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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers. The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers.

Subjects

context-dependency | context-dependency | presupposition | presupposition | implicature | implicature | context-change | context-change | focus | focus | topic | topic | semantics | semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | quantification | quantification | definiteness | definiteness | presupposition projection | presupposition projection | conditionals | conditionals | modality | modality | anaphora | anaphora | questions | questions | answers | answers

License

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers. The course introduces formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis is on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. It also covers applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers.

Subjects

context-dependency | context-dependency | presupposition | presupposition | implicature | implicature | context-change | context-change | focus and topic | focus and topic | division of labor | division of labor | semantics | semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | quantification | quantification | definiteness | definiteness | presupposition projection | presupposition projection | conditionals | conditionals | modality | modality | anaphora | anaphora

License

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An appeal to all that doubt, or disbelieve the truths of the Gospel: whether they be Deists, Arians, Socinians, or nominal Christians, in which the true grounds and reasons of the whole Christian faith and life are plainly and fully demonstrated, to which are added, some animadversions upon Dr. Trapp's late reply An appeal to all that doubt, or disbelieve the truths of the Gospel: whether they be Deists, Arians, Socinians, or nominal Christians, in which the true grounds and reasons of the whole Christian faith and life are plainly and fully demonstrated, to which are added, some animadversions upon Dr. Trapp's late reply

Description

ebook version of An appeal to all that doubt, or disbelieve the truths of the Gospel: whether they be Deists, Arians, Socinians, or nominal Christians, in which the true grounds and reasons of the whole Christian faith and life are plainly and fully demonstrated, to which are added, some animadversions upon Dr. Trapp's late reply ebook version of An appeal to all that doubt, or disbelieve the truths of the Gospel: whether they be Deists, Arians, Socinians, or nominal Christians, in which the true grounds and reasons of the whole Christian faith and life are plainly and fully demonstrated, to which are added, some animadversions upon Dr. Trapp's late reply

Subjects

kind | kind | Theology -- Miscellaneous Christian texts -- English | Theology -- Miscellaneous Christian texts -- English | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Don Fowler Lecture 2016: Interpretation and the Metaphor of Authority

Description

The 2016 Don Fowler Memorial Lecture, delivered by Professor Alison Sharrock of the University of Manchester. The Don Fowler Memorial Lecture Series was founded in 2000 in in memory of former Classics Fellow of Jesus, Don Paul Fowler, who died in 1999 at the age of 47. The annual lecture series in his name, hosted by Jesus College and inaugurated by a lecture delivered in May 2001 by Professor Stephen Hinds of the University of Washington, has established itself as the foremost public lecture series on Latin literature worldwide. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

classical literature | authorship | interpretation | readership | intertextuality | textual criticism | classical literature | authorship | interpretation | readership | intertextuality | textual criticism | 2016-05-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT) 21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate. This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | anthropological theory | anthropological theory | anthropological method | anthropological method | frameworks | frameworks | analysis | analysis | integration | integration | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | classic texts | classic texts | contemporary critiques | contemporary critiques | analyses of texts | analyses of texts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response. Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | novel | short story | short story | the city in literature | the city in literature | structure | structure | narrative voice | narrative voice | character development | character development | novelistic experimentation | novelistic experimentation | historical context | historical context | political context | political context | reader response | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT) 21G.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | English | second | second | language | language | ESL | ESL | listening | listening | comprehension | comprehension | oral | oral | skills | skills | pronunciation | pronunciation | common expressions | common expressions | gambits | gambits | idioms | idioms | formal | formal | informal | informal | contexts | contexts | 21F.223 | 21F.223 | 21F.224 | 21F.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT) 21A.110 Anthropological Theory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate. This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | anthropological theory | anthropological theory | anthropological method | anthropological method | frameworks | frameworks | analysis | analysis | integration | integration | cultural anthropology | cultural anthropology | classic texts | classic texts | contemporary critiques | contemporary critiques | analyses of texts | analyses of texts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.837 Computer Graphics (MIT) 6.837 Computer Graphics (MIT)

