Searching for streetlifeinlondon : 36 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

The Independent Shoe-Black

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?The independent boot-black whose photograph is before the reader, found by experience that the system instituted was not altogether pleasant. He has served in two brigades, the "blues" and the "reds," and found them both equally objectionable; so, at last, he gave up the uniform and became an independent boot-black. In this capacity, though free, he experienced all the persecutions to which I have alluded, and as he grew older and more tired of this life, he finally resolved to leave the narrow streets for the broader thoroughfares of the ocean. As a sailor, he promises to become a useful help to his captain and ship. His mother has to nurse an invalid husband, and must also provide for a large family. Under these circumstances, it was not always easy for her to spare the services of her son. But when he became an independent boot-black, he could go out at his own hours, and thus was of greater use to his mother in her trouble; and it was a great help to the family to know that whenever the boy had a few moments to spare, he might run out and hope to gain some pence by cleaning gentlemen's boots.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | shoeblack | shoeshineboy | bootblack | childworker | shoeshine | london | streetphotography

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Old Furniture

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "At the corner of Church Lane, Holborn, there was a second-hand furniture dealer, whose business was a cross between that of a shop and a street stall. The dealer was never satisfied unless the weather allowed him to disgorge nearly the whole of his stock into the middle of the street, a method which alone secured the approval and custom of his neighbours. As a matter of fact, the inhabitants of Church Lane were nearly all what I may term ?street folks? ? living, buying, selling, transacting all their business in the open street. It was a celebrated resort for tramps and costers of every description." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | london | holborn | shop | streetstall | streetsellers | furniture | chair | chairs | churchlane | streetphotography | conversation | emptychair | birdcage | coathooks | books

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Flying Dustmen

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "The removal of dust and refuse from the houses of the metropolis is a task which devolves on the officers of the various parishes. Although the duty of collecting dust is not always discharged to the satisfaction of householders, it must be admitted, when the gigantic nature of the work is taken into account, that there is very little ground for complaint. In the parish of Lambeth alone there are about 40,000 rateable houses. Each house is calculated to contribute on an average three loads of dust in the course of the year, so that the accumulated annual refuse of this section of London would form a mound of no mean proportions. In this parish matters are so arranged that a dust-cart is supposed to pass each door twice a week. The faithful observance of this and other rules depends jointly on the men themselves, and on the efficient supervision of foremen set over them. These foremen are in the pay of the vestry, while the men and carts are hired by the day from a contractor. The rubbish thus collected is carted away in part to "shoots" found by the vestry within the area of the parish, and in part to the Thames, where it is deposited in boats hired for its removal at one pound sterling per load." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | london | dustmen | binmen | cart | horse | animal

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Sellers of Shell-fish

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ??But it's hard to pick up money on the streets; there is so many at the same game now, that it's about all we can do to get food. Fridays and Saturdays we stands a better chance of extra custom. Fish on Fridays goes down with the Irish, and on Saturday nights we get often a better class of customers than on other days. The workmen and their wives and sweethearts are about then, and hardly know how to spend their money fast enough. After visiting the public-houses they finish up with a fish supper of the very finest sort. Although I say it, no finer can be got, not at Greenwich or anywhere else. I've got to know exactly what I am about, and always to keep things going on the barrow in a style that brings folks back again. It's no use for a man always on the same pitch going in for the cheap and-nasty; he couldn't stand a day against the competition of his neighbours. I never pick out anything that looks the least thing gone, for fear of losing the run of trade. When it's possible to work off some doubtful goods is at night, at the bar of a public house, when the men drinking are too far gone to be nice about smell or taste, so long as they gets something strong. But even that is a dangerous game to be tried on too often, so I for my part leaves it alone."? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | fishmonger | fishseller | streettrade | streetsellers | fish | cart | stall | london | oysters | whelks | eels | streetphotography | market | streetfood

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Street Locksmith

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?The owner of the stall in the accompanying photograph had, however, a different story to tell concerning keys. He possessed some keys which he would gladly sell for twopence, and he reminded me that this branch of his business was subject to certain restrictions which made him at times "lose a job or two." If keys were sold and made indiscriminately, burglars, and in fact all thieves would find easy access to other people's property. Hence certain laws were enacted with the object of preventing anyone buying keys save the rightful owners of the locks they were intended to fit. A locksmith is, therefore, not allowed to make a key from an impression. Either the lock itself must be brought to him, or the locksmith must be allowed to enter the premises and fit his key into the door. Otherwise it would suffice to obtain an impression of a key on a piece of soap or wax for a thief to procure himself a similar one, and thus open the lock protecting the coveted treasure. Further, it is illegal for a locksmith to lend a bunch of his keys; and, in a word, before exercising his art to open locks he must assure himself that his services are not required for any dishonest purpose.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | locksmith | locksmiths | keys | streetvendors | streettrade | whitechapelroad | londres | sigloxix | llaves | niños | trabajoinfantil | herreros

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Italian Street Musicians

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "Then there is something irresistible in the bright glitter of his eyes, in. his cheerful gait, and his fascinating manners; While English mendicant is coarse, ungainly, dirty, rude of speech, unartist-like in his appearance, out of tune when he sings, vulgar in all his deeds, and often bears the stamp of a hopeless drunkard. This perhaps explains how it is that Italians, sons of peasants, agricultural labourers, and others who might lead respectable lives in their own country, prefer to come over to England where they are sometimes treated as mere beggars. They find that a beggar in England is richer than a labourer in Italy; and if he be not equally prosperous it is because he is not equally abstemious and economical. The Italian, therefore, migrates with the knowledge that he may rely on the generosity of the English, and that, if he only receives as much as many of the English poor, he may hope to save enough to buy himself a farm in his own country. They arrive, therefore, in shoals, and seeing how their presence is appreciated, do not realize the somewhat humiliating character of their avocation. Many, on the contrary, proudly claim a right to be ranked above the mendicant class. They urge, and to a certain extent justl y, that they are of use to the community; that, as a rule, their performance, whether with the barrel-organ, the piano-organ, the harp, fiddle, or other instrument, gratifies the majority of their hearers, and propagates the love for music among the poor. The only difference, so far as the political economy of the case is concerned, between them and actors and professional singers is the fact that they impose themselves on the public by performing in the street, and have to solicit, cap in hand, their reward. Otherwise, they argue, that they simply cater for the public amusement; that if their performance is of a very inferior character to what may be heard in concert-rooms or theatres, they consequently receive very inferior pay. This is in fact but a mere question of supply and demand." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | musicians | harp | streetlifeinlondon | streetperformers | italian | italians | italianialondra

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Crawlers

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?But old age, and want of proper food and rest, reduces them to a lethargic condition which can scarcely be preferable to death itself. It will be noticed that they are constantly dozing, and yet are never really asleep. Some of them are unable to lie down for days. They sit on the hard stone step of the workhouse, their heads reclining on the door, and here by old custom they are left undisturbed. Indeed, the policeman of this beat displays, I am told, much commiseration for these poor refugees, and in no way molests them. When it rains, the door offers a little shelter if the wind is in a favourable direction, but as a rule the women are soon drenched, and consequently experience all the tortures of ague and rheumatism in addition to their other ailments. Under such circumstances sound sleep is an unknown luxury, hence that drowsiness from which they are never thoroughly exempt. This peculiarity has earned them the nick-name of" dosses," derived from the verb to doze, by which they are sometimes recognized. The crawlers may truly be described as persons who sleep ?with one eye open.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | crawler | workhouse | shortsgardens | stgiles | london | oldlady | oldwoman | homeless | woman | baby | doorway | ageing

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"Hookey Alf" of Whitechapel

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?Thus in the photograph before us we have the calm undisturbed face of the skilled artisan, who has spent a life of tranquil, useful labour, and can enjoy his pipe in peace, while under him sits a woman whose painful expression seems to indicate a troubled existence, and a past which even drink cannot obliterate. By her side, a brawny, healthy "woman of the people," is not to be disturbed from her enjoyment of a "drop of beer" by domestic cares; and early acclimatizes her infant to the fumes of tobacco and alcohol. But in the fore-ground the camera has chronicled the most touching episode. A little girl, not too young, however, to ignore the fatal consequences of drink, has penetrated boldly into the group, as if about to reclaim some relation in danger, and drag him away from evil companionship. There is no sight to be seen in the streets of London more pathetic than this oft-repeated story the little child leading home a drunken parent. Well may those little faces early bear the stamp of the anxiety that destroys their youthfulness, and saddens all who have the heart to study such scenes. Inured to a life crowded with episodes of this description, the pot-boy stands in the back-ground with immoveable countenance, while at his side a well-to-do tradesman has an expression of sleek contentment, which renders him superior to the misery around.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | whitechapel | london | whitechapelroad | pub | publichouse | hookeyalf | tedcoally | eastend

