Searching for storytelling : 89 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4

21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini. This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini.

Subjects

film history | film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | early film | early film | D.W. Griffith | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Renoir | Ford | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | Altman | DeSica | DeSica | narrative | narrative | video | video | visual communication | visual communication | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | hollywood | hollywood | cinema | cinema | movie | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT) MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT)

Description

This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art. This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art.

Subjects

analysis | analysis | synthesis | synthesis | computational media | computational media | computational and traditional arts | computational and traditional arts | design | design | programming | programming | javascript | javascript | contemporary digital art | contemporary digital art | machine age | machine age | media design | media design | analog vs digital art | analog vs digital art | graphic design | graphic design | web design | web design | photography | photography | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | computation | computation | arts | arts | design exercises | design exercises | studio | studio | analog art | analog art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.016J The City (MIT) 11.016J The City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | development | development | urban form | urban form | downtown | downtown | inner-city | inner-city | suburb | suburb | edge city | edge city | Boston | Boston | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation. The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT) 4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling. This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | video recording | video recording | editing | editing | self-exploration | self-exploration | performance | performance | social critique | social critique | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | narrative | narrative | abstract | abstract | documentary | documentary | essay | essay | video capture | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT) 4.366 Advanced Projects in the Visual Arts: Personal Narrative (MIT)

Description

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure. This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | story trajectory | story trajectory | character development | character development | verisimilitude | verisimilitude | time-space continuity | time-space continuity | viewer identification | viewer identification | suspension of disbelief | suspension of disbelief | closure | closure | narrative cinema | narrative cinema | speculative biography | speculative biography | conceptual video | conceptual video | the fake | the fake | the remake | the remake | domestic ethnography | domestic ethnography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT) 21L.011 The Film Experience (MIT)

Description

This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang. This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang.

Subjects

film history | film history | American culture | American culture | Hollywood | Hollywood | Fred Ott | Fred Ott | early film | early film | D.W. Griffith | D.W. Griffith | Buster Keaton | Buster Keaton | Charlie Chaplin | Charlie Chaplin | Renoir | Ford | Renoir | Ford | Hitchcock | Hitchcock | Altman | DeSica | Altman | DeSica | narrative | narrative | video | video | visual communication | visual communication | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | hollywood | hollywood | cinema | cinema | movie | movie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT) 11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class website can be found here: Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class website can be found here: Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | photography | photography | photographs | photographs | detail | detail | portfolio | portfolio | 11.309 | 11.309 | 4.215 | 4.215

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.277 Special Seminar in Communications: Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching (MIT) 15.277 Special Seminar in Communications: Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching (MIT)

Description

This course builds on the work done concurrently in 15.280 Communication for Managers and 15.311 Organizational Processes in the first semester of the MBA program. 15.280 is offered for 6 units and 15.277 provides an additional 3 units for a total of 9 units in Managerial Communication. 15.277 acts as a lab component to 15.280 and provides students additional opportunities to hone their communication skills through a variety of in-class exercises. Emphasis is on both individual and team communication. This course builds on the work done concurrently in 15.280 Communication for Managers and 15.311 Organizational Processes in the first semester of the MBA program. 15.280 is offered for 6 units and 15.277 provides an additional 3 units for a total of 9 units in Managerial Communication. 15.277 acts as a lab component to 15.280 and provides students additional opportunities to hone their communication skills through a variety of in-class exercises. Emphasis is on both individual and team communication.

Subjects

receiving feedback | receiving feedback | storytelling | storytelling | leadership vision | leadership vision | communication | communication | communication for managers | communication for managers | team communication | team communication | culture and leadership | culture and leadership | managing conflict | managing conflict | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | Distributed Leadership Model | Distributed Leadership Model | Organizational Processes | Organizational Processes | informational interviewing | informational interviewing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT) 21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission, This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission,

Subjects

literature | literature | western | western | narrative | narrative | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | epic | epic | novel | novel | performance | performance | film | film | video games | video games | ideology | ideology | psychology | psychology | technology | technology | culture | culture | literary theory | literary theory | anthropology | anthropology | communication | communication | Homer | Homer | Sophocles | Sophocles | Herodotus | Herodotus | Christian evangelists | Christian evangelists | Marie de France | Marie de France | Cervantes | Cervantes | La Clos | La Clos | Poe | Poe | Lang | Lang | Cocteau | Cocteau | Disney | Disney | Pixar | Pixar | Maxis | Maxis | Electronic Arts | Electronic Arts | Propp | Propp | Bakhtin | Bakhtin | Girard | Girard | Freud | Freud | Marx | Marx