Description

6.837 offers an introduction to computer graphics hardware, algorithms, and software. Topics include: line generators, affine transformations, line and polygon clipping, splines, interactive techniques, perspective projection, solid modeling, hidden surface algorithms, lighting models, shading, and animation. Substantial programming experience is required. This course is worth 6 Engineering Design Points. 6.837 offers an introduction to computer graphics hardware, algorithms, and software. Topics include: line generators, affine transformations, line and polygon clipping, splines, interactive techniques, perspective projection, solid modeling, hidden surface algorithms, lighting models, shading, and animation. Substantial programming experience is required. This course is worth 6 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

data structures; algorithms; presenting data visually; programming; computer graphics; computer graphics applications; ray tracing; ray casting; transformation; hierarchy | data structures; algorithms; presenting data visually; programming; computer graphics; computer graphics applications; ray tracing; ray casting; transformation; hierarchy | data structures | data structures | algorithms | algorithms | presenting data visually | presenting data visually | programming | programming | computer graphics | computer graphics | computer graphics applications | computer graphics applications | ray tracing | ray tracing | ray casting | ray casting | transformation | transformation | hierarchy | hierarchy | illumination | illumination | shading | shading | acceleration structures | acceleration structures | animation | animation | image-based rendering | image-based rendering | curves | curves | surfaces | surfaces | key frames | key frames | perspective | perspective | rasterization | rasterization | clipping | clipping | visibility | visibility | rendering | rendering | radiosity | radiosity | colors | colors | altialiasing | altialiasing | texture mapping | texture mapping | procedural textures | procedural textures | shadows | shadows | graphics hardware | graphics hardware

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.011 Introduction to Western Music (MIT) 21M.011 Introduction to Western Music (MIT)

Description

This course gives a broad overview of Western music from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, with emphasis on late baroque, classical, romantic, and modernist styles (1700-1910). It is also meant to enhance students' musical experience by developing listening skills and an understanding of diverse forms and genres. Major composers and their works will be placed in social and cultural contexts. Weekly lectures feature demonstrations by professional performers, and introduce topics to be discussed in sections. The focus of the course is on the weekly listening and reading assignments. This course gives a broad overview of Western music from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, with emphasis on late baroque, classical, romantic, and modernist styles (1700-1910). It is also meant to enhance students' musical experience by developing listening skills and an understanding of diverse forms and genres. Major composers and their works will be placed in social and cultural contexts. Weekly lectures feature demonstrations by professional performers, and introduce topics to be discussed in sections. The focus of the course is on the weekly listening and reading assignments.

Subjects

western music | western music | baroque music | baroque music | classical music | classical music | romantic music | romantic music | Bach | Bach | modernist music | modernist music | listening skills | listening skills | social context of music | social context of music | cultural context of music | cultural context of music | major composers | major composers | Haydn | Haydn | Mozart | Mozart | concerto | concerto | opera | opera | Beethoven | Beethoven | Vivaldi | Vivaldi | Handel | Handel | Schubert | Schubert | Chopin | Chopin | jazz | jazz

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT) 21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT)

Description

This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance. This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance.

Subjects

Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories | Design theories | textual analysis | textual analysis | script analysis | script analysis | technical skills | technical skills | rendering | rendering | presentation | presentation | historical research | historical research | performance | performance | Lysistrata | Lysistrata | Aristophanes | Aristophanes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Out of Context: A Course on Computer Systems That Adapt To, and Learn From, Context (MIT) MAS.963 Out of Context: A Course on Computer Systems That Adapt To, and Learn From, Context (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, we are realizing that to make computer systems more intelligent and responsive to users, we will have to make them more sensitive to context. Traditional hardware and software design overlooks context because it conceptualizes systems as input-output functions. Systems take input explicitly given to them by a human, act upon that input alone and produce explicit output. But this view is too restrictive. Smart computers, intelligent agent software, and digital devices of the future will also have to operate on data that they observe or gather for themselves. They may have to sense their environment, decide which aspects of a situation are really important, and infer the user's intention from concrete actions. The system's actions may be dependent on time, place, or the histo Increasingly, we are realizing that to make computer systems more intelligent and responsive to users, we will have to make them more sensitive to context. Traditional hardware and software design overlooks context because it conceptualizes systems as input-output functions. Systems take input explicitly given to them by a human, act upon that input alone and produce explicit output. But this view is too restrictive. Smart computers, intelligent agent software, and digital devices of the future will also have to operate on data that they observe or gather for themselves. They may have to sense their environment, decide which aspects of a situation are really important, and infer the user's intention from concrete actions. The system's actions may be dependent on time, place, or the histo

Subjects

omputer systems | omputer systems | computer systems | computer systems | input | input | context | context | computer systems that adapt | computer systems that adapt | smart computers | smart computers | intelligent agent software | intelligent agent software | digital devices of the future | digital devices of the future | context-aware application | context-aware application | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

Formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. Applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers. Formal theories of context-dependency, presupposition, implicature, context-change, focus and topic. Special emphasis on the division of labor between semantics and pragmatics. Applications to the analysis of quantification, definiteness, presupposition projection, conditionals and modality, anaphora, questions and answers.