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

November Effigies

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "The accompanying photograph is that of a nondescript guy, somewhat clumsily built up by a costermonger who lives in the south-east of London. This meaningless monstrosity, together with the absurd appearance of the man in woman's clothes, amuses some persons, and the conductor of such an exhibition can hope to realize about thirty shillings the first day, a pound on the 6th of November, and ten or fifteen shillings on the 7th. With this money the cost of getting up the guy must be refunded, and a shilling or eighteen pence per day given to the boys who help to swell the cortege. The boys' share of the proceeds is consequently somewhat out of proportion with the time and cheers they devote to promoting the success of the enterprise; but it is argued that they enjoy the fun, while to their seniors the venture is attended with some risk, and is only considered as another form of labour for daily bread." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | november5th | guyfawkes | effigy | effigies | cart | donkey | crossdressing | guyfawkesnight | fireworknight | bonfirenight | london | streetperformance

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"Mush-Fakers" and Ginger-Beer Makers

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?At Clapham Common - where the accompanying photograph was taken - Hampstead, Greenwich, Battersea Park, etc etc, on a broiling summer's day, there is a great demand for light, refreshing drinks, and more than £ I may be taken during one day by those who have a sufficient supply of ginger-beer with them, or some friend who can bring a fresh stock in the course of the afternoon. In ordinary times, however, twenty shillings a week net profit is considered a very fair reward for selling ginger-beer in the streets. Apart from the very hot days, and the pleasure-g rounds around the metropolis, the best time and place for the sale is near the closed public-houses on a Sunday morning. The enormous number of persons who have spent their Saturday evening and wages in getting lamentably drunk, come out in the morning ?with their throats parched and are glad of anything that will relieve the retributive thirst from which they suffer. Ginger-beer, under these circumstances, is particularly effective in restoring tone and mitigating the consequences of intemperance; and these are facts which readily account for the large sales effected on Sunday mornings.? [?] ?The real "mush-fakers" are men who not only sell, but can mend and make umbrellas. Wandering from street to street, with a bundle of old umbrellas and a few necessary tools under their arm, they inquire for umbrellas to mend from house to house. When their services are accepted, they have two objects in view. First, having obtained an umbrella to mend, they prefer sitting out doing the work in the street, in front of the house. This attracts the attention of the neighbours, and the fact that they have been entrusted with work by the inhabitants of one house generally brings more custom from those who live next door. When the job is terminated, the ?mush-faker " looks about him, as he enters the house, in quest of an umbrella which has passed the mending stage ; and, in exchange for the same, offers to make a slight reduction in his charge. Thus he gradually obtains a stock of very old umbrellas, and by taking the good bits from one old "mushroom? and adding it to another, he is able to make, out of two broken and torn umbrellas, a tolerably stout and serviceable gingham. For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | claphamcommon | london | seasonaltrade | gingerbeer | outdoorvendors | drinks | umbrellas | mushfakers | streetsellers

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Water-Cart

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?The men employed on the water carts work according to the state of the weather. Thus, in summer under a hot dry wind, they emerge at early morning from the vestry yards and radiate over the parishes. During wet weather some are employed in cleansing the roads, others in carting materials for the contractors who supply the building trade. These are the hands who find constant employment under one master at weekly wages ranging from eighteen to twenty-three shillings. In justice to the contractors, I must express my admiration of the carts, men, and horses used in this branch of road labour. ?The accompanying illustration is a fair specimen of the modern water-cart and its accessories. The cart is, I believe, protected by a patent, and is assuredly of the most novel construction. The horse is typical of the class of animal used for the work - large and powerful, so as to stand the strain of incessant journeyings two and fro, and of the weight of water in the tank. The man is a fair type of his class, being attired in a manner peculiar to watering-men. Beyond the ability to groom and manage a well-fed docile horse, nothing approaching skilled labour is required. He sits on his perch all day long, only descending when it is necessary to refill his cart at the hydrants.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | watercart | horse | streetcleaners | cart | london | road

