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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language | language | structure | structure | theory | theory | language structure | language structure | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | languages | languages | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language acquisition | language acquisition | processing | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics

License

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others. This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This course studies what is language and what does knowledge of a language consist of. It asks how do children learn languages and is language unique to humans; why are there many languages; how do languages change; is any language or dialect superior to another; and how are speech and writing related. Context for these and similar questions is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. No prior training in linguistics is assumed. This course studies what is language and what does knowledge of a language consist of. It asks how do children learn languages and is language unique to humans; why are there many languages; how do languages change; is any language or dialect superior to another; and how are speech and writing related. Context for these and similar questions is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. No prior training in linguistics is assumed.

Subjects

language | language | linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | phonetics | phonetics | consonants | consonants | vowels | vowels | McGurk effect | McGurk effect | phonology | phonology | phoneme | phoneme | allophone | allophone | lexicon | lexicon | affixes | affixes | topicalization | topicalization | pronunciation | pronunciation | semantics | semantics | truth conditions | truth conditions | synchronic | synchronic | diachronic | diachronic | language families | language families | Ebonics | Ebonics | dialect | dialect

License

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24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT) 24.973 Advanced Semantics (MIT)

Description

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as

Subjects

semantics | semantics | logic | logic | meaning | meaning | syntactic systems | syntactic systems | generative grammar | generative grammar | displacement | displacement | intensional semantics | intensional semantics | Hintikka's idea | Hintikka's idea | accessibility relations | accessibility relations | modality | modality | quantificational theory of modality | quantificational theory of modality | material implication analysis | material implication analysis | strict implication analysis | strict implication analysis | tense | tense | conditionals | conditionals | progressive | progressive | perfect | perfect | de re | de re | de dicto | de dicto | raised subjects | raised subjects | scope paradox | scope paradox | overt world variables | overt world variables | restrictors | restrictors | syntax movement | syntax movement | wh-movement | wh-movement | DP | DP | VP | VP

License

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24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT) 24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others. This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | architectures | syntax module of grammar | syntax module of grammar | models | models | ancient and medieval proposals | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | structuralism | early generative grammar | early generative grammar | generative semantics | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | LFG | HPSG | HPSG | TAG | TAG | functionalist perspectives | functionalist perspectives

License

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT) 24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | government | government | binding theory | binding theory | principles | principles | parameters | parameters | minimalist program | minimalist program | phrase structure | phrase structure | argument | argument | syntactic expression | syntactic expression | passives | passives | unaccusativity | unaccusativity | relational grammar | relational grammar | lexical | lexical | functional | functional | case | case | licensing | licensing | null bubjects | null bubjects | control | control | head movement | head movement | nonconfigurationality | nonconfigurationality | double objects | double objects | psych verbs | psych verbs

License

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24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT) 24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT)

Description

The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena. The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena.

Subjects

Phonology | Phonology | research | research | phonological theory | phonological theory | models | models | approaches | approaches | modes of argumentation | modes of argumentation | research tools: problem sets | research tools: problem sets | squibs | squibs | abstracts | abstracts | reviews | reviews | markedness | markedness | phonological representations | phonological representations | features | features | prosodies | prosodies | syllables | syllables | stress | stress | lexicon | lexicon | morphology | morphology | syntax | syntax | acquisition | acquisition | perception | perception | sound change | sound change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT) 24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT)

Description

The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena. The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena.

Subjects

Phonology | Phonology | research | research | phonological theory | phonological theory | models | models | approaches | approaches | modes of argumentation | modes of argumentation | research tools: problem sets | research tools: problem sets | squibs | squibs | abstracts | abstracts | reviews | reviews | markedness | markedness | phonological representations | phonological representations | features | features | prosodies | prosodies | syllables | syllables | stress | stress | lexicon | lexicon | morphology | morphology | syntax | syntax | acquisition | acquisition | perception | perception | sound change | sound change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT) 9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain. Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | abnormal language | abnormal language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | binding theory | binding theory | finiteness | finiteness | syntactic theory | syntactic theory | language lateralization | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | hemispherectomies | aphasia | aphasia | language loss | language loss | syntactic working memory | syntactic working memory | comprehension | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | syntactic movement | animal communication | animal communication | EOI stage | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | Williams syndrome | language processing | language processing | 9.56 | 9.56 | 24.907 | 24.907

