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7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT) 7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies. This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies.

Subjects

human disease | human disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of cancer | molecular basis of cancer | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of cancer | cellular basis of cancer | genetics of simple and complex traits | genetics of simple and complex traits | karyotypic analysis | karyotypic analysis | positional cloning | positional cloning | genetic diagnosis | genetic diagnosis | roles of oncogenes | roles of oncogenes | tumor suppressors | tumor suppressors | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | tumor progression | tumor progression | tumor treatment | tumor treatment | interaction between genetics and environment | interaction between genetics and environment | animal models of human disease | animal models of human disease | cancer | cancer | conventional treatment strategies | conventional treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.369 Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development (MIT) 15.369 Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development (MIT)

Description

This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers. This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers.

Subjects

new product development | new product development | internal venturing | internal venturing | corporate venture capital | corporate venture capital | Collaborative technology acquisition | Collaborative technology acquisition | venture creation | venture creation | internal venture strategies | internal venture strategies | external venture strategies | external venture strategies | internal entrepreneurship | internal entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT) 15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality. This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | strategy games | strategy games | strategic thinking | strategic thinking | business strategy | business strategy | strategic reasoning | strategic reasoning | rationality | rationality | dominant strategies | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | entering new markets | new market entry | new market entry | brinksmanship | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiation | negotiating | negotiating | auctions | auctions | auction theory | auction theory | revenue equivalence | revenue equivalence | bidding | bidding | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | risk manipulation | adverse selection | adverse selection | moral hazard | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT) 17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics. This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | security | sustainability | sustainability | international relations | international relations | comparative approaches | comparative approaches | constraints | constraints | options | options | strategies | strategies | policy choice | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | developing and industrial nations | decision | decision | trade-offs | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | inter-temporal effects | technology | technology | design systems | design systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT) 2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT)

Description

The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly automation. Clas The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly automation. Clas

Subjects

mechanical assembly | mechanical assembly | product development | product development | assembly automation | assembly automation | rigid part mating | rigid part mating | compliant part mating | compliant part mating | remote center compliance | remote center compliance | product architecture | product architecture | feature-based design | feature-based design | assembly sequence analysis | assembly sequence analysis | mechanical constraint analysis | mechanical constraint analysis | tolerances | tolerances | system-level design for assembly | system-level design for assembly | JIT methods | JIT methods | economics of assembly automation | economics of assembly automation | mass customization | mass customization | management of variety | management of variety | product family strategies | product family strategies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Chronic Infection and Inflammation: What are the Consequences on Your Health? (MIT) 7.342 Chronic Infection and Inflammation: What are the Consequences on Your Health? (MIT)

Description

In this course we will explore the new emerging field of pathogen-induced chronic diseases. Work in this field has redefined the causes of some major disorders, such as ulcers. By reading the primary research literature we will learn about the molecular mechanisms through which pathogens cause disease. The diseases that we cover will be introduced with a short patient case study. We will discuss the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and gastric disease, HPV and cervical cancer, hepatitis C virus and liver disease, Epstein-Barr virus and lymphoma, Cytomegalovirus and atherosclerosis, as well as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. We will study technical advances in the fight against microbes and explore future directions for new treatment strategies of chronic infections and inflammation. This cou In this course we will explore the new emerging field of pathogen-induced chronic diseases. Work in this field has redefined the causes of some major disorders, such as ulcers. By reading the primary research literature we will learn about the molecular mechanisms through which pathogens cause disease. The diseases that we cover will be introduced with a short patient case study. We will discuss the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and gastric disease, HPV and cervical cancer, hepatitis C virus and liver disease, Epstein-Barr virus and lymphoma, Cytomegalovirus and atherosclerosis, as well as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. We will study technical advances in the fight against microbes and explore future directions for new treatment strategies of chronic infections and inflammation. This cou

Subjects

Seminar | Seminar | literature review | literature review | cancer | cancer | vaccine | vaccine | antibiotic | antibiotic | chronic | chronic | atherosclerosis | atherosclerosis | diabetes | diabetes | human papilloma virus | human papilloma virus | HPV | HPV | helicobacter pylori | helicobacter pylori | epstein-barr | epstein-barr | treatment strategies | treatment strategies | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | lab | lab | herpes | herpes | microbes | microbes | infection | infection | health | health | Epstein-Barr | Epstein-Barr | cervical cancer | cervical cancer | cirrhosis | cirrhosis | multiple sclerosis | multiple sclerosis | hepatitis | hepatitis | hepatocellular carcinoma | hepatocellular carcinoma | gastric | gastric

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.559 Comparative Security and Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the complexities associated with security and sustainability of states in international relations. Covering aspects of theory, methods and empirical analysis, the course is in three parts, and each consists of seminar sessions focusing on specific topics.

Subjects

security; sustainability; international relations; comparative approaches; constraints; options; strategies; policy choice; developing and industrial nations; decision; trade-offs; inter-temporal effects; technology; design systems; | security | sustainability | international relations | comparative approaches | constraints | options | strategies | policy choice | developing and industrial nations | decision | trade-offs | inter-temporal effects | technology | design systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.369 Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology-Based New Business Development (MIT)

Description

This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers.

Subjects

new product development | internal venturing | corporate venture capital | Collaborative technology acquisition | venture creation | internal venture strategies | external venture strategies | internal entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT) 5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT)

Description

This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules. This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | crystal structure refinement | crystal structure refinement | practical aspects | practical aspects | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | data collection | data collection | strategies | strategies | data reduction | data reduction | refinement problems | refinement problems | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | molecules | molecules | SHELXL | SHELXL | hydrogen atoms | hydrogen atoms | disorder | disorder | pseudo symmetry | pseudo symmetry | merohedral twins | merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | twinning | twinning | non-merohedral twins | non-merohedral twins | PLATON | PLATON

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A deep breath in

Description

Asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are common conditions that affect the lives of many people. Dr Mona Bafadhel studies the pathophysiology of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). There are broadly two inflammatory phenotypes of COPD that are clinically indistinguishable but have different treatment responses. Dr Bafadhel is working on the development of novel therapeutic strategies for COPD, particularly to treat the regular periods of worsened symptoms that patients experience. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

asthma | copd | pathophysiology | treatment | therapeutic strategies | asthma | copd | pathophysiology | treatment | therapeutic strategies

License

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A deep breath in

Description

Asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are common conditions that affect the lives of many people. Dr Mona Bafadhel studies the pathophysiology of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). There are broadly two inflammatory phenotypes of COPD that are clinically indistinguishable but have different treatment responses. Dr Bafadhel is working on the development of novel therapeutic strategies for COPD, particularly to treat the regular periods of worsened symptoms that patients experience. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

asthma | copd | pathophysiology | treatment | therapeutic strategies | asthma | copd | pathophysiology | treatment | therapeutic strategies

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.927J The Economic History of Work and Family (MIT) 21H.927J The Economic History of Work and Family (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond

Subjects

21H.927 | 21H.927 | WGS.610 | WGS.610 | History | History | economics | economics | work | work | family | family | women | women | men | men | pre-industrial | pre-industrial | modern | modern | societies | societies | public | public | private | private | household | household | work spaces | work spaces | map | map | consumption | consumption | goods | goods | leisure | leisure | reproductive strategies | reproductive strategies | domestic | domestic | policy | policy | work force | work force | demographic | demographic | western Europe | western Europe | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | United States | United States | non-western cultures | non-western cultures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel (MIT)

Description

The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works. The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works.

Subjects

American novel | American novel | democracy | slavery | democracy | slavery | democracy | democracy | slavery | slavery | gender equity | gender equity | social reform | social reform | literary strategies | literary strategies | William Blake | William Blake | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | William Faulkner | William Faulkner | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.15J Networks (MIT) 14.15J Networks (MIT)

Description

Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a

Subjects

networks | networks | crowds | crowds | markets | markets | highly connected world | highly connected world | social networks | social networks | economic networks | economic networks | power networks | power networks | communication networks | communication networks | game theory | game theory | graph theory | graph theory | branching processes | branching processes | random graph models | random graph models | rich get richer phenomena | rich get richer phenomena | power laws | power laws | small worlds | small worlds | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | degree distributions | degree distributions | phase transitions | phase transitions | connectedness | connectedness | and giant component | and giant component | link analysis | link analysis | web search | web search | navigation | navigation | decentralized search | decentralized search | preferential attachment | preferential attachment | epidemics | epidemics | diffusion through networks | diffusion through networks | SIR | SIR | (susceptible | (susceptible | infected | infected | removed) | removed) | SIS | SIS | susceptible) | susceptible) | strategies | strategies | payoffs | payoffs | normal forms | normal forms | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | traffic networks | traffic networks | negative externalities | negative externalities | Braess' paradox | Braess' paradox | potential games | potential games | myopic behavior | myopic behavior | fictitious play | fictitious play | repeated games | repeated games | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | cooperation | cooperation | perfect information | perfect information | imperfect information | imperfect information | positive externalities | positive externalities | strategic complements | strategic complements | path dependence | path dependence | diffusion of innovation | diffusion of innovation | contagion pheonomena | contagion pheonomena | Bayes's rule | Bayes's rule | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | first price auctions | first price auctions | second price auctions | second price auctions | social learning | social learning | Bayesian learning | Bayesian learning | copying | copying | herding | herding | herd behavior | herd behavior | informational cascades | informational cascades | decisions | decisions | social choice | social choice | Condorcet jury theorem | Condorcet jury theorem | political economy | political economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | defense | policy | institutional relationships | military | forces | civil | government | industry | science | military relations | politicians | defense contractors | officers | strategies | bureaucracy | armed services | contractors | defense scientists | sociology | organization | politics | political economy | congress | president | terror | war | homeland | intraservice | interservice | cargo | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT) 15.902 Strategic Management I (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies. This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies.

Subjects

strategic management | strategic management | delta project | delta project | corporate | corporate | business | business | functional strategies | functional strategies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT) 21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the ways in which we read. It introduces some important strategies for engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century, paying special attention to poststructuralist theories and their legacy. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In general, we will: (1) work through the selected readings in order to see how they construe what literary interpretation is; (2) locate the limits of each particular approach; and (3) trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to what came before. This subject examines the ways in which we read. It introduces some important strategies for engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century, paying special attention to poststructuralist theories and their legacy. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In general, we will: (1) work through the selected readings in order to see how they construe what literary interpretation is; (2) locate the limits of each particular approach; and (3) trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to what came before.

Subjects

literary theory | literary theory | strategies of reading | strategies of reading | literary texts developed in the twentieth century | literary texts developed in the twentieth century | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | interpretative approach | interpretative approach | film | film | literature | literature | freud | freud | philosophy | philosophy | sophocles | sophocles | bronte | bronte | foucault | foucault | structuralism | structuralism | deconstruction | deconstruction | psychoanalysis | psychoanalysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT) 2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT)

Description

The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly

Subjects

mechanical assembly | | mechanical assembly | | product development | | product development | | assembly automation | | assembly automation | | rigid part mating | | rigid part mating | | compliant part mating | | compliant part mating | | remote center compliance | | remote center compliance | | product architecture | | product architecture | | feature-based design | | feature-based design | | assembly sequence analysis | | assembly sequence analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | tolerances | | tolerances | | system-level design for assembly | | system-level design for assembly | | JIT methods | | JIT methods | | economics of assembly automation | | economics of assembly automation | | mass customization | | mass customization | | management of variety | | management of variety | | product family strategies | product family strategies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT) 5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement (MIT)

Description

This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules. This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | crystal structure refinement | crystal structure refinement | practical aspects | practical aspects | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | data collection | data collection | strategies | strategies | data reduction | data reduction | refinement problems | refinement problems | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | molecules | molecules | SHELXL | SHELXL | hydrogen atoms | hydrogen atoms | disorder | disorder | pseudo symmetry | pseudo symmetry | merohedral twins | merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | pseudo-merohedral twins | twinning | twinning | non-merohedral twins | non-merohedral twins | PLATON | PLATON

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.37 Introduction to Organic Synthesis Laboratory (MIT) 5.37 Introduction to Organic Synthesis Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course, which spans a third of a semester, provides students with experience using techniques employed in synthetic organic chemistry. It also introduces them to the exciting research area of catalytic chiral catalysis. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. This course, which spans a third of a semester, provides students with experience using techniques employed in synthetic organic chemistry. It also introduces them to the exciting research area of catalytic chiral catalysis. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format.

Subjects

experiment | experiment | laboratory | laboratory | organic | organic | synthesis | synthesis | chemistry | chemistry | diels-alder | diels-alder | catalysis | catalysis | asymmetric | asymmetric | cycloaddition | cycloaddition | enantioselectivity | enantioselectivity | diastereoselectivity | diastereoselectivity | chirality | chirality | chiral gas chromatography | chiral gas chromatography | stereochemistry | stereochemistry | convergent strategies | convergent strategies | retrosynthetic analysis | retrosynthetic analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | strategy games | strategic thinking | business strategy | strategic reasoning | rationality | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | new market entry | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiating | auctions | auction theory | revenue equivalence | bidding | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | adverse selection | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Modelling Excellence (7/10): Discovering strategies

Description

Using strategies to model excellence and in coaching

Subjects

ukoer | lfwoer | learning from woerk | uopcpdlm | continuous professional development | cpd | work-based learning | wbl | learning | development | strategy | coaching | modelling | modelling excellence | excellence | strategies | changing strategies | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT) 15.281 Advanced Managerial Communication (MIT)

Description

This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms. This course builds on managerial communication skills developed in Management Communication for Undergraduates (15.279) or Communication for Managers (15.280). It introduces interactive oral and interpersonal communication skills important to managers, including: presenting to a hostile audience, running meetings, listening, and contributing to group decision-making. Working in teams, students present a communication topic of their choosing to the class. An individual project challenges students to address a business audience in written and oral forms.

Subjects

interpersonal communication | interpersonal communication | business presentations | business presentations | communication strategies | communication strategies | teamwork | teamwork | running meetings | running meetings | managerial communication | managerial communication | business writing | business writing | business speaking | business speaking | group decision making | group decision making | hostile audience | hostile audience | role play exercises | role play exercises | persuasive communication | persuasive communication | persuading audiences | persuading audiences | listening | listening | nonverbal communication | nonverbal communication | A | A | question and answer | question and answer | working with media | working with media | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | communicating across cultures | communicating across cultures | cross-cultural communication | cross-cultural communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Modelling Excellence (8/10): Typical strategies (1)

Description

Using strategies to model excellence and in coaching

Subjects

ukoer | lfwoer | learning from woerk | uopcpdlm | continuous professional development | cpd | work-based learning | wbl | learning | development | strategy | coaching | modelling | modelling excellence | excellence | strategies | changing strategies | administrative studies | N000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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