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15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT) 15.223 Global Markets, National Policies, and the Competitive Advantages of Firms (MIT)

Description

The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests. The final results of these debates will determine who wins and who loses in the new global economy. Understanding the interaction between environment and business around the world is the key to understanding both the possibilities for and

Subjects

globalization | globalization | market economies | market economies | liberal market economies | liberal market economies | state-driven development | state-driven development | emerging markets | emerging markets | intellectual property | intellectual property | ngo | ngo | sustainability | sustainability | trade policy | trade policy | international trade | international trade | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t.

Subjects

local economic development | local economic development | poverty | poverty | developing countries | developing countries | public-sector policies | public-sector policies | employment | employment | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards | political economy | political economy | poverty reduction | poverty reduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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What's this gadget? (LOC) What's this gadget? (LOC)

Description

Subjects

libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | acoustics | acoustics | physicists | physicists | nationalbureauofstandards | nationalbureauofstandards | usbureauofstandards | usbureauofstandards | acousticalresearch | acousticalresearch | vlchrisler | vlchrisler | vivianleroychrisler | vivianleroychrisler

License

No known copyright restrictions

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11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III (MIT) 11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III (MIT)

Description

This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job. This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.129 Educational Theory and Practice I (MIT) 11.129 Educational Theory and Practice I (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on a core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics covered in the class include educational reform, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component of the class. Assignments include readings from the educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, and practice teaching and constructing curriculum. This is the first of a three course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program. This course concentrates on a core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics covered in the class include educational reform, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component of the class. Assignments include readings from the educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, and practice teaching and constructing curriculum. This is the first of a three course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | problems | problems | philosophers | philosophers | think | think | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | freewill | freewill | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | standards | standards | moral conduct | moral conduct | history | history | contemporary authors | contemporary authors | skills | skills | critical | critical | argumentative | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT) 11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT)

Description

The class will explore the obstacles to achieving sustainability; in particular, the difficulties of managing common resources, achieving transboundary pollution control, making tradeoffs between economic and social development needs and environmental resource protection, and harmonizing environmental protection standards. At their core, these problems must be addressed through international or multi-lateral negotiations. We will focus especially on problems of representation and voting, issue linkage, balancing science and politics, and monitoring and enforcement in negotiations of these kinds. We will also examine these issues in light of actual treaty negotiations especially the on-going efforts to implement the Climate Change Convention. The class will operate as a research seminar. Ea The class will explore the obstacles to achieving sustainability; in particular, the difficulties of managing common resources, achieving transboundary pollution control, making tradeoffs between economic and social development needs and environmental resource protection, and harmonizing environmental protection standards. At their core, these problems must be addressed through international or multi-lateral negotiations. We will focus especially on problems of representation and voting, issue linkage, balancing science and politics, and monitoring and enforcement in negotiations of these kinds. We will also examine these issues in light of actual treaty negotiations especially the on-going efforts to implement the Climate Change Convention. The class will operate as a research seminar. Ea

Subjects

Sustainability | Sustainability | Managing common resources | Managing common resources | Transboundary pollution control | Transboundary pollution control | Economic and social development | Economic and social development | Environmental resource protection | Environmental resource protection | Environmental protection standards | Environmental protection standards | International or multi-lateral negotiations | International or multi-lateral negotiations | Representation and voting | Representation and voting | Issue linkage | Issue linkage | Balancing science and politics | Balancing science and politics | Climate Change Convention | Climate Change Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.125 Exploring K-12 Classroom Teaching (MIT) 11.125 Exploring K-12 Classroom Teaching (MIT)

Description

This subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment. This subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.126J Economics of Education (MIT) 11.126J Economics of Education (MIT)

Description

This course combines economic theory, econometric literature and institutional literature to examine current issues in U.S. education. Topics include human capital theory, the problem of disentangling the return to education from the return to innate ability, the role of education in national economic growth, the association between education and individual earnings and reasons why that relationship has changed over time, the main approaches to K-12 school reform, and the problem of increasing access to higher education. This course combines economic theory, econometric literature and institutional literature to examine current issues in U.S. education. Topics include human capital theory, the problem of disentangling the return to education from the return to innate ability, the role of education in national economic growth, the association between education and individual earnings and reasons why that relationship has changed over time, the main approaches to K-12 school reform, and the problem of increasing access to higher education.