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

London Boardmen

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?I had, for instance, an occasion of discussing with two boardmen who seemed worthy of a better position. The first had been trained as a smith, and engaged in the making of iron bedsteads. Now, however, smiths are no longer employed for this sort of work. It has been found more expedient and economical to make bedsteads with cast iron, and this change in the mode of manufacture threw many men out of employment, and notably my informant, who gradually sank to that state of misery when street life becomes the only means of existence. The other board man with whom I conversed was an old soldier, and had served nine years in the East Indies. He had shared in many glorious engagements, and was proud to relate that he had fought in Major-General Havelock's division at the relief of Lucknow. Probably his position in life would have been secured had he only received a good education; but he was not well enough read to occupy the post or undertake the business his friends were willing to offer him. He consequently dwindled down till he reached that point in life when anything that brings a few pence is heartily welcome. But the old soldier has still retained considerable energy. He is not content with carrying the boards during the day, but also seeks to make use of his evenings. He has, fortunately, often obtained a shilling a night at the Globe Theatre where he appeared as a supernumerary.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | boardman | boardmen | advertising | sandwichboard

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

?Strawberries. All ripe! All ripe!? - The Street Fruit Trade

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "The season for strawberries, the most delicious of English fruits, has ended. This delicacy was brought in numberless barrow- loads to the doors of the poorest inhabitants of London. The familiar cry, " Fine strawberries. All ripe! all ripe! " is silenced for a season by sounds less welcome. The fragrance of the ripe fruit wafted by the summer breeze from the coster's cart as it passed through the alleys, is replaced by less grateful odours - by the normal atmosphere of over crowded neighbourhoods, by the autumn taint of animal and vegetable decay, which invests the low-lying districts of London." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | fruitsellers | streettraders | strawberries

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Workers on the "Silent Highway"

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "There are, undoubtedly, many most honest, hard-working, and in every sense worthy men, who hold licences from the Watermen's Company, or from the Thames Conservancy. That these men are rough and but poorly educated is a natural consequence of their calling. N ever stationary in anyone place, it is difficult for them to secure education for their children, and regular attendance at school would be impossible unless the child left its parents altogether. Thus there is an enormous percentage of men who cannot read at all. Their domestic arrangements are, however, better than the canal bargemen. . Cramped up in little cabins, the scenes of over-crowding enacted on board canal barges, equal and even exceed in their horrors what occurs in the worse rookeries of London. Fortunately, the very nature of their occupation compels the men to enjoy plenty of fresh air and invigorating exercise, and this naturally counteracts the evil effects resulting from their occasional confinement in cabins unfit for human habitation." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | thames | river | london | watermenscompany | thamesconservancy | canal | barge | bargemen | watermen

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cast-Iron Billy

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ??Forty-three years on the road, and more," said Cast-iron Billy; ?and, but for my ?rheumatics? I feel almost as 'ale and 'earty as any gentleman could wish. But I?m lost, I?ve been put off my perch. I don't mind telling of you I?m not so ?andy wi' the ribbons as in my younger days I was. Twice in my life I?ve been put off, and this finishes me. I'll never hold the whip again that's been in my hand these three and forty year, never! I can't sit at 'ome, my perch up there was more 'ome to me than 'anythink.' Havin' lost that I'm no good to nobody; a fish out o? water I be." [?] ?The subject of the photograph lost his position as driver owing to his inability to cope with younger men driving opposition omnibuses along the same route. In this instance the omnibuses crossed each other, the younger and more active man so taking the lead as to pick up all the passengers. This was not all, our veteran had become so enfeebled as to require help to mount his perch, while the reins had to be secured to his coat, as he has partially lost the use of his left hand.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | omnibus | bus | omnibusdriver | busdriver | publictransport | williamparragreen | castironbilly | 1877 | london | weststrand | hat | street

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Cheap Fish of St-Giles

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "Awaiting the moment when the costermonger is able to procure a barrow of his own he must pay eighteen pence per week for the cost of hiring. Then he must beware of the police, who have a knack of confiscating these barrows, on the pretext that they obstruct the thoroughfare and of placing them in what is termed the Green Yard, where no less than a shilling per day is charged for the room the barrow is supposed to occupy. At the same time, its owner will probably be fined from half a crown to ten shillings so that altogether it is much safer to secure a good place in a crowded street market. In this respect, Joseph Carney, the costermonger, whose portrait is before the reader, has been most fortunate. He stands regularly in the street market that stretches between Seven Dials and what is called Five Dials, making his pitch by a well-known newsagent's, whose shop serves as a landmark. Like the majority of his class, he does not always sell fish, but only when the wind is propitious and it can be bought cheaply. On the day when the photograph was taken, he had succeeded in buying a barrel of five hundred fresh herrings for twenty five shillings. Out of these he selected about two hundred of the largest fish, which he sold at a penny each, while he disposed of the smaller herrings at a halfpenny. "Trade was brisk at that moment, though the fish is sometimes much cheaper. Indeed, I have seen fresh herrings sold at five a penny; and this is all the more fortunate, as notwithstanding the small cost, they are, with the exception of good salmon, about the most nutritious fish in the market." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | fishmonger | stgiles | costermonger | sevendials | josephcarney | streetmarket | london | herrings

