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21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT) 21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT)

Description

Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | myth | myth | ritual | ritual | symbolism | symbolism | animals | animals | symbolic system | symbolic system | meaning | meaning | life cycle | life cycle | metaphor | metaphor | figurative language | figurative language | human body | human body | cosmology | cosmology | magic | magic | narrative | narrative | mythology | mythology | patterns | patterns | culture | culture | sign | sign | tropes | tropes | classification | classification | interpretation | interpretation | folktale | folktale | power | power | passage | passage | persuasion | persuasion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

The course covers group theory and its representations, and focuses on the Sylow theorem, Schur's lemma, and proof of the orthogonality relations. It also analyzes the rings, the factorization processes, and the fields. Topics such as the formal construction of integers and polynomials, homomorphisms and ideals, the Gauss' lemma, quadratic imaginary integers, Gauss primes, and finite and function fields are discussed in detail. The course covers group theory and its representations, and focuses on the Sylow theorem, Schur's lemma, and proof of the orthogonality relations. It also analyzes the rings, the factorization processes, and the fields. Topics such as the formal construction of integers and polynomials, homomorphisms and ideals, the Gauss' lemma, quadratic imaginary integers, Gauss primes, and finite and function fields are discussed in detail.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

Seminar in real-time language comprehension. Models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Ambiguity resolution. Linguistic complexity. The use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. The psychological reality of linguistic representations. Seminar in real-time language comprehension. Models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Ambiguity resolution. Linguistic complexity. The use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. The psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language | language | comprehension | comprehension | sentence | sentence | linguistic | linguistic | psychology | psychology | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | symbolic | symbolic | connectionist | connectionist | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | lexicon | lexicon | syntactic | syntactic | semantic | semantic | pragmatic | pragmatic | contextual | contextual | prosodic | prosodic | working memory | working memory | processing | processing | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory. This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Cambridge. King's College Chapel (Interior, Side Chapels)

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.01103 Title: Cambridge. King's College Chapel (Interior, Side Chapels) Building Date: 1446-1547 Photograph date: ca. 1865-ca. 1885 Location: Europe: United Kingdom; Cambridge Materials: albumen print Image: 6 1/8 x 8 in.; 15.5575 x 20.32 cm Style: English Gothic Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5t7n There are no known copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | kingscollegechapelcambridgeengland | chapels | religiousinteriors | stainedglass | lancetwindows | escutcheonscoatsofarms | symbols | crowns | symbolsofoffice | roses | flowers | fleursdelis | lions | cats | animals | dragons | greyhounds | dogs | universities | culidentifier:value=155309001103 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

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18.702 Algebra II (MIT) 18.702 Algebra II (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory. This undergraduate level course follows Algebra I. Topics include group representations, rings, ideals, fields, polynomial rings, modules, factorization, integers in quadratic number fields, field extensions, and Galois theory.

Subjects

Sylow theorems | Sylow theorems | Group Representations | Group Representations | definitions | definitions | unitary representations | unitary representations | characters | characters | Schur's Lemma | Schur's Lemma | Rings: Basic Definitions | Rings: Basic Definitions | homomorphisms | homomorphisms | fractions | fractions | Factorization | Factorization | unique factorization | unique factorization | Gauss' Lemma | Gauss' Lemma | explicit factorization | explicit factorization | maximal ideals | maximal ideals | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Quadratic Imaginary Integers | Gauss Primes | Gauss Primes | quadratic integers | quadratic integers | ideal factorization | ideal factorization | ideal classes | ideal classes | Linear Algebra over a Ring | Linear Algebra over a Ring | free modules | free modules | integer matrices | integer matrices | generators and relations | generators and relations | structure of abelian groups | structure of abelian groups | Rings: Abstract Constructions | Rings: Abstract Constructions | relations in a ring | relations in a ring | adjoining elements | adjoining elements | Fields: Field Extensions | Fields: Field Extensions | algebraic elements | algebraic elements | degree of field extension | degree of field extension | ruler and compass | ruler and compass | symbolic adjunction | symbolic adjunction | finite fields | finite fields | Fields: Galois Theory | Fields: Galois Theory | the main theorem | the main theorem | cubic equations | cubic equations | symmetric functions | symmetric functions | primitive elements | primitive elements | quartic equations | quartic equations | quintic equations | quintic equations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT) 9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

