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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT) 7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | lethal poison | Ricin | Ricin | Diphtheria | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | tetracycline | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | drug resistance | drug resistance | protein engineering | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | rRNA | mRNA | mRNA | tRNA | tRNA | translation factors | translation factors | genetic code | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside | Aminoglycoside

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT) 7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT)

Description

The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in

Subjects

RNA | RNA | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | high-throughput sequencing | high-throughput sequencing | snRNAs | snRNAs | pre-mRNA splicing | pre-mRNA splicing | snoRNAs | snoRNAs | regulatory molecules | regulatory molecules | siRNA | siRNA | piRNAs | piRNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT)

Description

The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in

Subjects

RNA | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | high-throughput sequencing | snRNAs | pre-mRNA splicing | snoRNAs | regulatory molecules | siRNA | piRNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | Ricin | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | protein synthesis | drug resistance | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | mRNA | tRNA | translation factors | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | DNA | RNA | genetics | genes | genetic material | double helix | molecular biology | biotechnology | structure | function | heredity | complementarity | biological materials | genetic code | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | tRNA | reverse transcription | central dogma | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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