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Black Jack

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "Jack stood charged with cutting and wounding the donkeys with a heavy flail-like instrument. At the request of the magistrate the instrument was put in as evidence. It was produced by the defendant from the depths of a side pocket, and proved to be a switch of about eighteen inches in length. "This is the flail, your honour," said I, ?and I own I use it for tickling Tom and Billy, my donkeys. They want no more to make 'em fly." The case was dismissed. Jack left the court with a clear conscience and an unblemished name among costers; for, although some of them may neglect their wives and families, it seems to be a point of honour with all to treat their donkeys with kindness. For the kindness bestowed the animal invariably shows its gratitude by perfect docility and willingness to bear the yoke imposed by its master. The donkeys fare like their own masters; a prosperous day will secure for them some dainty, or at least a feed without stint, of oats, beans, and hay, at a cost of eightpence or ninepence." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | blackjack | donkey | cart | coster | costermonger

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Halfpenny Ices

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. "Italian ice men constitute a distinct feature of London life, which, however, IS generally Ignored by the public at large, so far as It?s intimate details are concerned. we note in various quarters the ice-barrow surrounded by groups of eager and greedy children, but fail to realize what a vast and elaborate organization is necessary to provide this delicacy in all parts of London. Most parsons are aware that there is an Italian colony at Saffron Hill, but it is strange how few visitors ever penetrate this curious quarter? ?In little villainous-looking and dirty shops an enormous business is transacted in the sale of milk for the manufacture of halfpenny ices. This trade commences at about four in the morning. The men in varied and extraordinary desltabzlle pour into the streets, throng the milk-shops, drag their barrows out, and begin to mix and freeze the ices. Carlo Gatti has an ice depot close at hand, which opens at four in the morning, and here a motley crowd congregates with baskets, pieces of cloth, flannel, and various other contrivances for carrying away their daily supply of ice. Gradually the freezing process is terminated, and then the men, after dressing themselves in a comparatively-speaking decent manner, start off, one by one, to their respective destinations; It is a veritable exodus. The quarter, at first so noisy and full of bustle, is soon deserted, a few women only remaining to attend to the domestic affairs and to quarrel with their loquacious neighbours." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | icecream | saffronhill | italian | london | carlogatti | streetsellers

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Covent Garden Labourers

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. ??the accompanying photograph represents a group of labourers who are in the service of Mr. Dickson, the well-known florist. Their business is strictly limited to flowers, and they never touch either vegetables or fruits. Nevertheless I am informed that there are five hundred flower stalls at the wholesale flower market, and, at a rough computation, two thousand men are engaged to bring and grow stock for these stalls; while another two thousand men find employment in distributing the flowers to their various purchasers. Only a small proportion of these latter are seen at Covent Garden during the daytime; it is in the early morning that they congregate on this spot, and they are soon scattered again to all parts of the metropolis, laden with plants of every description.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | coventgarden | flowers | baskets | labourers | market

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Wall Worker

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. ??The" wall working" or fence working, described by Parker as a " fine property," is a system of cheap advertising. Where a portion of a wall or fence, near some public thoroughfare, can be rented or obtained gratuitously, it is covered with an array of boards, which are hung up in the morning and taken in at night. In this instance, the boards covered with thin bills are supplied to Cannon [seated on the right], who hangs them up in the morning and receives about a shilling weekly for each board. But the number of boards afford no clue to the income derived from this mode of advertising, as an indefinite number of dummies are displayed to fill up vacant spaces. The dummies are carefully selected; the advertisements they carry must be as imposing as the names of their owners are respectable. Cannon assured me that it required tact and experience to manage this sort of property. Unfortunately the dummies have been dominant of late, owing to depression in all departments of trade. The result is that the" wall worker's " property produces a return so poor as hardly to repay the pains bestowed on its management.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | advertising

