | 3-D methods of MRI | | volume localized spectroscopy | volume localized spectroscopy

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs. Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | Junior Lab | experimental | experimental | atomic | atomic | nuclear | nuclear | physics | physics | optics | optics | photoelectric effect | photoelectric effect | poisson | poisson | statistics | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | emission spectra | neutron physics | neutron physics | Johnson noise | Johnson noise | shot noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | Zeeman effect | rubidium | rubidium | M?ssbauer | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | superconductivity | Doppler-free | Doppler-free | laser | laser

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.542J Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics include: measurement of articulatory movements, measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production, computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech, synthesis of speech, perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds, speech prosody, models for speech recognition, speech disorders, and other topics. Two 1-hour lectures per week Two labs per week Brief lab reports Term project, with short term paper No exams

Subjects

Speech | speech disorders | speech recognition | speech prosody | waveform analysis | spectral analysis | 6.542 | 24.966 | HST.712 | Experimental investigations of speech processes | Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | models for speech recognition | and other topics | other topics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

advection equation | advection equation | heat equation | heat equation | wave equation | wave equation | Airy equation | Airy equation | convection-diffusion problems | convection-diffusion problems | KdV equation | KdV equation | hyperbolic conservation laws | hyperbolic conservation laws | Poisson equation | Poisson equation | Stokes problem | Stokes problem | Navier-Stokes equations | Navier-Stokes equations | interface problems | interface problems | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | convergence | convergence | Lax equivalence theorem | Lax equivalence theorem | error analysis | error analysis | Fourier approaches | Fourier approaches | staggered grids | staggered grids | shocks | shocks | front propagation | front propagation | preconditioning | preconditioning | multigrid | multigrid | Krylov spaces | Krylov spaces | saddle point problems | saddle point problems | finite differences | finite differences | finite volumes | finite volumes | finite elements | finite elements | ENO/WENO | ENO/WENO | spectral methods | spectral methods | projection approaches for incompressible ows | projection approaches for incompressible ows | level set methods | level set methods | particle methods | particle methods | direct and iterative methods | direct and iterative methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.493 Natural Light in Design (MIT) 4.493 Natural Light in Design (MIT)

Description

Today, computer-based simulations are becoming increasingly popular, especially when daylighting and energy conservation are amongst the key goals for a project. This two-week workshop will expose participants to the current daylighting simulation models and beyond, by introducing realistic and dynamic assessment methods through hands-on exercises and application to a design project. Open to students and practitioners. Today, computer-based simulations are becoming increasingly popular, especially when daylighting and energy conservation are amongst the key goals for a project. This two-week workshop will expose participants to the current daylighting simulation models and beyond, by introducing realistic and dynamic assessment methods through hands-on exercises and application to a design project. Open to students and practitioners.

Subjects

daylighting | daylighting | natural light | natural light | light calculations | light calculations | software | software | electric light | electric light | spectra | spectra | spectrum | spectrum | luminance | luminance | chrominence | chrominence | comfort | comfort | design | design | sun | sun | solar gain | solar gain | diffusion | diffusion | glazing | glazing | fenestration | fenestration

License

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4.492 Daylighting (MIT) 4.492 Daylighting (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on the use and optimization of daylight in buildings and on its complementarity to artificial (electric) lighting, to aim at reducing the building's environmental impact while improving the visual comfort of the inhabitants. Fundamentals of daylighting and artificial lighting will first be introduced. More advanced and design-oriented topics will then be presented and practiced through the design project. The course focuses on the use and optimization of daylight in buildings and on its complementarity to artificial (electric) lighting, to aim at reducing the building's environmental impact while improving the visual comfort of the inhabitants. Fundamentals of daylighting and artificial lighting will first be introduced. More advanced and design-oriented topics will then be presented and practiced through the design project.

Subjects

Daylighting | Daylighting | natural light | natural light | light calculations | light calculations | software | software | electric light | electric light | spectra | spectra | spectrum | spectrum | luminance | luminance | chrominance | chrominance | comfort | comfort | design | design | sun | sun | solar gain | solar gain | diffusion | diffusion | glazing | glazing | fenestration | fenestration

License

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HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT) HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT)

Description

Survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationist vs. schema-based theories, comparison of music and speech perception, p Survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationist vs. schema-based theories, comparison of music and speech perception, p

Subjects

music perception | music perception | music cognition | music cognition | music memory | music memory | pitch | pitch | timbre | timbre | consonance | consonance | harmony | harmony | tonality | tonality | melody | melody | expressive timing | expressive timing | rhythmic hierarchies | rhythmic hierarchies | auditory perception | auditory perception | auditory pathway | auditory pathway | musical acoustics | musical acoustics | power spectra | power spectra | psychophysics | psychophysics | neurocomputational models | neurocomputational models | neural correlates | neural correlates | music therapy | music therapy | synesthesia | synesthesia | absolute pitch | absolute pitch

License

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8.901 Astrophysics I (MIT) 8.901 Astrophysics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to stellar astrophysics. It covers a variety of topics, ranging from stellar structure and evolution to galactic dynamics and dark matter. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to stellar astrophysics. It covers a variety of topics, ranging from stellar structure and evolution to galactic dynamics and dark matter.