License

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half - century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about. From time to time, we will discuss related work in language acquisition and processing. The class will emphasize ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. At the same time, you will learn the mechanics of one particular approach (sometimes called Principles and Parameters syntax). Most of all, the course tries to show why the study of syntax is exciting, and why its results are important to researchers in other language sciences. The class assumes some familiarity with basic concepts of t

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | language | structure | theory | language structure | philosophy | cognitive psychology | languages | syntactic theory | language acquisition | processing | Principles and Parameters syntax | theoretical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT) 9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT)

Description

Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children. Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | language acquisition | language acquisition | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | phonology | phonology | grammatical theory | grammatical theory | children | children | 9.601 | 9.601 | 24.949 | 24.949

License

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

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12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT) 12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT)

Description

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB®, and Mathematica®. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. Students first learn the basic usage of each language, common types of problems encountered, and techniques for solving a variety of problems encountered in contemporary research: examination of data with visualization techniques, numerical analysis, and methods of dissemination and verification. No prior programming experience is required.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .c and .f files found on this course site. C++ compiler is required to This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB®, and Mathematica®. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. Students first learn the basic usage of each language, common types of problems encountered, and techniques for solving a variety of problems encountered in contemporary research: examination of data with visualization techniques, numerical analysis, and methods of dissemination and verification. No prior programming experience is required.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .c and .f files found on this course site. C++ compiler is required to

Subjects

programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | FORTRAN | FORTRAN | C | C | C++ | C++ | Matlab | Matlab | Mathematica | Mathematica | program design | program design | algorithm development and verification | algorithm development and verification | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | examination of data with visualization techniques | examination of data with visualization techniques | numerical analysis | numerical analysis | methods of dissemination and verification | methods of dissemination and verification | algorithms | algorithms | formula | formula | formulae | formulae | computer programs | computer programs | graphics | graphics | computing languages | computing languages | structure | structure | documentation | documentation | program interface | program interface | syntax | syntax | advanced modeling | advanced modeling | simulation systems | simulation systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT) 24.902 Language and its Structure II: Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar". This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar".

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | language structure | language structure | theory | theory | binding theory | binding theory | syntactic movement | syntactic movement | wh-movement | wh-movement | verbs | verbs | tense | tense | A-movement | A-movement | specifiers | specifiers | complementizers | complementizers | theta-roles | theta-roles | subcategorization | subcategorization | covert movement | covert movement

License

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others. This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

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Programming Languages

Description

This course covers the entire family of programming languages, starting with an introduction to programming languages in general and a discussion of the features and functionality that make up a modern programming language. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Computer Science 404)

Subjects

computer science | programming | scripting | code | syntax | semantics | typing | imperative | object-oriented | functional | logical | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | syntax module of grammar | models | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | early generative grammar | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | HPSG | TAG | functionalist perspectives

License

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9.56J Abnormal Language (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the linguistic study of language pathology, concentrating on experimental approaches and theoretical explanations. Discussion of Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, normal aging, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hemispherectomy and aphasia. Focuses on the comparison of linguistic abilities among these syndromes, while drawing clear comparisons with first and second language acquisition. Topics include the lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Relates the lost linguistic abilities in these syndromes to properties of the brain.

Subjects

linguistics | abnormal language | syntax | language acquisition | binding theory | finiteness | syntactic theory | language lateralization | hemispherectomies | aphasia | language loss | syntactic working memory | comprehension | Extended Optional Infinitive Stage | syntactic movement | animal communication | EOI stage | Williams syndrome | language processing | 9.56 | 24.907

License

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12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming (MIT)

Description

This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB®, and Mathematica®. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages. Students first learn the basic usage of each language, common types of problems encountered, and techniques for solving a variety of problems encountered in contemporary research: examination of data with visualization techniques, numerical analysis, and methods of dissemination and verification. No prior programming experience is required.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .c and .f files found on this course site. C++ compiler is required to

Subjects

programming languages | techniques used by physical scientists | FORTRAN | C | C++ | Matlab | Mathematica | program design | algorithm development and verification | comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages | examination of data with visualization techniques | numerical analysis | methods of dissemination and verification | algorithms | formula | formulae | computer programs | graphics | computing languages | structure | documentation | program interface | syntax | advanced modeling | simulation systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand

Subjects

linguistics | syntax | government | binding theory | principles | parameters | minimalist program | phrase structure | argument | syntactic expression | passives | unaccusativity | relational grammar | lexical | functional | case | licensing | null bubjects | control | head movement | nonconfigurationality | double objects | psych verbs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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