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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified Engineering | aerospace | CDIO | C-D-I-O | conceive | design | implement | operate | team | team-based | discipline | materials | structures | materials and structures | computers | programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | propulsion | signals | systems | signals and systems | systems problems | fundamentals | technical communication | graphical communication | communication | reading | research | experimentation | personal response system | prs | active learning | First law | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | work | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | energy exchange | processes | heat engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | flows | path-dependence | path-independence | reversibility | irreversibility | state | thermodynamic state | performance | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | cycles | thermal pressures | temperatures | linear static networks | loop method | node method | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | state methods | state concepts | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | sources | voltages | currents | Thevinin | Norton | initial value problems | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | transfer function | ada | ada programming | programming language | software systems | programming style | computer architecture | program language evolution | classification | numerical computation | number representation systems | assembly | SimpleSIM | RISC | CISC | operating systems | single user | multitasking | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | recursive | execution time | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | mach | reynolds | conservation | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | continuity | inviscid | steady flow | simple bodies | airfoils | wings | channels | aerodynamics | forces | moments | equilibrium | freebody diagram | free-body | free body | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | support reactions | reactions | static determinance | determinate systems | truss analysis | trusses | method of joints | method of sections | statically indeterminate | three great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | stress | extensional stress | shear stress | notation | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | mohr | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | strain | extensional strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | compatibility | strain transformation | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | classes of materials | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | atomic packing | crystals | crystal structures | polymers | estimate of moduli | moduli | composites | composite materials | modulus limited design | material selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | orthotropy | measurements | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | models | engineering systems | experiments | investigations | experimental error | design evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | effects of engineering | social context | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

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1.361 Advanced Soil Mechanics (MIT) 1.361 Advanced Soil Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This class presents the application of principles of soil mechanics. It considers the following topics: the origin and nature of soils; soil classification; the effective stress principle; hydraulic conductivity and seepage; stress-strain-strength behavior of cohesionless and cohesive soils and application to lateral earth stresses; bearing capacity and slope stability; consolidation theory and settlement analysis; and laboratory and field methods for evaluation of soil properties in design practice. This class presents the application of principles of soil mechanics. It considers the following topics: the origin and nature of soils; soil classification; the effective stress principle; hydraulic conductivity and seepage; stress-strain-strength behavior of cohesionless and cohesive soils and application to lateral earth stresses; bearing capacity and slope stability; consolidation theory and settlement analysis; and laboratory and field methods for evaluation of soil properties in design practice.

Subjects

soil | soil | origin and nature of soils | origin and nature of soils | soil classification | soil classification | effective stress principle | effective stress principle | hydraulic conductivity and seepage | hydraulic conductivity and seepage | stress-strain-strength behavior of cohesionless and cohesive soils and application to lateral earth stresses | stress-strain-strength behavior of cohesionless and cohesive soils and application to lateral earth stresses | bearing capacity and slope stability | bearing capacity and slope stability | consolidation theory | consolidation theory | settlement analyses | settlement analyses | laboratory methods | laboratory methods | soil properties | soil properties | design practice | design practice

License

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TALAT Lecture 3300: Fundamentals of Metal Forming

Description

This lecture gives a brief review of the fundamental terms and laws governing metal forming at room temperature as well as at high temperatures. This lecture is a necessary prerequisite to understand the more specific treatment of metal forming subjects such as forging, impact extrusion and sheet metal forming in the subsequent TALAT This lectures 3400 to 3800. General background in production engineering, machine tools is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | machining | forming | classification | state of stress | type of raw material | forming temperature | induction of forces | flow stress | plastic strain | logarithmic plastic strain | logarithmic strain in upsetting | law of volume constancy | plastic strain rate | plastic strain acceleration | plastic flow | maximum shear stress | von mises flow criterion | yield criteria for plane stress | yield locus | law of plastic flow | flow curves | room temperature | elevated temperatures | average flow stress | forming energy | heat development | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 3300: Fundamentals of Metal Forming