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

A Convicts Home

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. "In Drury Lane there is a house which has been celebrated for more than a century. It was a "cook-shop" in Jack Sheppard?s time. This notorious criminal often dined there, and it is now still frequented by hungry convicts or ticket-of-leave men, who find kindly welcome and may, If they choose, receive wholesome advice from the owner of this strange establishment?" For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

balance | streetlifeinlondon | jacksheppard

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

An Old Clothes Shop, Seven Dials

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. "The accompanying photograph represents a second-hand clothes shop in a narrow thoroughfare of St. Giles, appropriately called Lumber Court, where. several similar tradesmen are grouped together, all dealing in old clothes and furniture of a most varied and dilapidated description. It is here that the poorest inhabitants of a district, renowned for its poverty, both buy and sell their clothes." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | sevendials | stgiles | lumbercourt | clothessellers | secondhand

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"Tickets" the Card-Dealer

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. This chapter tells of the life of a man nicknamed "Tickets": "About this time "Tickets" made the acquaintance of a Frenchman who possessed considerable skill as a sign-painter; and the two forthwith entered into partnership. The one paints, the other undertook to travel. "Tickets " is the traveller. From morning t ill night he wanders about, looking into the windows of small shops, till he discovers a ticket of dingy appearance, stained in colour, dog's eared, bent, and altogether disreputable. With eagle eye all these defects are discerned, and "Tickets" enters boldly into the shop, to press on the tradesman the advisability of purchasing a new ticket. He undertakes to supply a precise copy of the old and worn announcement on a better piece of cardboard, freshly painted, or, perhaps, more elaborately ornamented. [?] He hopes that the number of his customers will gradually increase, and that he will be able to save on his earnings. Then, like a true Frenchman, he will return to France, and purchase the goodwill of some small shop. In the meanwhile he observes the strictest economy. He never drinks. His bed costs him two shillings a week. His breakfast consists of cocoa and bread , and butter, the former being more nutritious than tea. For dinner he generally consumes a pennyworth of potatoes, with a herring or a haddock and a cup of tea, while his supper consists of bread and cheese to the value of twopence. I t is only on days of exceptional good fortune that he indulges in a little meat." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | advertising | signpainting | man | portrait

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Dramatic Shoe-Black

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. "Jacobus Parker, Dramatic Reader, Shoe-Black, and Peddler, is represented in the accompanying photograph standing at his accustomed pitch. Although the career of Parker has been clouded, and his life-story is one of struggle and disappointment, yet he has fought the battle bravely, and, as a veteran, is not without his scars. ?There is one thing I am proud of,? said Parker, one day; ?I am near three-score years and ten, have fought life's battle and won, and will carry with me to the end its chief prizes-a hale heart and a contented mind.? "Greed of gain, sir, has never been my motto. It is but a poor object to fill up every nook and cranny of a human heart from boyhood to old age, as it does with many." Again, in his own words, ?I have always advocated temperance and detested drunkenness. In my youth I never did apply hot and rebellious liquor to my blood, nor did, with unbashful forehead, woo the means of weakness and debility.' Ah, sir, I have seen wine make woeful wrecks of men and women too, recalling the powerful lines, ?Oh! thou invisible spirit of drink, if thou hast no other name to go by, let us call thee Devi1.'"" For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | jacobusparker | shoeshiner | peddler

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Temperance Sweep

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith. This chapter recounts the life story of John Day, which begins: 'Born in Lambeth, the son of a road-mender, John Day was sent out to work when scarcely more than ten years old. His father was decidedly addicted to drink, and was in the habit of taking his son on Sunday to public-houses, where drink was sold in defiance of the Licensing Act. So long as the child had a few halfpence for beer, he was in the parental eyes a good boy; but when his meagre earnings had been thus uselessly spent, his father came to the conclusion that he could not afford to keep him, and that it was high time the boy should fight his own way in the world. H e was therefore turned out of his home, and had to resort to the friendly, if cheerless shelter of railway arches; or at times he would sleep on a barge, and profited by the opportunity to wash his solitary shirt in the canal, and hang it up on the rigging of his temporary home, while he disported himself amidst the tarpaulin till it dried. At time when there was nothing to be done at the flour-mill, he obtained a little work as assistant to a neighbouring chimney-sweep; but in either employ he rarely made more than 3s.per week.' And ends: 'He is now the happy father of a large family, he lives in a house near Lambeth Walk, where he once humbly worked in the capacity of a mere assistant. As a master sweep he has an extensive connexion. The money he earns enables him to subscribe to several benefit societies, and he is entitled to receive from them 10s. a week in sickness, while his wife will have £46 given her at his death, or he will receive £18 should she die first. Altogether he is both prosperous and respected throughout the neighbourhood, where he ardently advocates the cause of total abstinence, and is well known as the temperance sweep.' For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | chimneysweep | johnday

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata