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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | 21A.302 | WGS.271 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | medical technologies | biotechnologies | biotechnologies | halth | halth | sexuality | sexuality | morality | morality | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | end of life care | healing practices | healing practices | anthropology | anthropology | medical experimentation | medical experimentation | sterilization | sterilization | Lynchburg | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | biological citizenship | clinical trials | clinical trials

License

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11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT) 11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT)

Description

Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i

Subjects

communication technologies | communication technologies | geographic information systems | geographic information systems | multimedia technologies | multimedia technologies | institutional analysis | institutional analysis | prototyping | prototyping | urban planning tools | urban planning tools | metropolitan information infrastructure | metropolitan information infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | representing urban knowledge | representing urban knowledge

License

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | Planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

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MAS.963 Technological Tools for School Reform (MIT) MAS.963 Technological Tools for School Reform (MIT)

Description

This course explores the potential impact of modern technologies on the school reforms debate. The first part of the course provides an overview of the current state of the school reform debate and reviews the ideas in the progressive school reform movement, as well as examining the new public charter school in Cambridge as a case study. The second part of the course requires critical study of research projects that hold promise as inspirations and guidelines for concrete multidisciplinary activities and curriculum for progressive charter schools. The course concludes with a discussion of the challenges in scaling the successful innovations in school reform to new contexts. This course explores the potential impact of modern technologies on the school reforms debate. The first part of the course provides an overview of the current state of the school reform debate and reviews the ideas in the progressive school reform movement, as well as examining the new public charter school in Cambridge as a case study. The second part of the course requires critical study of research projects that hold promise as inspirations and guidelines for concrete multidisciplinary activities and curriculum for progressive charter schools. The course concludes with a discussion of the challenges in scaling the successful innovations in school reform to new contexts.

Subjects

modern technologies | modern technologies | school reforms | school reforms | progressive school reform | progressive school reform | CCSC | CCSC | Community Charter School of Cambridge | Community Charter School of Cambridge | charter schools | charter schools | education | education | innovative education | innovative education | No Child left behind | No Child left behind | learning communities | learning communities | shared display technologies | shared display technologies | educational technology | educational technology | media literacy | media literacy

License

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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT) 6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this 6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical | optical signals | optical signals | optical devices | optical devices | transmission | transmission | detection | detection | storage | storage | processing | processing | display | display | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | diffraction | holography | holography | lasers | lasers | LEDs | LEDs | spatial light modulation | spatial light modulation | display technologies | display technologies | optical waveguides | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | optical storage media | disks | disks | 3-D holographic material | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | image processing | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | radar systems | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161 | 6.161

License

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21A.302J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics, examining moral foundations of the science and practice of Western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. It evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Also discussed are critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

21A.302 | WGS.271 | bio-medical ethics | medical technologies | biotechnologies | halth | sexuality | morality | race | ethnicity | kinship | gender | abortion | contraception | reproductive technologies | pharmaceuticals | end of life care | healing practices | anthropology | medical experimentation | sterilization | Lynchburg | biological citizenship | clinical trials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Video Conferencing for Special Needs Community

Description

By establishing this model of good practice it will increase efficiency and reduce travel cost, time and carbon foot print for learners and staff.

Subjects

video conferencing | VLE use | special needs students | technologies | technologies in special needs education | FESkills | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | thermo-sciences | thermo-sciences | energy | energy | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | electricity | electricity | architecture | architecture | building technology | building technology | civil engineering | civil engineering | buildings | buildings | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | air-water vapor mixtures | air-water vapor mixtures | thermal comfort | thermal comfort | heat pumps | heat pumps | refrigeration cycles | refrigeration cycles | thermodynamic performance | thermodynamic performance | heat transfer | heat transfer | creative design projects | creative design projects | air conditioning | air conditioning | energy consumption | energy consumption | building designs | building designs | building technologies | building technologies | operating schemes | operating schemes | properties of gases | properties of gases | properties of liquids | properties of liquids | power producing systems | power producing systems | energy losses | energy losses | building envelope | building envelope | 4.42 | 4.42 | 1.044 | 1.044 | 2.66 | 2.66

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.115 Gender and Technology (MIT) WGS.115 Gender and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course considers a wide range of issues related to the contemporary and historical use of technology, the development of new technologies, and the cultural representation of technology, including the role women have played in the development of technology and the effect of technological change on the roles of women and ideas of gender. It discusses the social implications of technology and its understanding and deployment in different cultural contexts. It investigates the relationships between technology and identity categories, such as gender, race, class, and sexuality, and examines how technology offers possibilities for new social relations and how to evaluate them. This course considers a wide range of issues related to the contemporary and historical use of technology, the development of new technologies, and the cultural representation of technology, including the role women have played in the development of technology and the effect of technological change on the roles of women and ideas of gender. It discusses the social implications of technology and its understanding and deployment in different cultural contexts. It investigates the relationships between technology and identity categories, such as gender, race, class, and sexuality, and examines how technology offers possibilities for new social relations and how to evaluate them.

Subjects

technology | technology | gender | gender | feminism | feminism | gendered technology | gendered technology | household technologies | household technologies | sex trade | sex trade | telephony | telephony | robots | robots

License

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Technological Tools for School Reform (MIT)

Description

This course explores the potential impact of modern technologies on the school reforms debate. The first part of the course provides an overview of the current state of the school reform debate and reviews the ideas in the progressive school reform movement, as well as examining the new public charter school in Cambridge as a case study. The second part of the course requires critical study of research projects that hold promise as inspirations and guidelines for concrete multidisciplinary activities and curriculum for progressive charter schools. The course concludes with a discussion of the challenges in scaling the successful innovations in school reform to new contexts.

Subjects

modern technologies | school reforms | progressive school reform | CCSC | Community Charter School of Cambridge | charter schools | education | innovative education | No Child left behind | learning communities | shared display technologies | educational technology | media literacy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

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17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches. | branches. | branches | branches

License

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | Assessment of energy systems | resources | resources | extraction | extraction | conversion | conversion | and end-use | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | 21st century | sustainable manner | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | biomass energy | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | solar energy | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | analysis of energy technology systems | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance

License

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Digital Literacies in Higher Education

Description

The 'Digital Literacies as a Postgraduate Attribute' project was run at the IOE between 2011 and 2013 and is one of twelve recent JISC projects in the broad area of academic literacies. This guide summarises the findings and key messages from this study. Though the research project focussed on postgraduate students (the IOE being mainly a postgraduate institution until its recent intake of undergraduate students in 2012), the findings share similarities to other user behaviour studies such as the Google Generation and User Behaviour in Resource Discovery studies which focus on undergraduate students.

Subjects

postgraduate skills | digital libraries | online user behaviour | mobile technologies | pervasive technologies | information literacy | digital literacies | academic literacies

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | water supply | sanitation | developing countries | sanitation technologies | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | privatization | consumer demand | community participation | planning processes | environmental health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | case studies | policy memos | journals | environment | sustainability | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Which technologies do Oxford University students use?

Description

Melissa Highton, University of Oxford, presents the findings of the DIGE Project which investigated the use of technology by students from Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

engage | apple | twitter | oxford university | VLE | facebook | learning technologies | student | oxford | engage | apple | twitter | oxford university | VLE | facebook | learning technologies | student | oxford | 2012-10-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.467 Research Seminar in Deep Sea Archaeology (MIT) STS.467 Research Seminar in Deep Sea Archaeology (MIT)

Description

STS.467 examines the intellectual foundations of archaeology in the deep sea. The course explores the current convergence of oceanography, archaeology, and engineering which allows scientists to discover, survey, and excavate shipwrecks in deep water with robots and submarines. The course seeks to address the following questions: How are new devices best employed for archaeological work? How do new capabilities (e.g. higher frequencies, higher resolution, all digital data output) change operations plans and research designs? What new technologies will be required? Area studies focus on the Aegean in Minoan times and western Sicily during Phoenician, Greek, and Roman hegemony. STS.467 examines the intellectual foundations of archaeology in the deep sea. The course explores the current convergence of oceanography, archaeology, and engineering which allows scientists to discover, survey, and excavate shipwrecks in deep water with robots and submarines. The course seeks to address the following questions: How are new devices best employed for archaeological work? How do new capabilities (e.g. higher frequencies, higher resolution, all digital data output) change operations plans and research designs? What new technologies will be required? Area studies focus on the Aegean in Minoan times and western Sicily during Phoenician, Greek, and Roman hegemony.

Subjects

archaeology | archaeology | deep sea archaeology | deep sea archaeology | oceanography | oceanography | survey | survey | new technologies | new technologies | excavation | excavation | shipwreck | shipwreck | robots | robots | submarines | submarines | Aegean | Aegean | Minoan | Minoan | Sicily | Sicily | Phoenician | Phoenician | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 4103: Self-Piercing Riveting

Description

This lecture describes the processes of self-piercing riveting, which is a relatively new fastening method for sheet metal parts. General mechanical engineering background and familiarity with the subject matter covered in TALAT This lecture 4101 is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | joining | fastening | mechanical | self-piercing riveting | indirect self-piercing riveting | direct self-piercing riveting | joining element | half-hollow rivet | solid rivet | fastening technologies | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 4105: Combination of Joining Methods

Description

This lecture describes the combination of mechanical joining with adhesive bonding with respect to application criteria, productions considerations and resultant properties. General mechanical engineering background and familiarity with the subject matter covered in TALAT This lectures 4101- 4104 is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | joining | fastening | mechanical | classification | combined joints | elementary joints | adhesive joining | fold-adhesive joints | aircraft industry | material locking joints | form locking joints | shear testing | fractured surface | production | adhesive-clinch joint combination | technical operations | clinched joints | adhesives | combined joining technologies | fatigue tests | mechanical properties | impact strength | shear strength | ageing | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Using MyFeedBack to help students engage with their feedback at UWS

Description

MyFeedBack is an interactive mobile web 2.0 learning platform for formative assessment and feedback. It was developed as part of a research study investigating whether students’ motivation, engagement and communication improved when using the students’ own mobile handheld device for assessment and feedback. The uniqueness of this prototype lies in the interactivity of the mobile application that enables several learning / teaching activities under one platform. It combines aspects of other technologies such as clickers, VoiceThread and Peerwise on a mobile platform.

Subjects

case studies | myfeedback | 2014 | apps | assessment tools | higher education | learning technologies | mobile devices | mobile technologies | online learning | staff development | uws | university of the west of scotland | vle | virtual learning environments | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Using mobile devices and apps in additional support for learning in Cumbernauld College

Description

Use of mobile devices and apps brought many benefits for the students including increased confidence and independence, improved memory and retention and improved Core Skills such as spelling, vocabulary and arithmetic.

Subjects

case studies | 2013 | access and inclusion | accessibility technologies | apps | mobile technologies | cumbernauld college | None

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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