Subjects

context-dependency | context-dependency | presupposition | presupposition | implicature | implicature | context-change | context-change | focus | focus | topic | topic | semantics | semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | quantification | quantification | definiteness | definiteness | presupposition projection | presupposition projection | conditionals | conditionals | modality | modality | anaphora | anaphora | questions | questions | answers | answers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Copyright Training for College Lecturers - A short practical online course

Description

Jisc Legal has produced a ‘need to know’ online training course in copyright law – designed to bring college staff and those supporting college staff up to speed on legally using other people’s materials in teaching and learning. It is a standalone learning module which takes about an hour to complete and consists of some video, some audio segments, some animations and some text pages. It is available to Further Education institutions in the UK to train lecture staff on the proper way to use other people’s work in their own work.

Subjects

copyright lecturer further education institutions learning online course staff development training preparing | compiling and delivering learning content to learners | ownership in the context of learning materials | making copies of and digitising images | short practical online course | music and text materials particularly for uploading to virtual learning environments | video | copyright licences in the context of learning materials | altering and adapting materials lawfully | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | many theatre artists | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre architecture | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | tiring house | realistic theatre | scene design | staging practices | female playwrights | crisis drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Childhood HIV Childhood HIV

Description

Content Type:  Resource Childhood HIV enables nurses and doctors to care for children with HIV infection. It covers an introduction to HIV in children, the clinical and immunological diagnosis of HIV infection, management of children with and without antiretroviral treatment, antiretroviral drugs, opportunistic infections and end-of-life care.   Editor: Dave Woods   Organization: EBW Healthcare Content Type:  Resource Childhood HIV enables nurses and doctors to care for children with HIV infection. It covers an introduction to HIV in children, the clinical and immunological diagnosis of HIV infection, management of children with and without antiretroviral treatment, antiretroviral drugs, opportunistic infections and end-of-life care.   Editor: Dave Woods   Organization: EBW Healthcare

Subjects

africaoer | africaoer | antiretroviral drugs | antiretroviral drugs | antiretroviral treatment | antiretroviral treatment | Children | Children | counselling | counselling | ebwhealthcare | ebwhealthcare | healthoer | healthoer | healthoernetwork | healthoernetwork | hiv | hiv | HIV in children | HIV in children | HIV infection | HIV infection | immune function | immune function | immunological diagnosis | immunological diagnosis | open textbooks | open textbooks | pallative care | pallative care | Pneumocystis pneumonia | Pneumocystis pneumonia | side effects | side effects | terminal care | terminal care | Tuberculosis | Tuberculosis

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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Silvia; or, the country burial. An opera: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Lincoln's-Inn Fields. With the musick prefix'd to each song. Silvia; or, the country burial. An opera: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Lincoln's-Inn Fields. With the musick prefix'd to each song.

Description

ebook version of Silvia; or, the country burial. An opera: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Lincoln's-Inn Fields. With the musick prefix'd to each song. ebook version of Silvia; or, the country burial. An opera: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in Lincoln's-Inn Fields. With the musick prefix'd to each song.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Enthusiasm: a poem. In two parts. By Mr. Jerningham Enthusiasm: a poem. In two parts. By Mr. Jerningham

Description

ebook version of Enthusiasm: a poem. In two parts. By Mr. Jerningham ebook version of Enthusiasm: a poem. In two parts. By Mr. Jerningham

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hermione, or the orphan sisters: A novel. In four volumes. ... [pt.2] Hermione, or the orphan sisters: A novel. In four volumes. ... [pt.2]

Description

ebook version of Hermione, or the orphan sisters: A novel. In four volumes. ... [pt.2] ebook version of Hermione, or the orphan sisters: A novel. In four volumes. ... [pt.2]

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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