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17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT) 17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT)

Description

This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the

Subjects

terrorism | terrorism | non-state actors | non-state actors | state-sponsored terrorism | state-sponsored terrorism | suicide terrorism | suicide terrorism | militias | militias | warlords | warlords | terrorists | terrorists | insurgents | insurgents | terror networks | terror networks | political violence | political violence | collective action | collective action | terrorist strategies | terrorist strategies | Mujahideen | Mujahideen | jihad | jihad | hamas | hamas | al-Qaida | al-Qaida | Hezbollah | Hezbollah | counterterrorism | counterterrorism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT)

Description

This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the

Subjects

terrorism | non-state actors | state-sponsored terrorism | suicide terrorism | militias | warlords | terrorists | insurgents | terror networks | political violence | collective action | terrorist strategies | Mujahideen | jihad | hamas | al-Qaida | Hezbollah | counterterrorism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Shadow of the ICC: Positive Complementarity and the Situation in Kenya

Description

Professor Chandra Sriram (SOAS) gives a talk for the Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict/Changing Character of War Seminar Series. Introduced by Jennifer Welsh (Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | 2011-10-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Invisible War: The United States and The Iraq Sanctions

Description

Special seminar from the Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC) given by Professor Jay Gordan (Fairfield University with Professor David Miller (Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

america | sanctions | united states | middle east | terrorism | iraq | war | armed conflict | america | sanctions | united states | middle east | terrorism | iraq | war | armed conflict | 2010-11-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT) SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies. Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | futurology | historiography | historiography | change | change | fractals | fractals | nuclear war | nuclear war | global warming | global warming | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | singularity | singularity | politics | politics | memetics | memetics | demographics | demographics | power laws | power laws | recent past | recent past | near future | near future | prediction | prediction | history | history | revolution | revolution | memes | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT) STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe

Subjects

risk | risk | science | science | society | society | ethics | ethics | politics | politics | technology | technology | history | history | controversy | controversy | atomic | atomic | whistleblowing | whistleblowing | GMO | GMO | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | nuclear | nuclear | space exploration | space exploration | energy | energy | policy | policy | debate | debate | museum | museum | archeology | archeology | war | war | terrorism | terrorism | tradeoff | tradeoff | decision making | decision making | medicine | medicine | health care policy | health care policy | biotechnology | biotechnology | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | human subjects | human subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT) 17.473 The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation: Nuclear History, Strategy, and Statecraft (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences. This course provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. It introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. It also examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences.

Subjects

nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | strategy | strategy | statecraft | statecraft | world politics | world politics | global community | global community | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | foreign policy | foreign policy | international relations | international relations | rogue states | rogue states | non-state | non-state | deterrence | deterrence | containment | containment | atomic age | atomic age | bomb scare | bomb scare | Second World War | Second World War | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project | Hiroshima | Hiroshima | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear age | nuclear age | nonproliferation | nonproliferation | early Cold War | early Cold War | the Berlin Crisis | the Berlin Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | the Cuban Missile Crisis | Detente | Detente | nuclear arms control | nuclear arms control | nuclear balance | nuclear balance | Euromissile Crisis | Euromissile Crisis | Nuclear Suppliers Group | Nuclear Suppliers Group | parity | parity | Dr. Strangelove | Dr. Strangelove | terrorism | terrorism | global zero | global zero | U.S. policy | U.S. policy | national security | national security | nucelar dynamics | nucelar dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT) 21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | libertarianism | history | history | politics | politics | state | state | regulatory state | regulatory state | freedom | freedom | property | property | equality | equality | community | community | republicanism | republicanism | liberty | liberty | slavery | slavery | religious freedom | religious freedom | civil liberties | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | health care | health care | financial market | financial market | the internet | the internet | Rawls | Rawls | Nozick | Nozick | Obamacare | Obamacare | Rand Paul | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | de Toqueville | economic good | economic good | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | capitalism | capitalism | John Locke | John Locke | distributive justice | distributive justice | communitarianism | communitarianism | civil republicanism | civil republicanism | chattel | chattel | Freedom Principle | Freedom Principle | antislavery | antislavery | First Amendment | First Amendment | free exercise | free exercise | religious accomodation | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | phone surveillance | private regulation | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Shaming Nations? What works and why in the fight against money laundering and terrorism financing?

Description

The seminar examined the Financial Action Task Force's (FATF) compliance-inducing mechanisms based on an analysis of its naming and shaming practices. The seminar further focused on the implementation of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing standards in the United States, the United Kingdom and Italy in order to contend that the Task Force?s success in getting countries to comply with its 40 Plus 9 Recommendations can be explained by looking at the conformity-inducing group pressures that the Task Force generates for states that are concerned about status markers and shame avoidance. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

shaming nations | money laundering | terrorism financing | FATF | crime prevention | shaming nations | money laundering | terrorism financing | FATF | crime prevention | 2014-06-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Who is the Terrorist? Memories, Victims and the Use of Legitimate Violence

Description

Dr Diego Muro, Santander Visiting Fellow, St. Antony's College, University of Oxford, gives a talk for the OTJR Seminar Series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

legitimate violence | justice | violence | legitimacy | transitional justice | terrorism | war | legitimate violence | justice | violence | legitimacy | transitional justice | terrorism | war

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.500J Technology and Culture (MIT) 21A.500J Technology and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a range of social and historical settings. The class is organized around two topics: Identity and infrastructure, and will combine interactive lectures, film screenings, readings, and discussion. This subject examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a range of social and historical settings. The class is organized around two topics: Identity and infrastructure, and will combine interactive lectures, film screenings, readings, and discussion.