This course covers central topics in language processing, including: the structure of language; sentence, discourse, and morphological processing; storage and access of words in the mental dictionary; speech processing; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and ambiguity resolution. The course also considers computational modeling, including connectionist models; the relationship between language and thought; and issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods are also examined. This course covers central topics in language processing, including: the structure of language; sentence, discourse, and morphological processing; storage and access of words in the mental dictionary; speech processing; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and ambiguity resolution. The course also considers computational modeling, including connectionist models; the relationship between language and thought; and issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods are also examined.

Subjects

language | language | comprehension | comprehension | sentence | sentence | linguistic | linguistic | psychology | psychology | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | symbolic | symbolic | connectionist | connectionist | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | lexicon | lexicon | syntactic | syntactic | semantic | semantic | pragmatic | pragmatic | contextual | contextual | prosodic | prosodic | working memory | working memory | processing | processing | 9.59 | 9.59 | 24.905 | 24.905

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB® (MIT) 6.094 Introduction to MATLAB® (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with a computer running MATLAB for each student. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with a computer running MATLAB for each student. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

matlab | matlab | simulink | simulink | matlab programming | matlab programming | variables | variables | plotting | plotting | scripts | scripts | functions | functions | flow control | flow control | linear algebra | linear algebra | polynomials | polynomials | optimization | optimization | differential equations | differential equations | ode | ode | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | data structures | data structures | images | images | animation | animation | debugging | debugging | symbolic math | symbolic math | toolboxes | toolboxes | scope | scope | function block | function block | nervous system | nervous system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Transistors : introduction to transistors

Description

These are a series of diagrams that allows the user to view the diagrams and symbols of NPN and PNP style construction.

Subjects

transistor circuit symbols | electronics | symbols | transistors | MATHEMATICS | ENGINEERING | Design and delivery of programmes | Learning | UK EL03 = SCQF 3 | Level 3 | Entry level 2 | NICAT Entry | Access 3 | Foundation SG | UK EL04 = SCQF 4 | Foundational Level | NICAT 1 | CQFW 1 | Foundation | GCSE D-G | NVQ 1 | Intermediate 1 | | Engineering | H000 | SCIENCES and MATHEMATICS | X | R

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Edinburgh. Holyrood Palace, West Front

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.01214 Title: Edinburgh. Holyrood Palace, West Front Photographer: George Washington Wilson (Scottish, 1823-1893) Building Date: ca. 1500-ca. 1525 Photograph date: ca. 1865-ca. 1885 Location: Europe: United Kingdom; Edinburgh Materials: albumen print Image: 7 1/2 x 11 1/2 in.; 19.05 x 29.21 cm Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5tcn There are no known copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | holyroodpalaceedinburghscotland | palaces | turrets | entrances | escutcheonscoatsofarms | symbols | fountains | crowns | symbolsofoffice | carriages | crenellations | hills | culidentifier:value=155309001214 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT) 6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho. This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | introduction to MATLAB | scripts | scripts | making variables | making variables | manipulating variables | manipulating variables | functions | functions | flow control | flow control | line plots | line plots | surface plots | surface plots | vectorization | vectorization | linear algebra | linear algebra | optimization | optimization | differential equations | differential equations | data structures | data structures | debugging | debugging | animation | animation | symbolic math | symbolic math | Simulink | Simulink | file input/output | file input/output | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT) 6.945 Adventures in Advanced Symbolic Programming (MIT)

Description

This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language. This course covers concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of large software systems that can be adapted to uses not anticipated by the designer. Applications include compilers, computer-algebra systems, deductive systems, and some artificial intelligence applications. Topics include combinators, generic operations, pattern matching, pattern-directed invocation, rule systems, backtracking, dependencies, indeterminacy, memoization, constraint propagation, and incremental refinement. Substantial weekly programming assignments are an integral part of the subject. There will be extensive programming assignments, using MIT/GNU Scheme. Students should have significant programming experience in Scheme, Common Lisp, Haskell, CAML or some other "functional" language.