Description

This lecture gives a brief review of the fundamental terms and laws governing metal forming at room temperature as well as at high temperatures. This lecture is a necessary prerequisite to understand the more specific treatment of metal forming subjects such as forging, impact extrusion and sheet metal forming in the subsequent TALAT This lectures 3400 to 3800. General background in production engineering, machine tools is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | machining | forming | classification | state of stress | type of raw material | forming temperature | induction of forces | flow stress | plastic strain | logarithmic plastic strain | logarithmic strain in upsetting | law of volume constancy | plastic strain rate | plastic strain acceleration | plastic flow | maximum shear stress | von Mises flow criterion | yield criteria for plane stress | yield locus | law of plastic flow | flow curves | room temperature | elevated temperatures | average flow stress | forming energy | heat development | corematerials | ukoer

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2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT) 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT)

Description

This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design. This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | buckling | buckling | vibration | vibration | polymers | polymers | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | strength | strength | ductility | ductility | stress | stress | stress concentration | stress concentration | sheet bending | sheet bending | heat treatment | heat treatment | fracture | fracture | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fatigue | fatigue | solid materials | solid materials | mechanical loading | mechanical loading | thermal loading | thermal loading | design-limiting behavior | design-limiting behavior | stiffness | stiffness | toughness | toughness | durability | durability | engineering materials | engineering materials | materials-limiting problem | materials-limiting problem | materials selection | materials selection

License

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4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT) 4.461 Building Technology I: Materials and Construction (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students. This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems as well as an introduction to energy issues in buildings. It emphasizes basic systematic and elemental behavior, principles of structural behavior, and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The course also introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort. It is a required class for M. Arch. students.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams | materials | materials | wood | wood | steel | steel | concrete | concrete

License

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Structures and materials : section 7 stress concentration : presentation transcript

Description

This open educational resource was released through the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre Open Engineering Resources Pilot project. The project was funded by HEFCE and the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme.

Subjects

ukoer | engscoer | cc-by | engcetl | loughborough university | higher education | learning | loughboroughunioer | engineering | tta104 | fatigue | stress concentration factor formulae | failure | loads | stress concentration | fracture | loading | structural failure | stress | forces | force | fracture toughness | yield limited design | far-field stress | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT) 3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking is explored. Students taking the gr This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking is explored. Students taking the gr

Subjects

honeycombs | honeycombs | foams | foams | lattices | lattices | stress strain | stress strain | elasticity | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | fracture | trabecular bone | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffolds | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants | cellular structures in plants

License

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT) 4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

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12.090 Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-Generated Sedimentary Structures (MIT) 12.090 Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-Generated Sedimentary Structures (MIT)

Description

This course begins by introducing students to aspects of fluid dynamics relevant to transport and deposition of particulate sedimentary materials. Emphasis is on the structure of turbulent shear flows and the forces exerted by fluid motions on bed of loosed sediment. With fluid dynamics as background, the course deals with sediment movement as bed load and suspended load, and with the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of ripple and dune bed forms. The course concludes with basic material on the styles of current-generated primary sedimentary structures, with emphasis on cross stratification. This course begins by introducing students to aspects of fluid dynamics relevant to transport and deposition of particulate sedimentary materials. Emphasis is on the structure of turbulent shear flows and the forces exerted by fluid motions on bed of loosed sediment. With fluid dynamics as background, the course deals with sediment movement as bed load and suspended load, and with the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of ripple and dune bed forms. The course concludes with basic material on the styles of current-generated primary sedimentary structures, with emphasis on cross stratification.

Subjects

geology | geology | rocks | rocks | sedimentary | sedimentary | fluid motions | fluid motions | sediment transport | sediment transport | sedimentary structures | sedimentary structures | viscosity | viscosity | diffusion | diffusion | turbulence | turbulence | boundary layers | boundary layers | laminar flow | laminar flow | stress | stress | shear stress | shear stress | oscillatory-flow | oscillatory-flow | combined-flow | combined-flow | wind ripples | wind ripples | Eolian dunes | Eolian dunes | cross stratification | cross stratification | planar lamination | planar lamination

License

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4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT) 4.463 Building Technologies III: Building Structural Systems II (MIT)