Subjects

21A.500 | 21A.500 | STS.075 | STS.075 | technology | technology | technology and culture | technology and culture | biotechnology | biotechnology | computers and the self | computers and the self | digital world | digital world | science and religion | science and religion | racial economy | racial economy | ethics | ethics | technoscience | technoscience | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | cloning | cloning | genetically modified food | genetically modified food | GMO | GMO | gender identity | gender identity | information age | information age

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.340J Technology and Culture (MIT) 21A.340J Technology and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a variety of social and historical settings ranging from 19th century factories to 21st century techno dance floors, from colonial Melanesia to capitalist Massachusetts. We organize our discussions around three broad questions, corresponding to three syllabus themes: What cultural effects and risks follow from treating biology as technology? How have computers and information technologies changed the ways we think about ourselves? How are politics built into the infrastructures within which we live? We will be interested in how technologies have been used both to facilitate and undermine relations of inequality, and in whether technology has produced a better world, and for whom. This course examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a variety of social and historical settings ranging from 19th century factories to 21st century techno dance floors, from colonial Melanesia to capitalist Massachusetts. We organize our discussions around three broad questions, corresponding to three syllabus themes: What cultural effects and risks follow from treating biology as technology? How have computers and information technologies changed the ways we think about ourselves? How are politics built into the infrastructures within which we live? We will be interested in how technologies have been used both to facilitate and undermine relations of inequality, and in whether technology has produced a better world, and for whom.

Subjects

Technology | Technology | Technology and culture | Technology and culture | Biotechnology | Biotechnology | Computers and the self | Computers and the self | Digital world | Digital world | Science and religion | Science and religion | Racial economy | Racial economy | Ethics | Ethics | Technoscience | Technoscience | Bioterrorism | Bioterrorism | Cloning | Cloning | Genetically modified food | Genetically modified food | GMO | GMO | Gender identity | Gender identity | Information age | Information age | 21A.340 | 21A.340 | STS.075 | STS.075

License

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STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World (MIT) STS.069 Technology in a Dangerous World (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Aim is to analyze important current events for what they reveal about the nature and working of our technological world. Starting point is connection between technology and terrorism. Subject also explores how a human-built world can foster insecurity and danger, and how human beings respond. Many invited guests help develop a strong interdisciplinary approach (science, engineering, social science, humanities). Topics include technological risk and remediation, sociotechnical systems, imagination of disaster, technology and identity, technology and religion, technology and education, and technology and trust. Written and oral assignments and a final project required. Service-learning proposals and web-based presentations, in addition Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Aim is to analyze important current events for what they reveal about the nature and working of our technological world. Starting point is connection between technology and terrorism. Subject also explores how a human-built world can foster insecurity and danger, and how human beings respond. Many invited guests help develop a strong interdisciplinary approach (science, engineering, social science, humanities). Topics include technological risk and remediation, sociotechnical systems, imagination of disaster, technology and identity, technology and religion, technology and education, and technology and trust. Written and oral assignments and a final project required. Service-learning proposals and web-based presentations, in addition

Subjects

current events | current events | technology | technology | terrorism | terrorism | danger | danger | technological risk | technological risk | remediation | remediation | sociotechnical systems | sociotechnical systems | imagination of disaster | imagination of disaster | identity | identity | religion | religion | education | education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT) ESD.10 Introduction to Technology and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and g

Subjects

Politics | Politics | decision making | decision making | negotiation | negotiation | planning | planning | wedge game | wedge game | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | NRC | NRC | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | government | government | public policy | public policy | globalization | globalization | science | science | EPA | EPA | NSF | NSF | transportation | transportation | urban planning | urban planning | standards | standards | risk | risk | risk assessment | risk assessment | engineering | engineering | energy | energy | internet | internet | network neutrality | network neutrality | regulation | regulation | security | security | 9/11 | 9/11 | September 11 | September 11 | terrorism | terrorism | defense | defense | tradeoff | tradeoff

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.953 U.S. Budgets for National Security (MIT) 17.953 U.S. Budgets for National Security (MIT)

Description

This course is for students who want to know how the dollars we spend on national security relate to military forces, systems, and policy choices, and who wish to develop a personal tool kit for framing and assessing defense policy alternatives. This course is for students who want to know how the dollars we spend on national security relate to military forces, systems, and policy choices, and who wish to develop a personal tool kit for framing and assessing defense policy alternatives.