Subjects

economics | economics | education | education | human capital theory | human capital theory | earnings | earnings | rate of return | rate of return | school reform | school reform | school standards | school standards | school vouchers | school vouchers | school assessments | school assessments | teacher quality | teacher quality | teacher training | teacher training | minority performance | minority performance | higher education | higher education | 11.126 | 11.126 | 14.48 | 14.48 | 11.249 | 11.249

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.125 Exploring K-12 Clasroom Teaching (MIT) 11.125 Exploring K-12 Clasroom Teaching (MIT)

Description

Subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment. Subject uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Reality (MIT) Reality (MIT)

Description

An examination of philosophical issues on the theme of relativism. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Discussion of these questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers such as Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, and Derek Parfit. Emphasis on ways of making these vague questions precise, and critical evaluation of philosophical arguments. An examination of philosophical issues on the theme of relativism. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Discussion of these questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers such as Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, and Derek Parfit. Emphasis on ways of making these vague questions precise, and critical evaluation of philosophical arguments.

Subjects

relativism | relativism | moral standards | moral standards | science | science | truth | truth | rationality | rationality | cultural norms | cultural norms | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | Karl Popper | Karl Popper | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Judith Thomson | Judith Thomson | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.188J Labor and Politics (MIT) 17.188J Labor and Politics (MIT)

Description

This graduate research and reading seminar examines an array of issues facing labor in today's global world. The premise of this course is that recent developments (e.g., globalization, liberalization, privatization, etc.) have created a mix of opportunities and risks for labor in most developing countries. This graduate research and reading seminar examines an array of issues facing labor in today's global world. The premise of this course is that recent developments (e.g., globalization, liberalization, privatization, etc.) have created a mix of opportunities and risks for labor in most developing countries.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | labor | labor | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | foreign investment | foreign investment | global supply chains | global supply chains | economic development | economic development | job growth | job growth | social safety nets | social safety nets | environmental standards | environmental standards | poverty | poverty

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT) 11.364 International Environmental Negotiation (MIT)

Description

This seminar will explore the difficulties of getting agreement on global definitions of sustainability; in particularly building international support for efforts to combat climate change created by greenhouse gas emissions as well as other international resource management efforts. We will focus on possible changes in the way global environmental agreements are formulated and implemented, especially on ways of shifting from the current "pollution control" approach to combating climate change to a more comprehensive strategy for taking advantage of sustainable development opportunities. This seminar will explore the difficulties of getting agreement on global definitions of sustainability; in particularly building international support for efforts to combat climate change created by greenhouse gas emissions as well as other international resource management efforts. We will focus on possible changes in the way global environmental agreements are formulated and implemented, especially on ways of shifting from the current "pollution control" approach to combating climate change to a more comprehensive strategy for taking advantage of sustainable development opportunities.

Subjects

sustainability | sustainability | managing common resources | managing common resources | transboundary pollution control | transboundary pollution control | economic development | economic development | social development | social development | environmental resource protection | environmental resource protection | environmental protection standardsinternational negotiations | environmental protection standardsinternational negotiations | multi-lateral negotiations | multi-lateral negotiations | representation | representation | voting | voting | issue linkage | issue linkage | balancing science and politics | balancing science and politics | Climate Change Convention | Climate Change Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.125 Introduction to Education: Understanding and Evaluating Education (MIT) 11.125 Introduction to Education: Understanding and Evaluating Education (MIT)

Description

This class uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment. This class uses K-12 classroom experiences, along with student-centered classroom activities and student-led classes, to explore issues in schools and education. Students in this course spend time each week observing pre-college math and science classes. Topics of study include design and implementation of curriculum, addressing the needs of a diversity of students, standards in math and science, student misconceptions, methods of instruction, the digital divide, teaching through different media, and student assessment.

Subjects

classroom experiences | classroom experiences | student-centered classroom activities | student-centered classroom activities | student-led classes | student-led classes | issues in schools and education | issues in schools and education | observing | observing | pre-college math and science classes | pre-college math and science classes | design and implementation of curriculum | design and implementation of curriculum | diversity | diversity | standards in math and science | standards in math and science | student misconceptions | student misconceptions | methods of instruction | methods of instruction | the digital divide | the digital divide | teaching through different media | teaching through different media | student assessment | student assessment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.965 Technology Strategy for System Design and Management (MIT) 15.965 Technology Strategy for System Design and Management (MIT)