Description

This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course addresses advanced topics in structures, exterior envelopes and contemporary production technologies. It continues the exploration of structural elements and systems; expanding to include more complex determinant, indeterminate, long-span and high-rise systems. Some of the topics covered include reinforced concrete, steel and engineered wood design, and an introduction to tensile systems. The contemporary exterior envelope is discussed with an emphasis on the classification of systems, their performance attributes and advanced manufacturing technologies. This course is the second of two graduate structures courses, the first of which is 4.462. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

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12.520 Geodynamics (MIT) 12.520 Geodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course deals with mechanics of deformation of the crust and mantle, with emphasis on the importance of different rheological descriptions: brittle, elastic, linear and nonlinear fluids, and viscoelastic. This course deals with mechanics of deformation of the crust and mantle, with emphasis on the importance of different rheological descriptions: brittle, elastic, linear and nonlinear fluids, and viscoelastic.

Subjects

Geodynamics | Geodynamics | mechanics of deformation | mechanics of deformation | crust | crust | mantle | mantle | rheological descriptions | rheological descriptions | brittle | brittle | elastic | elastic | linear | linear | nonlinear fluids | nonlinear fluids | viscoelastic | viscoelastic | surface tractions | surface tractions | tectonic stress | tectonic stress | quantity expression | quantity expression | stress variations | stress variations | sandbox tectonics | sandbox tectonics | displacement gradients | displacement gradients | strains | strains | rotations | rotations | finite strain | finite strain | motivation | motivation | dislocation | dislocation | plates | plates | topography | topography | rock rheology | rock rheology | accretionary wedge | accretionary wedge | linear fluids | linear fluids | elastic models | elastic models | newtonian fluids | newtonian fluids | stream function | stream function | Rayleigh-Taylor instability | Rayleigh-Taylor instability | diapirism | diapirism | diapirs | diapirs | plumes | plumes | corner flow | corner flow | power law creep | power law creep | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | porous media | porous media | Elsasser model | Elsasser model | time dependent porous flow | time dependent porous flow

License

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4.440 Basic Structural Theory (MIT) 4.440 Basic Structural Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the static behavior of structures and strength of materials. Topics covered include: reactions, truss analysis, stability of structures, stress and strain at a point, shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, Mohr's Circle, column buckling, and deflection of beams. Laboratory sessions are included where students are asked to solve structural problems by building simple models and testing them. This course introduces the static behavior of structures and strength of materials. Topics covered include: reactions, truss analysis, stability of structures, stress and strain at a point, shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, Mohr's Circle, column buckling, and deflection of beams. Laboratory sessions are included where students are asked to solve structural problems by building simple models and testing them.

Subjects

structures | structures | building technology | building technology | construction | construction | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | reactions | reactions | truss analysis | truss analysis | stability of structures | stability of structures | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | column buckling | column buckling | deflection of beams | deflection of beams

License

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4.462 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I (MIT) 4.462 Building Technologies II: Building Structural Systems I (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic systematic and elemental behavior; principles of structural behavior and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The subject introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort, as they relate to building design and construction. This course is the first of two graduate structures courses, the second of which is 4.463. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440. This course serves as an introduction to the history, theory, and construction of basic structural systems with an introduction to energy issues in buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of basic systematic and elemental behavior; principles of structural behavior and analysis of individual structural elements and strategies for load carrying. The subject introduces fundamental energy topics including thermodynamics, psychrometrics, and comfort, as they relate to building design and construction. This course is the first of two graduate structures courses, the second of which is 4.463. They offer an expanded version of the content presented in the undergraduate course, 4.440.

Subjects

column buckling | and deflection of beams | column buckling | and deflection of beams | Mohr's Circle | Mohr's Circle | stresses in beams | stresses in beams | shear and bending moment diagrams | shear and bending moment diagrams | stress and strain at a point | stress and strain at a point | stability of structures | stability of structures | truss analysis | truss analysis | reactions | reactions | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | static behavior of structures and strength of materials | construction | construction | building technology | building technology | structures | structures | column buckling and deflection of beams | column buckling and deflection of beams

License

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1.050 Engineering Mechanics I (MIT) 1.050 Engineering Mechanics I (MIT)

Description

This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures. This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures.