Subjects

United States | United States | national defense | national defense | homeland security | homeland security | military operations | military operations | budget | budget | military forces | military forces | systems | systems | policy | policy | strategy | strategy | spending | spending | terrorism | terrorism | military pay | military pay | military benefits | military benefits | federal spending | federal spending | infrastructure | infrastructure | readiness | readiness | alternative | alternative | defense | defense | Iraq war | Iraq war | foreign aid | foreign aid | national security | national security | defense budget | defense budget

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.615 Games for Social Change (MIT) CMS.615 Games for Social Change (MIT)

Description

Run as a workshop, students collaborate in teams to design and prototype games for social change and civic engagement. Through readings, discussion, and presentations, we explore principles of game design and the social history of games. Guest speakers from academia, industry, the non-profit sector, and the gaming community contribute unique and diverse perspectives. Course culminates in an end of semester open house to showcase our games. Run as a workshop, students collaborate in teams to design and prototype games for social change and civic engagement. Through readings, discussion, and presentations, we explore principles of game design and the social history of games. Guest speakers from academia, industry, the non-profit sector, and the gaming community contribute unique and diverse perspectives. Course culminates in an end of semester open house to showcase our games.

Subjects

games | games | society | society | civic | civic | engagement | engagement | change | change | world | world | peace | peace | purposeful | purposeful | media | media | play | play | sweatshop | sweatshop | refugee | refugee | terrorism | terrorism | kitty | kitty

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT) 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Intelligence and National Security (MIT)

Description

This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform. This course will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community and its relationship to national security policy. It will look in some detail at the key intelligence agencies and the functions they perform, including collection, analysis, counterintelligence and covert action. It will also look at some of the key intelligence missions, such as strategic warning, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterinsurgency. Finally, it will examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including its successes and failures, relationship to policymakers, congressional oversight, and the need for reform.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | natioanl security | natioanl security | origins | origins | structure | structure | functions | functions | U.S. | U.S. | Intelligence | Intelligence | Community | Community | national security policy | national security policy | intelligence agencies | intelligence agencies | collection | collection | analysis | analysis | counterintelligence | counterintelligence | covert action | covert action | strategic warning | strategic warning | counterterrorism | counterterrorism | counterproliferation | counterproliferation | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | controversies | controversies | policymakers | policymakers | congressional oversight | congressional oversight | reform | reform

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.256 The Coming Years (MIT) ES.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies. Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | futurology | historiography | historiography | change | change | fractals | fractals | nuclear war | nuclear war | global warming | global warming | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | singularity | singularity | politics | politics | memetics | memetics | demographics | demographics | power laws | power laws | recent past | recent past | near future | near future | prediction | prediction | history | history | revolution | revolution | memes | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ón Global ón Global

Description

La asignatura se divide en tres partes. Una primera parte introductoria en la que se ofrece una panorámica de la información internacional con sus principales fuentes y los profesionales dedicados a ella, así como su reflejo en los medios a través de los diferentes géneros periodísticos. En la segunda parte se aborda y analiza la evolución de los conflictos desde el punto de vista de su cobertura mediática que ha conducido hacia un periodismo internacional acorde con la nueva era digital. En la tercera y última parte se examina el papel de otros actores internacionales en la información internacional, en especial dos organizaciones internacionales (Unión Europea y OTAN), así como el rol de las ONGS en informaciones internacionales con impacto global como las referidas al cambio La asignatura se divide en tres partes. Una primera parte introductoria en la que se ofrece una panorámica de la información internacional con sus principales fuentes y los profesionales dedicados a ella, así como su reflejo en los medios a través de los diferentes géneros periodísticos. En la segunda parte se aborda y analiza la evolución de los conflictos desde el punto de vista de su cobertura mediática que ha conducido hacia un periodismo internacional acorde con la nueva era digital. En la tercera y última parte se examina el papel de otros actores internacionales en la información internacional, en especial dos organizaciones internacionales (Unión Europea y OTAN), así como el rol de las ONGS en informaciones internacionales con impacto global como las referidas al cambio

Subjects

Periodismo | Periodismo | ciberpropaganda | ciberpropaganda | élico | élico | entrevista | entrevista | ón y OTAN | ón y OTAN | ómetro de conflictos | ómetro de conflictos | Grado en Periodismo | Grado en Periodismo | fuentes | fuentes | periodismo de conflictos | periodismo de conflictos | caso Couso | caso Couso | ática conflictos | ática conflictos | nuevas guerras | nuevas guerras | warblogs | warblogs | ón y ONGS | ón y ONGS | agencias | agencias | conflictos olvidados | conflictos olvidados | 2011 | 2011 | corresponsales | corresponsales | conflictos y redes sociales | conflictos y redes sociales | ónica | ónica | ética y conflictos | ética y conflictos | éneros periodísticos | éneros periodísticos | periodismo internacional | periodismo internacional | ón internacional | ón internacional | ciberterrorismo | ciberterrorismo | ón y Unión Europea | ón y Unión Europea

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | citizenship | nationhood | race | ethnicity | religion | mass incarceration | poverty | class | criminal punishment | death penalty | drug laws | police | terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | militarization | guilt | innocence | illegal alien | undocumented | immigration | deportation | civil liberties | internment | Japanese | WWII | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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