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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

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7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT) 7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies. This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies.

Subjects

human disease | human disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of cancer | molecular basis of cancer | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of cancer | cellular basis of cancer | genetics of simple and complex traits | genetics of simple and complex traits | karyotypic analysis | karyotypic analysis | positional cloning | positional cloning | genetic diagnosis | genetic diagnosis | roles of oncogenes | roles of oncogenes | tumor suppressors | tumor suppressors | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | tumor progression | tumor progression | tumor treatment | tumor treatment | interaction between genetics and environment | interaction between genetics and environment | animal models of human disease | animal models of human disease | cancer | cancer | conventional treatment strategies | conventional treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies

License

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15.369 Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development (MIT) 15.369 Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development (MIT)

Description

This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers. This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers.

Subjects

new product development | new product development | internal venturing | internal venturing | corporate venture capital | corporate venture capital | Collaborative technology acquisition | Collaborative technology acquisition | venture creation | venture creation | internal venture strategies | internal venture strategies | external venture strategies | external venture strategies | internal entrepreneurship | internal entrepreneurship

License

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT) 15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality. This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | strategy games | strategy games | strategic thinking | strategic thinking | business strategy | business strategy | strategic reasoning | strategic reasoning | rationality | rationality | dominant strategies | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | entering new markets | new market entry | new market entry | brinksmanship | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiation | negotiating | negotiating | auctions | auctions | auction theory | auction theory | revenue equivalence | revenue equivalence | bidding | bidding | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | risk manipulation | adverse selection | adverse selection | moral hazard | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma

License

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4.430 Daylighting (MIT) 4.430 Daylighting (MIT)

Description

This class provides the tools necessary for an efficient integration of daylighting issues in the overall design of a building. The fundamentals of daylighting and electric lighting are introduced and their relevance to design decisions emphasized: benefits and availability of daylight, solar radiation and sun course, photometry, vision and color perception, daylighting metrics, visual and thermal comfort, electric lighting. More advanced topics are presented and practiced through the design project and homework assignments, such as primary and advanced lighting design strategies, and design and assessment tools for lighting management. This class provides the tools necessary for an efficient integration of daylighting issues in the overall design of a building. The fundamentals of daylighting and electric lighting are introduced and their relevance to design decisions emphasized: benefits and availability of daylight, solar radiation and sun course, photometry, vision and color perception, daylighting metrics, visual and thermal comfort, electric lighting. More advanced topics are presented and practiced through the design project and homework assignments, such as primary and advanced lighting design strategies, and design and assessment tools for lighting management.

Subjects

daylighting | daylighting | efficient integration | efficient integration | design of a building | design of a building | electric lighting | electric lighting | solar radiation | solar radiation | sun course | sun course | photometry | photometry | vision and color perception | vision and color perception | daylighting metrics | daylighting metrics | visual and thermal comfort | visual and thermal comfort | advanced lighting design strategies | advanced lighting design strategies | lighting management | lighting management

License

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15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT) 15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT)

Description

15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA

Subjects

supply chain strategies | supply chain strategies | companies | companies | supply chain components | supply chain components | concepts and models | concepts and models | key tradeoffs and phenomena | key tradeoffs and phenomena | risk pooling and inventory placement | risk pooling and inventory placement | integrated planning and collaboration | integrated planning and collaboration | and information sharing | and information sharing | supply chain analysis and optimization | supply chain analysis and optimization | information sharing | information sharing | 15.762 | 15.762 | 1.273 | 1.273 | ESD.267 | ESD.267 | SMA 6305 | SMA 6305

License

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21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT) 21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT)

Description

This subject focuses on the ways in which we read, providing an overview of some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In each case our task will be, first, to work through the selected reading in order to see how it determines or defines the task of literary interpretation; second, to locate the limits of each particular approach; and finally, to trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to the achievements and limitations of what came before. The literary texts and films that accompany the theoretical material will serve as concrete cases that allow us to see theory in action. In general, then, each week we wil This subject focuses on the ways in which we read, providing an overview of some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In each case our task will be, first, to work through the selected reading in order to see how it determines or defines the task of literary interpretation; second, to locate the limits of each particular approach; and finally, to trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to the achievements and limitations of what came before. The literary texts and films that accompany the theoretical material will serve as concrete cases that allow us to see theory in action. In general, then, each week we wil

Subjects

strategies of reading | comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century | strategies of reading | comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | interpretative approach | interpretative approach | film | film | literature | literature

License

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

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5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT) 5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT)

Description

This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules. This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | crystal structure refinement | crystal structure refinement | practical aspects | practical aspects | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | data collection | data collection | strategies | strategies | data reduction | data reduction | refinement problems | refinement problems | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | molecules | molecules | SHELXL | SHELXL | hydrogen atoms | hydrogen atoms | disorder | disorder | pseudo symmetry | pseudo symmetry | merohedral twins | merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | twinning | twinning | non-merohedral twins | non-merohedral twins | PLATON | PLATON

License

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5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT) 5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT)

Description

This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules. This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | crystal structure refinement | crystal structure refinement | practical aspects | practical aspects | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | data collection | data collection | strategies | strategies | data reduction | data reduction | refinement problems | refinement problems | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | molecules | molecules | SHELXL | SHELXL | hydrogen atoms | hydrogen atoms | disorder | disorder | pseudo symmetry | pseudo symmetry | merohedral twins | merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | twinning | twinning | non-merohedral twins | non-merohedral twins | PLATON | PLATON

License

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15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT) 15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies. This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies.

Subjects

strategic management | strategic management | delta project | delta project | corporate | corporate | business | business | functional strategies | functional strategies | business management | business management | business processes | business processes | efficiency | efficiency | business model | business model | strategic planning | strategic planning

License

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15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT) 15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies. This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies.

Subjects

strategic management | strategic management | delta project | delta project | corporate | corporate | business | business | functional strategies | functional strategies

License

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2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT) 2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT)

Description

The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly

Subjects

mechanical assembly | | mechanical assembly | | product development | | product development | | assembly automation | | assembly automation | | rigid part mating | | rigid part mating | | compliant part mating | | compliant part mating | | remote center compliance | | remote center compliance | | product architecture | | product architecture | | feature-based design | | feature-based design | | assembly sequence analysis | | assembly sequence analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | tolerances | | tolerances | | system-level design for assembly | | system-level design for assembly | | JIT methods | | JIT methods | | economics of assembly automation | | economics of assembly automation | | mass customization | | mass customization | | management of variety | | management of variety | | product family strategies | product family strategies

License

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | presiden | presiden | terror; war | terror; war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security | terror | terror | war | war

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control (MIT) 10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control (MIT)

Description

Introduction to dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; model-based control; applications to process equipment.Technical RequirementsAny number of software tools can be used to import the .csv files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recommendations.MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc. Introduction to dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; model-based control; applications to process equipment.Technical RequirementsAny number of software tools can be used to import the .csv files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recommendations.MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

process operations | process operations | control strategies | control strategies | feedback | feedback | feedforward | feedforward | control structures | control structures | model-based control | model-based control | process equipment | process equipment

License

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17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT) 17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT)

Description

This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the

Subjects

terrorism | terrorism | non-state actors | non-state actors | state-sponsored terrorism | state-sponsored terrorism | suicide terrorism | suicide terrorism | militias | militias | warlords | warlords | terrorists | terrorists | insurgents | insurgents | terror networks | terror networks | political violence | political violence | collective action | collective action | terrorist strategies | terrorist strategies | Mujahideen | Mujahideen | jihad | jihad | hamas | hamas | al-Qaida | al-Qaida | Hezbollah | Hezbollah | counterterrorism | counterterrorism

License

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17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT) 17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT)

Description

This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development? This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development?

Subjects

poverty | poverty | theoretical and empirical approaches | theoretical and empirical approaches | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | the politics of industrial policy and planning | the politics of industrial policy and planning | relationship between institutional change and growth | relationship between institutional change and growth | social consequences for alternative strategies of development | social consequences for alternative strategies of development

License

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12.000 Solving Complex Problems (MIT) 12.000 Solving Complex Problems (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. Solving Complex Problems provides an opportunity for entering freshmen to gain first-hand experience with working as part of a team to develop effective approaches to complex problems in Earth system science and engineering that do not have straightforward solutions. The subject includes training in a variety of skills, ranging from library research to Web Design. Each year's course explores a different problem in detail through the study of complimentary case histories and the development of creative solution strategies. Beginning in 2000 as an educational experiment sponsored by MIT's Committee on the Undergraduate Program, and receiving major financial support from the Alex and Britt d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. Solving Complex Problems provides an opportunity for entering freshmen to gain first-hand experience with working as part of a team to develop effective approaches to complex problems in Earth system science and engineering that do not have straightforward solutions. The subject includes training in a variety of skills, ranging from library research to Web Design. Each year's course explores a different problem in detail through the study of complimentary case histories and the development of creative solution strategies. Beginning in 2000 as an educational experiment sponsored by MIT's Committee on the Undergraduate Program, and receiving major financial support from the Alex and Britt d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in

Subjects

small teams | small teams | effective solutions | effective solutions | complex problems | complex problems | Earth system science and engineering | Earth system science and engineering | complementary case histories | complementary case histories | creative solution strategies | creative solution strategies | Web site development | Web site development | effective written and oral communication | effective written and oral communication | team building | team building

License

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2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT) 2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT)

Description

The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly automation. Clas The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly automation. Clas

Subjects

mechanical assembly | mechanical assembly | product development | product development | assembly automation | assembly automation | rigid part mating | rigid part mating | compliant part mating | compliant part mating | remote center compliance | remote center compliance | product architecture | product architecture | feature-based design | feature-based design | assembly sequence analysis | assembly sequence analysis | mechanical constraint analysis | mechanical constraint analysis | tolerances | tolerances | system-level design for assembly | system-level design for assembly | JIT methods | JIT methods | economics of assembly automation | economics of assembly automation | mass customization | mass customization | management of variety | management of variety | product family strategies | product family strategies

License

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5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT) 5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT)

Description

This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules. This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | crystal structure refinement | crystal structure refinement | practical aspects | practical aspects | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | data collection | data collection | strategies | strategies | data reduction | data reduction | refinement problems | refinement problems | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | molecules | molecules | SHELXL | SHELXL | hydrogen atoms | hydrogen atoms | disorder | disorder | pseudo symmetry | pseudo symmetry | merohedral twins | merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | twinning | twinning | non-merohedral twins | non-merohedral twins | PLATON | PLATON

License

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5.37 Introduction to Organic Synthesis Laboratory (MIT) 5.37 Introduction to Organic Synthesis Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course, which spans a third of a semester, provides students with experience using techniques employed in synthetic organic chemistry. It also introduces them to the exciting research area of catalytic chiral catalysis. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. This course, which spans a third of a semester, provides students with experience using techniques employed in synthetic organic chemistry. It also introduces them to the exciting research area of catalytic chiral catalysis. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format.

Subjects

experiment | experiment | laboratory | laboratory | organic | organic | synthesis | synthesis | chemistry | chemistry | diels-alder | diels-alder | catalysis | catalysis | asymmetric | asymmetric | cycloaddition | cycloaddition | enantioselectivity | enantioselectivity | diastereoselectivity | diastereoselectivity | chirality | chirality | chiral gas chromatography | chiral gas chromatography | stereochemistry | stereochemistry | convergent strategies | convergent strategies | retrosynthetic analysis | retrosynthetic analysis

License

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7.342 Chronic Infection and Inflammation: What are the Consequences on Your Health? (MIT) 7.342 Chronic Infection and Inflammation: What are the Consequences on Your Health? (MIT)

Description

In this course we will explore the new emerging field of pathogen-induced chronic diseases. Work in this field has redefined the causes of some major disorders, such as ulcers. By reading the primary research literature we will learn about the molecular mechanisms through which pathogens cause disease. The diseases that we cover will be introduced with a short patient case study. We will discuss the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and gastric disease, HPV and cervical cancer, hepatitis C virus and liver disease, Epstein-Barr virus and lymphoma, Cytomegalovirus and atherosclerosis, as well as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. We will study technical advances in the fight against microbes and explore future directions for new treatment strategies of chronic infections and inflammation. This cou In this course we will explore the new emerging field of pathogen-induced chronic diseases. Work in this field has redefined the causes of some major disorders, such as ulcers. By reading the primary research literature we will learn about the molecular mechanisms through which pathogens cause disease. The diseases that we cover will be introduced with a short patient case study. We will discuss the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and gastric disease, HPV and cervical cancer, hepatitis C virus and liver disease, Epstein-Barr virus and lymphoma, Cytomegalovirus and atherosclerosis, as well as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. We will study technical advances in the fight against microbes and explore future directions for new treatment strategies of chronic infections and inflammation. This cou

Subjects

Seminar | Seminar | literature review | literature review | cancer | cancer | vaccine | vaccine | antibiotic | antibiotic | chronic | chronic | atherosclerosis | atherosclerosis | diabetes | diabetes | human papilloma virus | human papilloma virus | HPV | HPV | helicobacter pylori | helicobacter pylori | epstein-barr | epstein-barr | treatment strategies | treatment strategies | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | lab | lab | herpes | herpes | microbes | microbes | infection | infection | health | health | Epstein-Barr | Epstein-Barr | cervical cancer | cervical cancer | cirrhosis | cirrhosis | multiple sclerosis | multiple sclerosis | hepatitis | hepatitis | hepatocellular carcinoma | hepatocellular carcinoma | gastric | gastric

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control (MIT) 10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control (MIT)

Description

This course introduces dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; and applications to process equipment. Dedication In preparing this material, the author has recalled with pleasure his own introduction, many years ago, to Process Control. This OCW course is dedicated with gratitude, to Prof. W. C. Clements of the University of Alabama. This course introduces dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; and applications to process equipment. Dedication In preparing this material, the author has recalled with pleasure his own introduction, many years ago, to Process Control. This OCW course is dedicated with gratitude, to Prof. W. C. Clements of the University of Alabama.

Subjects

process dynamics | process dynamics | control feedback | control feedback | cascade | cascade | tank | tank | series | series | operations | operations | chemical engineering | chemical engineering | controller | controller | valve | valve | transducer | transducer | feedforward | feedforward | differential equations | differential equations | LaPlace transform | LaPlace transform | exothermic | exothermic | reactor | reactor | control systems | control systems | control strategies | control strategies | control structures | control structures

License

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Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT) Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district. This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district.

Subjects

main streets | main streets | urban neighborhood decline | urban neighborhood decline | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | physical development tools | physical development tools | economic development tools | economic development tools | revitalization strategies | revitalization strategies | retail | retail | market analysis | market analysis | assets | assets | capacity assessment | capacity assessment | existing conditions analysis | existing conditions analysis | streetscapes | streetscapes | neighborhood image and identity | neighborhood image and identity | zoning | zoning | business development | business development | organization | organization | capacity building | capacity building | marketing | marketing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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