Subjects

mechanics | mechanics | materials | materials | structures | structures | engineering design | engineering design | Galileo's problem | Galileo's problem | dimensional analysis | dimensional analysis | atomic explosion | atomic explosion | World Trade Center towers | World Trade Center towers | stress | stress | continuum model | continuum model | beam model | beam model | strength models | strength models | strength criteria | strength criteria | stress plane | stress plane | deformation | deformation | strain tensor | strain tensor | Mohr circle | Mohr circle | elasticity | elasticity | energy bounds | energy bounds | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | collapse | collapse

License

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2.080J Structural Mechanics (MIT) 2.080J Structural Mechanics (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Topics include analysis of small deflections of beams, moderately large deflections of beams, columns, cables, and shafts; elastic and plastic buckling of columns, thin walled sections and plates; exact and approximate methods; energy methods; principle of virtual work; introduction to failure analysis of structures. We will include examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures such as the collision and grounding of ships. This course covers the fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Topics include analysis of small deflections of beams, moderately large deflections of beams, columns, cables, and shafts; elastic and plastic buckling of columns, thin walled sections and plates; exact and approximate methods; energy methods; principle of virtual work; introduction to failure analysis of structures. We will include examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures such as the collision and grounding of ships.

Subjects

vector | vector | tensor | tensor | static equilibrium | static equilibrium | strain | strain | stress | stress | Mohr's circle | Mohr's circle | elastic | elastic | virtual work | virtual work | minimum total potential energy | minimum total potential energy | beam deflections | beam deflections | energy method | energy method | shear stress | shear stress | beam | beam | shaft | shaft | experimental mechanics | experimental mechanics | stability | stability | Rayleigh-Ritz quotient | Rayleigh-Ritz quotient | column | column | buckling | buckling | load | load | plate | plate | yield | yield | plasticity | plasticity | cylinder | cylinder | fracture | fracture | implosion | implosion | submarine | submarine | Columbia Space Shuttle | Columbia Space Shuttle | BP | BP | Deepwater Horizon | Deepwater Horizon | crashworthiness | crashworthiness

License

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1.033 Mechanics of Material Systems: An Energy Approach (MIT) 1.033 Mechanics of Material Systems: An Energy Approach (MIT)

Description

1.033 provides an introduction to continuum mechanics and material modeling of engineering materials based on first energy principles: deformation and strain; momentum balance, stress and stress states; elasticity and elasticity bounds; plasticity and yield design. The overarching theme is a unified mechanistic language using thermodynamics, which allows understanding, modeling and design of a large range of engineering materials. This course is offered both to undergraduate (1.033) and graduate (1.57) students. 1.033 provides an introduction to continuum mechanics and material modeling of engineering materials based on first energy principles: deformation and strain; momentum balance, stress and stress states; elasticity and elasticity bounds; plasticity and yield design. The overarching theme is a unified mechanistic language using thermodynamics, which allows understanding, modeling and design of a large range of engineering materials. This course is offered both to undergraduate (1.033) and graduate (1.57) students.

Subjects

continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | material modeling | material modeling | engineering materials | engineering materials | energy principles: deformation and strain | energy principles: deformation and strain | momentum balance | momentum balance | stress | stress | stress states | stress states | elasticity and elasticity bounds | elasticity and elasticity bounds | plasticity | plasticity | yield design | yield design | first energy principles | first energy principles | deformation | deformation | strain | strain | elasticity bounds | elasticity bounds | unified mechanistic language | unified mechanistic language | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | engineering structures | engineering structures | unified framework | unified framework | irreversible processes | irreversible processes | structural engineering | structural engineering | soil mechanics | soil mechanics | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | materials science | materials science | solids | solids | durability mechanics | durability mechanics

License

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT) 3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi

Subjects

honeycombs | honeycombs | foams | foams | lattices | lattices | stress strain | stress strain | elasticity | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | fracture | trabecular bone | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffolds | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants | cellular structures in plants

License

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