Description

This course provides you with a framework to understand the structure and dynamics of high-tech businesses, together with an approach for their effective strategic management. It is focused on domains in which systems are important, because either or both products are parts of larger and more complex systems, or they are comprised of systems. The domains covered include computing, communications (in particular the mobile and IP domains), consumer electronics, industrial networking, automotive, aerospace and medical devices. The course will be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business in which technology will likely play a major role, and also to those interested in investing in or providing counsel to these businesses. The emphasis throughout is on the development a This course provides you with a framework to understand the structure and dynamics of high-tech businesses, together with an approach for their effective strategic management. It is focused on domains in which systems are important, because either or both products are parts of larger and more complex systems, or they are comprised of systems. The domains covered include computing, communications (in particular the mobile and IP domains), consumer electronics, industrial networking, automotive, aerospace and medical devices. The course will be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business in which technology will likely play a major role, and also to those interested in investing in or providing counsel to these businesses. The emphasis throughout is on the development a

Subjects

innovation | innovation | strategy | strategy | open source | open source | demand opportunity | demand opportunity | technology strategy | technology strategy | life-cycles | life-cycles | product development | product development | business ecosystems | business ecosystems | disruptive technologies | disruptive technologies | standards | standards | marketing | marketing | open innovation | open innovation | system design | system design | value capture | value capture | business implementation | business implementation

License

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15.912 Technology Strategy (MIT) 15.912 Technology Strategy (MIT)

Description

This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities. This is not a course in how to manage product or process development. The main focus is on the acquisition of a set of powerful analytical tools which are critical for the development of a technology strategy as an integral part of business strategy. These tools can provide the framework for deciding which technologies to invest in, how to structure those investments and how to anticipate and respond to the behavior of competitors, suppliers, a This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities. This is not a course in how to manage product or process development. The main focus is on the acquisition of a set of powerful analytical tools which are critical for the development of a technology strategy as an integral part of business strategy. These tools can provide the framework for deciding which technologies to invest in, how to structure those investments and how to anticipate and respond to the behavior of competitors, suppliers, a

Subjects

disruptive technology | disruptive technology | strategy | strategy | models | models | analysis | analysis | competition | competition | change | change | organizational competence | organizational competence | vertical integration | vertical integration | S-curves | S-curves | organizational strategy | organizational strategy | market evolution | market evolution | market dynamics | market dynamics | simple rules | simple rules | worse before better | worse before better | standards | standards | tipping | tipping | complementary assets | complementary assets | capturing value | capturing value | value chain | value chain | network effects | network effects | market share | market share | innovation | innovation

License

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Global Information Systems (MIT) Global Information Systems (MIT)

Description

The strategic importance of information technology is now widely accepted. It has also become increasingly clear that the identification of strategic applications alone does not result in success for an organization. A careful coordination of strategic applications, information technologies, and organizational structures must be made to attain success. This course addresses strategic, technological, and organizational connectivity issues to support effective and meaningful integration of information and systems. This course is especially relevant to those who wish to effectively exploit information technology and create new business processes and opportunities. The strategic importance of information technology is now widely accepted. It has also become increasingly clear that the identification of strategic applications alone does not result in success for an organization. A careful coordination of strategic applications, information technologies, and organizational structures must be made to attain success. This course addresses strategic, technological, and organizational connectivity issues to support effective and meaningful integration of information and systems. This course is especially relevant to those who wish to effectively exploit information technology and create new business processes and opportunities.

Subjects

information | information | stragegy | stragegy | connectivity | connectivity | business processes | business processes | application | application | data communication | data communication | database | database | web | web | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | distributed architecture | distributed architecture | emerging technology | emerging technology | transformation | transformation | standards | standards | 15.565 | 15.565 | 15.578 | 15.578 | ESD.565 | ESD.565

License

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15.343 Managing Transformations in Work, Organizations, and Society (MIT) 15.343 Managing Transformations in Work, Organizations, and Society (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on skills managers need to adapt to current sweeping changes in the nature of work and the workforce, in business organizations and their roles in society, and in the institutions that interact with work, particularly the labor market, community and family-centered groups. This year's teaching will be the basis for a workshop session at the Sloan School's 50th Anniversary Convocation. The course will involve a mix of on-campus and off-campus students taking the course via distance learning, and professionals from a variety of organizations who will participate in specific modules of interest to them. One session will be linked to colleagues at Cambridge University in England where a parallel course is being offered. Managerial issues addressed are associated with manag The course focuses on skills managers need to adapt to current sweeping changes in the nature of work and the workforce, in business organizations and their roles in society, and in the institutions that interact with work, particularly the labor market, community and family-centered groups. This year's teaching will be the basis for a workshop session at the Sloan School's 50th Anniversary Convocation. The course will involve a mix of on-campus and off-campus students taking the course via distance learning, and professionals from a variety of organizations who will participate in specific modules of interest to them. One session will be linked to colleagues at Cambridge University in England where a parallel course is being offered. Managerial issues addressed are associated with manag

Subjects

Theory X and Theory Y | Theory X and Theory Y | employee motivation | employee motivation | changing nature of work | changing nature of work | business and society | business and society | global standards | global standards | corporate responsibility | corporate responsibility | business and the environment | business and the environment | sustainable business | sustainable business | labor-management partnership | labor-management partnership | knowledge based work systems | knowledge based work systems | knowledge work | knowledge work | knowledge management | knowledge management | managing cultural diversity | managing cultural diversity | global organizations | global organizations | transforming government | transforming government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT) 24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT)

Description

Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them.

Subjects

relativism | relativism | moral standards | moral standards | science | science | truth | truth | rationality | rationality | cultural norms | cultural norms | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | Karl Popper | Karl Popper | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Judith Thomson | Judith Thomson | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT) ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g

Subjects

Politics | Politics | decision making | decision making | negotiation | negotiation | planning | planning | wedge game | wedge game | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | NRC | NRC | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | government | government | public policy | public policy | globalization | globalization | science | science | EPA | EPA | NSF | NSF | transportation | transportation | urban planning | urban planning | standards | standards | risk | risk | risk assessment | risk assessment | engineering | engineering | energy | energy | internet | internet | network neutrality | network neutrality | regulation | regulation | security | security | 9/11 | 9/11 | September 11 | September 11 | terrorism | terrorism | defense | defense | tradeoff | tradeoff

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | environment | environment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.264J Database, Internet, and Systems Integration Technologies (MIT) 1.264J Database, Internet, and Systems Integration Technologies (MIT)

Description

This course addresses information technology fundamentals, including project management and software processes, data modeling, UML, relational databases and SQL. Topics covered include internet technologies, such as XML, web services, and service-oriented architectures. This course provides an introduction to security and presents the fundamentals of telecommunications and includes a project that involves requirements / design, data model, database implementation, website, security and data network. No prior programming experience required. This course addresses information technology fundamentals, including project management and software processes, data modeling, UML, relational databases and SQL. Topics covered include internet technologies, such as XML, web services, and service-oriented architectures. This course provides an introduction to security and presents the fundamentals of telecommunications and includes a project that involves requirements / design, data model, database implementation, website, security and data network. No prior programming experience required.

Subjects

1.264 | 1.264 | ESD.264 | ESD.264 | information technology | information technology | software development | software development | data modeling | data modeling | database | database | application development | application development | web standards | web standards | system integration | system integration | security | security | data communications | data communications | good software process | good software process | supply chain | supply chain | transportation | transportation | civil engineering | civil engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.264J Database, Internet, and Systems Integration Technologies (MIT) 1.264J Database, Internet, and Systems Integration Technologies (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive review of information technology. It covers topics in software development methods, data modeling and databases, application development, Web standards and development, system integration, security, and data communications. Most of the homework sets lead the class through a project in which a database and Web application are designed and constructed, using good software process and addressing security, network and other issues. The project, which is done in two-person teams, provides hands-on experience to complement the lectures and readings. Recitations discuss readings and provide more detailed information on the software tools used. The course goal is to cover the key concepts in the major areas of information technology, to enable students to successfully This course is an intensive review of information technology. It covers topics in software development methods, data modeling and databases, application development, Web standards and development, system integration, security, and data communications. Most of the homework sets lead the class through a project in which a database and Web application are designed and constructed, using good software process and addressing security, network and other issues. The project, which is done in two-person teams, provides hands-on experience to complement the lectures and readings. Recitations discuss readings and provide more detailed information on the software tools used. The course goal is to cover the key concepts in the major areas of information technology, to enable students to successfully

Subjects

information technology | information technology | software development | software development | data modeling | data modeling | database | database | application development | application development | web standards | web standards | system integration | system integration | security | security | data communications | data communications | good software process | good software process | supply chain | supply chain | transportation | transportation | civil engineering | civil engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | enviroment | enviroment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact"). The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact").

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context | mind | mind | matter | matter | scientific | scientific | natural reality | natural reality | virtual | virtual | Darwin | Darwin | life | life | discover | discover | machine | machine | natural history | natural history | reality | reality | educational technology | educational technology | design and experimentation | design and experimentation | education reform | education reform | standards and standardized testing | standards and standardized testing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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