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2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304) (MIT) 2.854 Manufacturing Systems I (SMA 6304) (MIT)

Description

As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks include process analysis, queuing theory, simulation, forecasting, inventory theory and linear programming. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 6304 (Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models). As the first in a sequence of four half-term courses, this course will provide the fundamental building blocks for conceptualizing, understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains. These building blocks include process analysis, queuing theory, simulation, forecasting, inventory theory and linear programming. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 6304 (Manufacturing Systems I: Analytical Methods and Flow Models).

Subjects

conceptualizing | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | process analysis | process analysis | queueing theory | queueing theory | simulation | simulation | forecasting | forecasting | inventory theory | inventory theory | linear programming | linear programming | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | conceptualizing | understanding and optimizing manufacturing systems and supply chains | SMA 6304 | SMA 6304

License

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9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT) 9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT)

Description

What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding. What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding.

Subjects

circuits | mechanisms and representation | circuits | mechanisms and representation | recognition of a visual scene | recognition of a visual scene | Scene Understanding | Scene Understanding | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | cognitive neuroscience | cognitive neuroscience | visual cognition | visual cognition | computational neuroscience | computational neuroscience | computer vision | computer vision | natural image categorization | natural image categorization | contextual effects on object recognition | contextual effects on object recognition | role of attention in scene understanding | role of attention in scene understanding

License

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Building a Business 2012/13: Understanding Financial Control

Description

Simon Husband is the Director of Richardsons Financial Group. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

start up | entrepreneurship | simon husband | Building a business | understanding financial control | start up | entrepreneurship | simon husband | Building a business | understanding financial control

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Analysis (MIT) Analysis (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of characterizing and recognizing patterns and features of interest in numerical data. Basic tools and theory for signal understanding problems with applications to user modeling, affect recognition, speech recognition and understanding, computer vision, physiological analysis, and more. Decision theory, statistical classification, maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, non-parametric methods, unsupervised learning and clustering. Additional topics on machine and human learning from active research. Fundamentals of characterizing and recognizing patterns and features of interest in numerical data. Basic tools and theory for signal understanding problems with applications to user modeling, affect recognition, speech recognition and understanding, computer vision, physiological analysis, and more. Decision theory, statistical classification, maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, non-parametric methods, unsupervised learning and clustering. Additional topics on machine and human learning from active research.

Subjects

machine and human learning | machine and human learning | unsupervised learning and clustering | unsupervised learning and clustering | non-parametric methods | non-parametric methods | Bayesian estimation | Bayesian estimation | maximum likelihood | maximum likelihood | statistical classification | statistical classification | decision theory | decision theory | physiological analysis | physiological analysis | computer vision | computer vision | peech recognition and understanding | peech recognition and understanding | recognition | recognition | numerical data | numerical data | 1.126 | 1.126

License

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4.170 Ecuador Workshop (MIT) 4.170 Ecuador Workshop (MIT)

Description

This is a project to assist in the design, drawing, modeling and hopefully constructing of a small Community Children's Center near Guayaquil, Ecuador. For the last year, Nicki Lehrer, from MIT's Aero/Astro Department, has been organizing efforts to build the project. The goal of the workshop is to provide her with a full fleshed out design for the community center so it can be built in the summer of 2007. This is a project to assist in the design, drawing, modeling and hopefully constructing of a small Community Children's Center near Guayaquil, Ecuador. For the last year, Nicki Lehrer, from MIT's Aero/Astro Department, has been organizing efforts to build the project. The goal of the workshop is to provide her with a full fleshed out design for the community center so it can be built in the summer of 2007.

Subjects

Ecuador | Ecuador | Pascuales | Pascuales | Guayaquil | Guayaquil | charity | charity | orphanage | orphanage | community center | community center | poverty | poverty | wealth | wealth | giving | giving | public space | public space | architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | space | space | Space Between | Space Between | urban design | urban design | urban redesign | urban redesign | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | cultural understanding | cultural understanding | path | path | place | place | space as activator | space as activator

License

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4.144 Architectural Design, Level II: New Orleans Studio (MIT) 4.144 Architectural Design, Level II: New Orleans Studio (MIT)

Description

The project for this studio is to design a demonstration project for a site near the French Quarter in New Orleans. The objectives of the project are the following: To design more intense housing, community, educational and commercial facilities in four to six story buildings. To explore the "space between" buildings as a way of designing and shaping objects. To design at three scales - dwelling, cluster and overall. To design dwellings where the owners may be able to help build and gain a skill for employment. To provide/design facilities that can help the residents to gain education and skills. The project for this studio is to design a demonstration project for a site near the French Quarter in New Orleans. The objectives of the project are the following: To design more intense housing, community, educational and commercial facilities in four to six story buildings. To explore the "space between" buildings as a way of designing and shaping objects. To design at three scales - dwelling, cluster and overall. To design dwellings where the owners may be able to help build and gain a skill for employment. To provide/design facilities that can help the residents to gain education and skills.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | space | space | Space Between | Space Between | urban design | urban design | urban redesign | urban redesign | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | cultural understanding | cultural understanding | path | path | place | place | space as activator | space as activator

License

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4.125A Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT) 4.125A Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models. This class was taught concurrently with 4.125B. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together. This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models. This class was taught concurrently with 4.125B. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | space | space | Space Between | Space Between | urban design | urban design | urban redesign | urban redesign | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | cultural understanding | cultural understanding | path | path | place | place | space as activator | space as activator

License

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4.125B Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT) 4.125B Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models. This class was taught concurrently with course 4.125A. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together. This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models. This class was taught concurrently with course 4.125A. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | space | space | Space Between | Space Between | urban design | urban design | urban redesign | urban redesign | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | cultural understanding | cultural understanding | path | path | place | place | space as activator | space as activator

License

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4.171 The Space Between Workshop (MIT) 4.171 The Space Between Workshop (MIT)

Description

This workshop explores how designers might become as sensitive to space as they are to objects. Through a number of projects and precedent studies, architectural design is studied in relation to the Space Between. The design process is studied in reverse, considering space first and objects second. This is not to imply that objects are not important, but rather that space is equally important. This workshop explores how designers might become as sensitive to space as they are to objects. Through a number of projects and precedent studies, architectural design is studied in relation to the Space Between. The design process is studied in reverse, considering space first and objects second. This is not to imply that objects are not important, but rather that space is equally important.

Subjects

Architecture | Architecture | Tectonics | Tectonics | Place Making | Place Making | Space | Space | Space Between | Space Between | Urban Design | Urban Design | Urban Redesign | Urban Redesign | Village | Village | Neighborhood | Neighborhood | Mixed-use Public Space | Mixed-use Public Space | Light and Space | Light and Space | Affordable Design | Affordable Design | Green Design | Green Design | LEED | LEED | Cultural Understanding | Cultural Understanding | Path | Path | Place | Place | Space as activator. | Space as activator.

License

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4.196 Architecture Design, Level II: Cuba Studio (MIT) 4.196 Architecture Design, Level II: Cuba Studio (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This architectural studio will have one main project for the semester: to explore the issues surrounding the redesign of an area in Havana, Cuba. It is a typical area about the size of a Law of Indies block that presently has a mix of housing, work, and shopping, in buildings that need to be replaced and others that need to be rehabilitated. There is also vacant land, and buildings that are unused. Part of the blocks front on the Malecon, the street next to the water. The other edge fronts onto a typical neighborhood. The intention is to study the culture through an understanding of one area of Havana and then design an "echo" in architectural form. The design will include public space as well as a mix of buildings: some new, Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This architectural studio will have one main project for the semester: to explore the issues surrounding the redesign of an area in Havana, Cuba. It is a typical area about the size of a Law of Indies block that presently has a mix of housing, work, and shopping, in buildings that need to be replaced and others that need to be rehabilitated. There is also vacant land, and buildings that are unused. Part of the blocks front on the Malecon, the street next to the water. The other edge fronts onto a typical neighborhood. The intention is to study the culture through an understanding of one area of Havana and then design an "echo" in architectural form. The design will include public space as well as a mix of buildings: some new,

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | urban design | urban design | Cuba | Cuba | urban redesign | urban redesign | Havana | Havana | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | cultural understanding | cultural understanding

License

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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

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6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT) 6.345 Automatic Speech Recognition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. 6.345 introduces students to the rapidly developing field of automatic speech recognition. Its content is divided into three parts. Part I deals with background material in the acoustic theory of speech production, acoustic-phonetics, and signal representation. Part II describes algorithmic aspects of speech recognition systems including pattern classification, search algorithms, stochastic modelling, and language modelling techniques. Part III compares and contrasts the various approaches to speech recognition, and describes advanced techniques used for acoustic-phonetic modelling, robust speech recognition, speaker adaptation, processing paralinguistic information, speech understanding, and multimodal processing.

Subjects

speech recognition | speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | automatic speech recognition | acoustic theory | acoustic theory | speech production | speech production | acoustic-phonetics | acoustic-phonetics | signal representation | signal representation | pattern classification | pattern classification | search algorithms | search algorithms | stochastic modelling | stochastic modelling | language modelling | language modelling | speaker adaptation | speaker adaptation | paralinguistic information | paralinguistic information | speech understanding | speech understanding | multimodal processing | multimodal processing

License

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

License

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

This is the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Urban Design Studio, which is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning. The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important, often controversial, sites and projects. Since 1995, almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio, making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the U.S. It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education. The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghu This is the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Urban Design Studio, which is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning. The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important, often controversial, sites and projects. Since 1995, almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio, making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the U.S. It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education. The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghu

Subjects

China | China | Beijing | Beijing | urban planning | urban planning | international relations | international relations | site planning | site planning | building use | building use | services | services | zoning | zoning | urban improvement | urban improvement | reuse | reuse | green building | green building | cultural understanding | cultural understanding | architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | place making | place making | space | space | Space Between | Space Between | urban design | urban design | urban redesign | urban redesign | village | village | neighborhood | neighborhood | mixed-use public space | mixed-use public space | light and space | light and space | affordable design | affordable design | green design | green design | LEED | LEED | path | path | place | place | space as activator | space as activator

