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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Literature | Comics | Comics | Culture | Culture | Literary Fiction | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives | contemporary graphic narratives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.730-5 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience—specifically, prose that is both critical and personal, that features your ideas, your perspective, and your voice to engage readers. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that critically engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of pieces that address current issues in popular culture. These readings will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal, attending always to the ways yo

Subjects

contemporary | contemporary | contemporary issues | contemporary issues | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | economic imperialism | economic imperialism | sexual and reproductive politics | sexual and reproductive politics | the ethics of biotechnologies | the ethics of biotechnologies | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | the romance of technology | the romance of technology | robotics and cyborg cultures | robotics and cyborg cultures | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | Honeymoon Phase | Honeymoon Phase | Negotiation Phase | Negotiation Phase | Adjustment Phase | Adjustment Phase | Reverse Culture Shock | Reverse Culture Shock | anxiety | anxiety | feelings | feelings | surprise | surprise | disorientation | disorientation | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | current | current

License

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17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

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British public policy British public policy

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M13045 | M13045 | ukoer | ukoer | policy-making in contemporary Britain | policy-making in contemporary Britain | new forms of governance | new forms of governance | policy-making process | policy-making process | the British state | the British state | government | government | joined up government | joined up government | contemporary British political science | contemporary British political science | New Right ideology | New Right ideology

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary. This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary.

Subjects

multi-linear narrative | multi-linear narrative | nonlinear narrative | nonlinear narrative | digital | digital | media | media | communication culture | communication culture | gaming | gaming | television | television | digital aesthetics | digital aesthetics | contemporary art | contemporary art | film | film | synchronic narrative | synchronic narrative | contemporary media | contemporary media | digital narrative | digital narrative | video games | video games | game culture platforms | game culture platforms | Second Life | Second Life | LARP | LARP | ARG | ARG | MMO | MMO | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489 | CMS.845 | CMS.845

License

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21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT) 21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl

Subjects

Writing on contemporary issues | Writing on contemporary issues | social issues | social issues | ethical issues | ethical issues | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | assimilation | assimilation | current | current

License

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21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT) 21W.730 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Social and Ethical Issues (MIT)

Description

This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl This course provides the opportunity for students-as readers, viewers, writers and speakers-to engage with social and ethical issues they care deeply about. Over the course of the semester, through discussing the writing of classic and contemporary authors, we will explore different perspectives on a range of social issues such as free speech, poverty and homelessness, mental illness, capital punishment and racial and gender inequality. In addition, we will analyze selected documentary and feature films and photographs that represent or dramatize social problems or issues. In assigned essays, students will have the opportunity to write about social and ethical issues of their own choice. This course aims to help students to grow significantly in their ability to understand and grappl

Subjects

Writing on contemporary issues | Writing on contemporary issues | social issues | social issues | ethical issues | ethical issues | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | culture shock | culture shock | urban and environmental crises | urban and environmental crises | issues of race and gender | issues of race and gender | media saturation | media saturation | language and representation | language and representation | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | uncertainty | uncertainty | confusion | confusion | assimilating | assimilating | assimilation | assimilation | current | current

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

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21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT) 21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project. This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project.

Subjects

communication | communication | contemporary engineering and science professional | contemporary engineering and science professional | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | communication as organizational process | communication as organizational process | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | writing as collaboration | writing as collaboration | the writing process | the writing process | the elements of style | the elements of style | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | case studies | case studies | writing assignments | writing assignments | oral presentation | oral presentation | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics

License

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4.210 Precedents in Critical Practice (MIT) 4.210 Precedents in Critical Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop a map of contemporary architectural practice and discourse. The seminar examines six themes in terms of their recent history: city and global economy, urban plan and map of operations, program and performance, drawing and scripting, image and surface, and utopia and projection. Students will study buildings and read relevant texts in order to place recent architectural projects in disciplinary and cultural context. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop a map of contemporary architectural practice and discourse. The seminar examines six themes in terms of their recent history: city and global economy, urban plan and map of operations, program and performance, drawing and scripting, image and surface, and utopia and projection. Students will study buildings and read relevant texts in order to place recent architectural projects in disciplinary and cultural context.

Subjects

architectural criticism | architectural criticism | manifesto | manifesto | contemporary architecture | contemporary architecture | architectural practice | architectural practice | city | city | global economy | global economy | urban plan | urban plan | map | map | drawing | drawing | scripting | scripting | utopia | utopia | program | program | performance | performance | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | society | geography | america | europe | asia | africa | third worrld | development | contemporary culture | religion | politics | youth | developing nation | first world | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | religious movements | social movements | political movements | pop | popular music | political cartoons | Japan | popular culture | world hip-hop | rap | media power | consumer activism | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT) 4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT)

Description

This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world. This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Subjects

contemporary art | contemporary art | modernism | modernism | minimalist art | minimalist art | Warhol's factory | Warhol's factory | Jackson Pollock | Jackson Pollock | painting | painting | expression | expression | art and politics | art and politics | fluxus | fluxus

License

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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT) 24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | brain | philosophy | philosophy | science | science | holism | holism | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT) 21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT)

Description

Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods. Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Subjects

form | form | structure | structure | notation | notation | musical score | musical score | composer | composer | composing | composing | music history | music history | deep listening | deep listening | sound | sound | soundwalk | soundwalk | instrument building | instrument building | contemporary music | contemporary music | avant-garde music | avant-garde music | experimental music | experimental music | graphic score | graphic score | Musique Concrete | Musique Concrete | vocal music | vocal music

License

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21M.342 Composing for Jazz Orchestra (MIT) 21M.342 Composing for Jazz Orchestra (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This class explores composition and arrangement for the large jazz ensemble from 1920s foundations to current postmodern practice. Consideration given to a variety of styles and to the interaction of improvisation and composition. Study of works by Basie, Ellington, Evans, Gillespie, Golson, Mingus, Morris, Nelson, Williams, and others. Open rehearsals, workshops, and performances of student compositions by the MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble and the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra.   Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This class explores composition and arrangement for the large jazz ensemble from 1920s foundations to current postmodern practice. Consideration given to a variety of styles and to the interaction of improvisation and composition. Study of works by Basie, Ellington, Evans, Gillespie, Golson, Mingus, Morris, Nelson, Williams, and others. Open rehearsals, workshops, and performances of student compositions by the MIT Festival Jazz Ensemble and the Aardvark Jazz Orchestra.  

Subjects

jazz band | jazz band | large ensemble jazz | large ensemble jazz | modern jazz | modern jazz | contemporary jazz | contemporary jazz | big band | big band | swing | swing | Duke Ellington | Duke Ellington | George Russell | George Russell | Bill Lowe | Bill Lowe | Mulatu Astatke | Mulatu Astatke | Ethiojazz | Ethiojazz | Ethio-jazz | Ethio-jazz | ethiopian jazz | ethiopian jazz | Ethiopiques | Ethiopiques | Either-Orchestra | Either-Orchestra | Russ Gershon | Russ Gershon | Aardvark Jazz Orchestra | Aardvark Jazz Orchestra | Gil Evans | Gil Evans | Miles Davis | Miles Davis | Birth of the Cool | Birth of the Cool | Steve Lajoie | Steve Lajoie | jazz arranging | jazz arranging | jazz composition | jazz composition | improvisation | improvisation | Walter Thompson | Walter Thompson | Soundpainting | Soundpainting

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21M.351 Music Composition (MIT) 21M.351 Music Composition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course features directed composition of larger forms of original writing involving voices and/or instruments. It includes a weekly seminar in composition for the presentation and discussion of work in progress. Students are expected to produce at least one substantive work, performed in public, by the end of the term. Contemporary compositions and major works from 20th-century music literature are studied. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course features directed composition of larger forms of original writing involving voices and/or instruments. It includes a weekly seminar in composition for the presentation and discussion of work in progress. Students are expected to produce at least one substantive work, performed in public, by the end of the term. Contemporary compositions and major works from 20th-century music literature are studied.

Subjects

classical music | classical music | composer | composer | contemporary music | contemporary music | 20th century music | 20th century music | chamber music | chamber music | atonal | atonal | post-tonal | post-tonal | avant-garde music | avant-garde music | orchestration | orchestration | art song | art song | song | song

License

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22.012 Seminar: Fusion and Plasma Physics (MIT) 22.012 Seminar: Fusion and Plasma Physics (MIT)

Description

This course uses lectures and discussion to introduce the range of topics relevant to plasma physics and fusion engineering. An introductory discussion of the economic and ecological motivation for the development of fusion power is also presented. Contemporary magnetic confinement schemes, theoretical questions, and engineering considerations are presented by expert guest lecturers. Students enrolled in the course also tour the Plasma Science and Fusion Center experimental facilities. This course uses lectures and discussion to introduce the range of topics relevant to plasma physics and fusion engineering. An introductory discussion of the economic and ecological motivation for the development of fusion power is also presented. Contemporary magnetic confinement schemes, theoretical questions, and engineering considerations are presented by expert guest lecturers. Students enrolled in the course also tour the Plasma Science and Fusion Center experimental facilities.