Subjects

Scheme | Scheme | symbolic programming | symbolic programming | additive systems | additive systems | generic operations | generic operations | language layers | language layers | pattern-directed invocation | pattern-directed invocation | searching | searching | amb | amb | backtracking | backtracking | propagation systems | propagation systems | constraints | constraints | truth maintenance | truth maintenance | continuations | continuations | structure and interpretation of computer programs | structure and interpretation of computer programs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT) 9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

This course covers central topics in language processing, including: the structure of language; sentence, discourse, and morphological processing; storage and access of words in the mental dictionary; speech processing; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and ambiguity resolution. The course also considers computational modeling, including connectionist models; the relationship between language and thought; and issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods are also examined. This course covers central topics in language processing, including: the structure of language; sentence, discourse, and morphological processing; storage and access of words in the mental dictionary; speech processing; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and ambiguity resolution. The course also considers computational modeling, including connectionist models; the relationship between language and thought; and issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods are also examined.

Subjects

language | language | comprehension | comprehension | sentence | sentence | linguistic | linguistic | psychology | psychology | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | symbolic | symbolic | connectionist | connectionist | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | lexicon | lexicon | syntactic | syntactic | semantic | semantic | pragmatic | pragmatic | contextual | contextual | prosodic | prosodic | working memory | working memory | processing | processing | 9.59 | 9.59 | 24.905 | 24.905

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games. An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subjects

a | a | games | games | narrative | narrative | playtesting | playtesting | student work | student work | student notes | student notes | chance | chance | competition | competition | information | information | probability | probability | strategy | strategy | theory | theory | symbolism | symbolism | rules | rules | gambling | gambling | emergence | emergence | progression | progression | randomness | randomness | cooperation | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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outside the gates! outside the gates!

Description

Subjects

thestereopairsphotographcollection | thestereopairsphotographcollection | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | stereographicnegatives | stereographicnegatives | jamessimonton | jamessimonton | frederickhollandmares | frederickhollandmares | johnfortunelawrence | johnfortunelawrence | williammervynlawrence | williammervynlawrence | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | ornategatesandpillars | ornategatesandpillars | wroughtiron | wroughtiron | heraldicsymbols | heraldicsymbols | outsidecar | outsidecar | sidecar | sidecar | jarvey | jarvey | locationidentified | locationidentified | muckross | muckross | muckrosshouse | muckrosshouse | muckrossroad | muckrossroad | killarney | killarney | countykerry | countykerry | gatehouse | gatehouse | pillars | pillars | jauntingcar | jauntingcar | driver | driver | gates | gates | wyvern | wyvern | richardperrottandsons | richardperrottandsons | hiveironworks | hiveironworks | gatelodge | gatelodge | threelionsrampant | threelionsrampant

License

No known copyright restrictions

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116 St James's Street - Probably Guinness owned 116 St James's Street - Probably Guinness owned

Description

Subjects

dublin | dublin | rolleiflex | rolleiflex | gate | gate | 1966 | 1966 | guinness | guinness | matchbox | matchbox | 1865 | 1865 | guinnessbrewery | guinnessbrewery | leinster | leinster | stjamessstreet | stjamessstreet | codublin | codublin | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | rolleiflexcamera | rolleiflexcamera | militarysymbols | militarysymbols | parnellsquarenorth | parnellsquarenorth | locationidentified | locationidentified | fordthames400e | fordthames400e | charlemonthouse | charlemonthouse | elinorwiltshire | elinorwiltshire | wiltshirephotographiccollection | wiltshirephotographiccollection | droppedkeystone | droppedkeystone | elinoro’brienwiltshire | elinoro’brienwiltshire | reginaldwiltshire | reginaldwiltshire | vehicleidentified | vehicleidentified | 116stjames’sstreet | 116stjames’sstreet | ornatearchandgateway | ornatearchandgateway | wwwbuildingsofirelandie | wwwbuildingsofirelandie | freestandingpedimentedgateway | freestandingpedimentedgateway | erectedc1865 | erectedc1865 | carvedvoussoirs | carvedvoussoirs | rusticatedcutgranitepiers | rusticatedcutgranitepiers | carvedgranitecornice | carvedgranitecornice | carvedinlaidplaque | carvedinlaidplaque

License

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6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT) 6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

automatic discourse processing | automatic discourse processing | natural language | natural language | speech processing | speech processing | discourse structure | discourse structure | models of coherence and cohesion | models of coherence and cohesion | plan recognition algorithms | plan recognition algorithms | text segmentation | text segmentation | symbolic learning | symbolic learning | machine learning | machine learning | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | dialogue systems | dialogue systems | automatic essay writing | automatic essay writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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An introduction to business cultures An introduction to business cultures

Description

Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their 'business culture'. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This free course, An introduction to business cultures, explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies. First published on Tue, 12 Jul 2011 as An introduction to business cultures. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their 'business culture'. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This free course, An introduction to business cultures, explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now possible to see and (feel) the difference between companies. First published on Tue, 12 Jul 2011 as An introduction to business cultures. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Business Studies | Business Studies | business | business | United States of America | United States of America | symbols | symbols | B120_1 | B120_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | complex social creatures | complex social creatures | mental functions | mental functions | behavior | behavior | symbolic interpretation | symbolic interpretation | critical analysis | critical analysis | social sciences | social sciences | sociology | sociology | perception | perception | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological | human development | human development | natural sciences | natural sciences | humanities | humanities | psychologist. | psychologist.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Trinity College, Brian Boro's Harp, Dublin City, Co. Dublin Trinity College, Brian Boro's Harp, Dublin City, Co. Dublin

Description

Subjects

robertfrench | robertfrench | williamlawrence | williamlawrence | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | lawrencephotographicstudio | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | thelawrencephotographcollection | glassnegative | glassnegative | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | brianborusharp | brianborusharp | trinitycollege | trinitycollege | dublin | dublin | library | library | harp | harp | trinityharp | trinityharp | restoration | restoration | kidnap | kidnap | cláirseach | cláirseach | explore | explore | coatofarms | coatofarms | symbol | symbol | georgepetrie | georgepetrie | oneill | oneill

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Chteau de Blois, Staircase (Interior)

Description

Collection: A. D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library Accession Number: 15/5/3090.01255 Title: Chteau de Blois, Staircase (Interior) Photographer: Sraphin Mdric Mieusement (French, 1840-1905) Building Date: 1515-1525 Photograph date: ca. 1874-ca. 1890 Location: Europe: France; Blois Materials: albumen print Image: 9.8425 x 13.8583 in.; 25 x 35.2 cm Style: Renaissance Provenance: Gift of Andrew Dickson White Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5tf2 There are no known copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source. We had some help with the geocoding from Web Services by Yahoo!

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | chteaudebloisbloisfrance | chteaux | interiors | palaces | stairways | spiralstairs | landingsstaircomponents | reliefsculptures | salamanders | reptiles | animals | symbols | crowns | symbolsofoffice | escutcheonscoatsofarms | doors | culidentifier:value=155309001255 | culidentifier:lunafield=accessionnumber

License

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21A.212 Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism (MIT)

Description

Human beings are symbol-making as well as tool-making animals. We understand our world and shape our lives in large part by assigning meanings to objects, beings, and persons; by connecting things together in symbolic patterns; and by creating elaborate forms of symbolic action and narrative. In this introductory subject we consider how symbols are created and structured; how they draw on and give meaning to different domains of the human world; how they are woven into politics, family life, and the life cycle; and how we can interpret them. The semester will be devoted to a number of topics in symbolism. Metaphor and Other Figurative Language The Raw Materials of Symbolism, especially Animals and The Human Body Cosmology and Complex Symbolic Systems Ritual, including Symbolic Curing

Subjects

anthropology | myth | ritual | symbolism | animals | symbolic system | meaning | life cycle | metaphor | figurative language | human body | cosmology | magic | narrative | mythology | patterns | culture | sign | tropes | classification | interpretation | folktale | power | passage | persuasion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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