License

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11.946J Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.946J Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

The Beijing Urban Design Studio is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning. The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important, often controversial, sites and projects. Since 1995, almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio, making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the US. It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education. The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghua University and two brie The Beijing Urban Design Studio is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning. The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important, often controversial, sites and projects. Since 1995, almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio, making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the US. It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education. The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghua University and two brie

Subjects

China | China | Beijing | Beijing | Urban planning | Urban planning | International relations | International relations | Site planning | Site planning | Building use | Building use | Services | Services | Zoning | Zoning | Urban improvement | Urban improvement | Reuse | Reuse | Green building | Green building | Cultural understanding | Cultural understanding | 11.946 | 11.946 | 4.185 | 4.185

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.962 Common Sense Reasoning for Interactive Applications (MIT) MAS.962 Common Sense Reasoning for Interactive Applications (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the state of the art in common sense knowledge, and class projects will design and build interfaces that can exploit this knowledge to make more usable and helpful interfaces. This year's theme will be about how common sense knowledge differs in different languages and cultures, and how machine understanding of this knowledge can help increase communication between people, and between people and machines. This course will explore the state of the art in common sense knowledge, and class projects will design and build interfaces that can exploit this knowledge to make more usable and helpful interfaces. This year's theme will be about how common sense knowledge differs in different languages and cultures, and how machine understanding of this knowledge can help increase communication between people, and between people and machines.

Subjects

common sense reasoning | common sense reasoning | interactive applications | interactive applications | language | language | culture | culture | inference | inference | user goals | user goals | education | education | knowledge collection | knowledge collection | knowledge quality | knowledge quality | semantics | semantics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | interface design | interface design | partial knowledge | partial knowledge | human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | machine understanding | machine understanding | common sense knowledge | common sense knowledge

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.014 Principles and Practice of Science Communication (MIT) STS.014 Principles and Practice of Science Communication (MIT)

Description

This course helps in developing skills as science communicators through projects and analysis of theoretical principles. Case studies explore the emergence of popular science communication over the past two centuries and consider the relationships among authors, audiences and media. Project topics are identified early in the term and students work with MIT Museum staff. Projects may include physical exhibits, practical demonstrations, or scripts for public programs. This course helps in developing skills as science communicators through projects and analysis of theoretical principles. Case studies explore the emergence of popular science communication over the past two centuries and consider the relationships among authors, audiences and media. Project topics are identified early in the term and students work with MIT Museum staff. Projects may include physical exhibits, practical demonstrations, or scripts for public programs.

Subjects

public understanding of science | public understanding of science | science writing | science writing | museum | museum | exhibit | exhibit | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | stem cell | stem cell | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | intelligent design | intelligent design | GMA | GMA | genetically modified food | genetically modified food | biotechnology | biotechnology | bioengineering | bioengineering | risk | risk | journal | journal | newspaper | newspaper | radio | radio | fraud | fraud | cloning | cloning | evolution | evolution | controversy | controversy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.4 John Locke

Description

Part 2.4. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism | perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.4 John Locke

Description

Part 2.4. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism | perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Art and war Art and war

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module will focus on the treatment of war or the representation of war in art broadly conceived: war stories, war photography, war paintings, war films, war music, even war architecture - war memorials and war museums. It will seek to ask in what ways such works contribute to our understanding of war, and by extension our understanding of international relations. How effective are they? Can works of the imagination - works of art - reach parts that other works cannot reach? How? What strategies do they employ? Do they have to be explicit? Do they have to be easy to read (or watch or listen to)? In what ways are we affected by them? What difference can they make? Module This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module will focus on the treatment of war or the representation of war in art broadly conceived: war stories, war photography, war paintings, war films, war music, even war architecture - war memorials and war museums. It will seek to ask in what ways such works contribute to our understanding of war, and by extension our understanding of international relations. How effective are they? Can works of the imagination - works of art - reach parts that other works cannot reach? How? What strategies do they employ? Do they have to be explicit? Do they have to be easy to read (or watch or listen to)? In what ways are we affected by them? What difference can they make? Module

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M14060 | Module Code: M14060 | Module Code: M14061 | Module Code: M14061 | representation of war in art | representation of war in art | war stories | war stories | war photography | war photography | war museums | war museums | understanding of war | understanding of war | war architecture | war architecture

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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2.4 John Locke

Description

Part 2.4. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc).

Subjects

perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism | perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact"). The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact").

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context | mind | mind | matter | matter | scientific | scientific | natural reality | natural reality | virtual | virtual | Darwin | Darwin | life | life | discover | discover | machine | machine | natural history | natural history | reality | reality | educational technology | educational technology | design and experimentation | design and experimentation | education reform | education reform | standards and standardized testing | standards and standardized testing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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