Subjects

plasma physics | plasma physics | fusion engineering | fusion engineering | fusion power | fusion power | contemporary magnetic confinement schemes | contemporary magnetic confinement schemes | Plasma Science and Fusion Center | Plasma Science and Fusion Center | ITER | ITER

License

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17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China

License

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21M.361 Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition) (MIT) 21M.361 Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This class explores sound and what can be done with it. Sources are recorded from students' surroundings - sampled and electronically generated (both analog and digital). Assignments include composing with the sampled sounds, feedback, and noise, using digital signal processing (DSP), convolution, algorithms, and simple mixing. The class focuses on sonic and compositional aspects rather than technology, math, or acoustics, though these are examined in varying detail. Students complete weekly composition and listening assignments; material for the latter is drawn from sound art, experimental electronica, conventional and non-conventional classical electronic works, popular music, and previous students' compositions. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This class explores sound and what can be done with it. Sources are recorded from students' surroundings - sampled and electronically generated (both analog and digital). Assignments include composing with the sampled sounds, feedback, and noise, using digital signal processing (DSP), convolution, algorithms, and simple mixing. The class focuses on sonic and compositional aspects rather than technology, math, or acoustics, though these are examined in varying detail. Students complete weekly composition and listening assignments; material for the latter is drawn from sound art, experimental electronica, conventional and non-conventional classical electronic works, popular music, and previous students' compositions.

Subjects

computer music | computer music | sound | sound | music | music | audio | audio | listening | listening | electronic music | electronic music | new music | new music | electronica | electronica | sound art | sound art | noise | noise | noise music | noise music | avant-garde | avant-garde | contemporary music | contemporary music | modern music | modern music | composition | composition | recording | recording | music production | music production | recording studio | recording studio | audio software | audio software | recording software | recording software | sampling | sampling | synthesis | synthesis | audio engineering | audio engineering | mixing | mixing | Radiohead | Radiohead

License

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21W.765J Interactive and Non-Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of creating narratives that take advantage of the flexibility of form offered by the computer. The course studies the structural properties of book-based narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time and of storyline. The class analyzes the structure and evaluates the literary qualities of computer-based narratives including hypertexts, adventure games, and classic artificial intelligence programs like Eliza. With this base, students use authoring systems to model a variety of narrative techniques and to create their own fictions. Knowledge of programming is helpful but not necessary.

Subjects

multi-linear narrative | nonlinear narrative | digital | media | communication culture | gaming | television | digital aesthetics | contemporary art | film | synchronic narrative | contemporary media | digital narrative | video games | game culture platforms | Second Life | LARP | ARG | MMO | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | CMS.845

License

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Comics | Culture | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives

License

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21H.952J Readings in American History Since 1877 (MIT) 21H.952J Readings in American History Since 1877 (MIT)

Description

This seminar aims to develop a teaching knowledge of the field through extensive reading and discussion of major works. The reading covers a broad range of topics - political, economic, social, and cultural - and represents a variety of historical methods. This seminar aims to develop a teaching knowledge of the field through extensive reading and discussion of major works. The reading covers a broad range of topics - political, economic, social, and cultural - and represents a variety of historical methods.

Subjects

united states | united states | history | history | contemporary | contemporary | post-reconstruction | post-reconstruction | literature | literature | twentieth century | twentieth century | nineteen century | nineteen century | immigration | immigration | urbanization | urbanization | populism | populism | progressivism | progressivism | modern american culture | modern american culture | depression | depression | world war | world war | new dea | new dea | politics | politics | new deal | new deal | american history | american history | political | political | culture | culture | cultural | cultural | social | social | economic | economic | 21H.952 | 21H.952 | STS.410 | STS.410

License

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Company (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Company (MIT)

Description

Taking as its starting point the works of one of Britain's most respected, prolific—and funny—living dramatists, this seminar will explore a wide range of knowledge in fields such as math, philosophy, politics, history and art. The careful reading and discussion of plays by (Sir) Tom Stoppard and some of his most compelling contemporaries (including Caryl Churchill, Anna Deveare Smith and Howard Barker) will allow us to time-travel and explore other cultures, and to think about the medium of drama as well as one writer's work in depth. Some seminar participants will report on earlier plays that influenced these writers, others will research everything from Lord Byron's poetry to the bridges of Konigsberg, from Dadaism to Charter 77. Employing a variety of critical approaches Taking as its starting point the works of one of Britain's most respected, prolific—and funny—living dramatists, this seminar will explore a wide range of knowledge in fields such as math, philosophy, politics, history and art. The careful reading and discussion of plays by (Sir) Tom Stoppard and some of his most compelling contemporaries (including Caryl Churchill, Anna Deveare Smith and Howard Barker) will allow us to time-travel and explore other cultures, and to think about the medium of drama as well as one writer's work in depth. Some seminar participants will report on earlier plays that influenced these writers, others will research everything from Lord Byron's poetry to the bridges of Konigsberg, from Dadaism to Charter 77. Employing a variety of critical approaches

Subjects

contemporary literature | contemporary literature | drama | drama | stoppard | stoppard | churchill | churchill | play | play | british | british | text analysis | text analysis | stagecraft | stagecraft | writer | writer | history | history | politics | politics | culture | culture | performance | performance | comedy | comedy | Tom Stoppard | Tom Stoppard | Caryl Churchill | Caryl Churchill | Anna Deveare Smith | Anna Deveare Smith | Howard Barker | Howard Barker | dramatist | dramatist

License

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