Subjects

Historical astronomy | Historical astronomy | astronomical instrumentation | astronomical instrumentation | Stars: spectra | Stars: spectra | classification | classification | stellar structure equations | stellar structure equations | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | stellar oscillations | stellar oscillations | degenerate and collapsed stars | degenerate and collapsed stars | radio pulsars | radio pulsars | interacting binary systems | interacting binary systems | accretion disks | accretion disks | x-ray sources | x-ray sources | gravitational lenses | gravitational lenses | dark matter | dark matter | interstellar medium: HII regions | interstellar medium: HII regions | supernova remnants | supernova remnants | molecular clouds | molecular clouds | dust | dust | radiative transfer | radiative transfer | Jeans' mass | Jeans' mass | star formation | star formation | high-energy astrophysics | high-energy astrophysics | Compton scattering | Compton scattering | bremsstrahlung | bremsstrahlung | synchrotron radiation | synchrotron radiation | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | Galactic stellar distributions | Galactic stellar distributions | Oort constants | Oort constants | Oort limit | Oort limit | globular clusters. | globular clusters. | globular clusters | globular clusters

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Laboratory Phonology (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistic Theory: Laboratory Phonology (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to prepare you to engage in experimental investigations of questions related to linguistic theory, focusing on phonetics and phonology. The goal of this course is to prepare you to engage in experimental investigations of questions related to linguistic theory, focusing on phonetics and phonology.

Subjects

audition | audition | digital signal processing | digital signal processing | acoustics of vowels | acoustics of vowels | adaptive dispersion | adaptive dispersion | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | licensing by cue | licensing by cue | intonation | intonation | meaning of intonation | meaning of intonation | lexicon | lexicon | cntext | cntext | speech perception | speech perception | phonetics | phonetics | phonology | phonology | accent variation | accent variation | laboratory phonology | laboratory phonology | source-filter theory | source-filter theory | A/D conversion | A/D conversion | acoustics | acoustics

License

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18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT) 18.336 Numerical Methods of Applied Mathematics II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods. This graduate-level course is an advanced introduction to applications and theory of numerical methods for solution of differential equations. In particular, the course focuses on physically-arising partial differential equations, with emphasis on the fundamental ideas underlying various methods.

Subjects

Linear systems | Linear systems | Fast Fourier Transform | Fast Fourier Transform | Wave equation | Wave equation | Von Neumann analysis | Von Neumann analysis | Conditions for stability | Conditions for stability | Dissipation | Dissipation | Multistep schemes | Multistep schemes | Dispersion | Dispersion | Group Velocity | Group Velocity | Propagation of Wave Packets | Propagation of Wave Packets | Parabolic Equations | Parabolic Equations | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | The Du Fort Frankel Scheme | Convection-Diffusion equation | Convection-Diffusion equation | ADI Methods | ADI Methods | Elliptic Equations | Elliptic Equations | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | Jacobi | Gauss-Seidel and SOR(w) | ODEs | ODEs | finite differences | finite differences | spectral methods | spectral methods | well-posedness and stability | well-posedness and stability | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | boundary and nonlinear instabilities | Finite Difference Schemes | Finite Difference Schemes | Partial Differential Equations | Partial Differential Equations

License

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6.542J Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech (MIT) 6.542J Laboratory on the Physiology, Acoustics, and Perception of Speech (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements; measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production; computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech; synthesis of speech; perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds; speech prosody; models for speech recognition; speech disorders; and other topics.2 1-hour lectures per week2 labs per weekbrief lab reportsterm project, with short term paperno examsTechnical RequirementsMedia player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .wav files found on this course site. RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .ram files found on this course site. M The course focuses on experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements; measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production; computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech; synthesis of speech; perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds; speech prosody; models for speech recognition; speech disorders; and other topics.2 1-hour lectures per week2 labs per weekbrief lab reportsterm project, with short term paperno examsTechnical RequirementsMedia player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .wav files found on this course site. RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .ram files found on this course site. M

Subjects

Speech | Speech | speech disorders | speech disorders | speech recognition | speech recognition | speech prosody | speech prosody | waveform analysis | waveform analysis | spectral analysis | spectral analysis | 6.542 | 6.542 | 24.966 | 24.966 | HST.712 | HST.712

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite elements | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | linear programming

License

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2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT) 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).Prof. Pierre Lermusiaux is very grateful to the teaching assistants Dr. Matt Ueckermann, Dr. Tapovan Lolla, Mr. Jing Lin, and Mr. Arpit Agarwal for the This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®: Errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Topics covered include Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs).Prof. Pierre Lermusiaux is very grateful to the teaching assistants Dr. Matt Ueckermann, Dr. Tapovan Lolla, Mr. Jing Lin, and Mr. Arpit Agarwal for the

Subjects

errors | errors | condition numbers and roots of equations | condition numbers and roots of equations | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | direct and iterative methods for linear systems | finite differences for elliptic | finite differences for elliptic | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | parabolic and hyperbolic equations | Fourier decomposition | Fourier decomposition | error analysis | error analysis | and stability | and stability | high-order and compact finite-differences | high-order and compact finite-differences | finite volume methods | finite volume methods | time marching methods | time marching methods | Navier-Stokes solvers | Navier-Stokes solvers | grid generation | grid generation | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite volumes on complex geometries | finite element methods | finite element methods | spectral methods | spectral methods | boundary element and panel methods | boundary element and panel methods | turbulent flows | turbulent flows | boundary layers | boundary layers | Lagrangian Coherent Structures | Lagrangian Coherent Structures

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6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT) 6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters. This course examines signals, systems and inference as unifying themes in communication, control and signal processing. Topics include input-output and state-space models of linear systems driven by deterministic and random signals; time- and transform-domain representations in discrete and continuous time; group delay; state feedback and observers; probabilistic models; stochastic processes, correlation functions, power spectra, spectral factorization; least-mean square error estimation; Wiener filtering; hypothesis testing; detection; matched filters.

Subjects

signals and systems | signals and systems | transform representation | transform representation | state-space models | state-space models | state observers | state observers | state feedback | state feedback | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | random processes | random processes | power spectral density | power spectral density | hypothesis testing | hypothesis testing | signal detection | signal detection

License

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18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT) 18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. This graduate-level course is a continuation of Mathematical Methods for Engineers I (18.085). Topics include numerical methods; initial-value problems; network flows; and optimization.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .zip files found on this course site. MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.

Subjects

Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | Scientific computing: Fast Fourier Transform | finite differences | finite differences | finite elements | finite elements | spectral method | spectral method | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | Complex variables and applications | Complex variables and applications | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | Initial-value problems: stability or chaos in ordinary differential equations | wave equation versus heat equation | wave equation versus heat equation | conservation laws and shocks | conservation laws and shocks | dissipation and dispersion | dissipation and dispersion | Optimization: network flows | Optimization: network flows | linear programming | linear programming

License

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18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT) 18.311 Principles of Applied Mathematics (MIT)

Description

18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity. 18.311 Principles of Continuum Applied Mathematics covers fundamental concepts in continuous applied mathematics, including applications from traffic flow, fluids, elasticity, granular flows, etc. The class also covers continuum limit; conservation laws, quasi-equilibrium; kinematic waves; characteristics, simple waves, shocks; diffusion (linear and nonlinear); numerical solution of wave equations; finite differences, consistency, stability; discrete and fast Fourier transforms; spectral methods; transforms and series (Fourier, Laplace). Additional topics may include sonic booms, Mach cone, caustics, lattices, dispersion, and group velocity.

Subjects

partial differential equation | partial differential equation | hyperbolic equations | hyperbolic equations | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | hyperbolic systems | hyperbolic systems | diffusion and reaction processes | diffusion and reaction processes | continuum models | continuum models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | continuous applied mathematics | continuous applied mathematics | traffic flow | traffic flow | fluids | fluids | elasticity | elasticity | granular flows | granular flows | continuum limit | continuum limit | conservation laws | conservation laws | quasi-equilibrium | quasi-equilibrium | kinematic waves | kinematic waves | characteristics | characteristics | simple waves | simple waves | shocks | shocks | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | diffusion (linear and nonlinear) | numerical solution of wave equations | numerical solution of wave equations | finite differences | finite differences | consistency | consistency | stability | stability | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | discrete and fast Fourier transforms | spectral methods | spectral methods | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | transforms and series (Fourier | Laplace) | sonic booms | sonic booms | Mach cone | Mach cone | caustics | caustics | lattices | lattices | dispersion | dispersion | group velocity | group velocity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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