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities

Subjects

literature | literature | comparative mass media | comparative mass media | communication | communication | modern culture | modern culture | social values | social values | politics | politics | radio | radio | television | television | film | film | print | print | digital techonology | digital techonology | history | history | storytelling | storytelling | advertising | advertising | oral | oral | culture | culture | photography | photography | oral culture | oral culture | cultural forms | cultural forms | political beliefs | political beliefs | economics | economics | mediated communication | mediated communication | class politics | class politics | gender | gender | race | race | identity | identity | behavior | behavior | criticism | criticism | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | consumers | consumers | theatrical | theatrical | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | cinema | cinema | theatre | theatre | printing | printing | publishing | publishing | books | books | electronic | electronic | transformations | transformations | narrative | narrative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT) MAS.961 Special Topics: Designing Sociable Media (MIT)

Description

This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy. This project-based course explores new design strategies for social interaction in the computer mediated world. Through weekly readings and design assignments we will examine topics such as: Data-based portraiture Depicting growth, change and the passage of time Visualizing conversations, crowds, and networks Interfaces for the connected city Mobile social technologies The course emphasizes developing visual and interactive literacy.

Subjects

online | online | online behavior | online behavior | internet | internet | interface | interface | interaction | interaction | cultural mores | cultural mores | social cues | social cues | virtual world | virtual world | on-line community | on-line community | social networking | social networking | storytelling | storytelling | persona | persona | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | email | email | IM | IM | cooperation | cooperation | marketing | marketing | surveillance | surveillance | creativity | creativity | connection | connection | conversation | conversation | mobility | mobility | web design | web design | conceptual metaphor | conceptual metaphor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-MAS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT) MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT)

Description

This class covers the history of 20th century art and design from the perspective of the technologist. Methods for visual analysis, oral critique, and digital expression are introduced. Class projects this term use the OLPC XO (One Laptop Per Child) laptop, Csound and Python software. This class covers the history of 20th century art and design from the perspective of the technologist. Methods for visual analysis, oral critique, and digital expression are introduced. Class projects this term use the OLPC XO (One Laptop Per Child) laptop, Csound and Python software.

Subjects

analysis | analysis | synthesis | synthesis | computational media | computational media | computational and traditional arts | computational and traditional arts | typography | typography | design | design | programming | programming | javascript | javascript | contemporary digital art | contemporary digital art | machine age | machine age | media design | media design | analog vs digital art | analog vs digital art | graphic design | graphic design | web design | web design | photography | photography | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | internet design | internet design | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | XO laptop | XO laptop | OLPC | OLPC

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-MAS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT) MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester. This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester.

Subjects

Storytelling | Storytelling | human communication | human communication | representation | representation | causality | causality | live media | live media | recorded media | recorded media | computation | computation | user interface | user interface | interaction | interaction | digital media | digital media | information and story | information and story | authoring | authoring | interface | interface | computer-assisted storytelling | computer-assisted storytelling | cinema | cinema | film | film | television | television | mass media | mass media | narrative | narrative | voice | voice | information | information | story | story | character | character | dynamic situation | dynamic situation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-MAS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT) 21L.432 Understanding Television (MIT)

Description

The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation. The subtitle of this course for the spring 2003 term is "American Television: A Cultural History." The class takes a cultural approach to television's evolution as a technology and system of representation, considering television as a system of storytelling and myth-making, and as a cultural practice, studied from anthropological, literary, and cinematic perspectives. The course focuses on prime-time commercial broadcasting, the medium's technological and economic history, and theoretical perspectives. There is much required viewing as well as readings in media theory and cultural interpretation.

Subjects

systems of representation | systems of representation | storytelling | storytelling | myth | myth | cultural practice | cultural practice | anthropology | anthropology | literature | literature | cinematogaphy | cinematogaphy | prime-time | prime-time | commercial broadcasting | commercial broadcasting | media theory | media theory | cultural interpretation | cultural interpretation | CMS.915 | CMS.915

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing or investigating urban landscapes, and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on light, detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning. The current version of the class website for the course can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing or investigating urban landscapes, and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on light, detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning. The current version of the class website for the course can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

photography | photography | landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class Web site can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class Web site can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.309 | 11.309 | 4.215 | 4.215

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata