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18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT) 18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory. Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | Renormalization group equation | classical | classical | field | field | theory | theory | Feynman | Feynman | diagrams | diagrams | free | free | quantum | quantum | theories | theories | local | local | operators | operators | product | product | expansion | expansion | perturbative | perturbative | renormalization | renormalization | group | group | equations | equations | functional | functional | function | function | intergrals | intergrals | operator | operator | QFT | QFT | string | string | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | geometric | geometric | algebraic | algebraic | topology | topology | number | number | 0-dimensional | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supergeometry | supersymmetry | supersymmetry | conformal | conformal | stationary | stationary | phase | phase | formula | formula | calculus | calculus | combinatorics | combinatorics | matrix | matrix | mechanics | mechanics | lagrangians | lagrangians | hamiltons | hamiltons | least | least | action | action | principle | principle | limits | limits | formalism | formalism | Feynman-Kac | Feynman-Kac | current | current | charges | charges | Noether?s | Noether?s | theorem | theorem | path | path | integral | integral | approach | approach | divergences | divergences | functional integrals | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | renormalization theory | local operators | local operators | operator product expansion | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | mathematical language | string theory | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | number theory | number theory

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed. This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed.

Subjects

Meaning and reference | Meaning and reference | empiricist theories | empiricist theories | psychological theories | psychological theories | truth-conditional theories | truth-conditional theories | pretense and attitude ascriptions | pretense and attitude ascriptions | hidden indexical theory | hidden indexical theory | implicature theory | implicature theory | pragmatic theory | pragmatic theory

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | assessment | assessment | infrastructure | infrastructure | housing | housing | energy | energy | environment | environment | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.996A Simplicity Theory (MIT) 18.996A Simplicity Theory (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced topics course in model theory whose main theme is simple theories. We treat simple theories in the framework of compact abstract theories, which is more general than that of first order theories. We cover the basic properties of independence (i.e., non-dividing) in simple theories, the characterization of simple theories by the existence of a notion of independence, and hyperimaginary canonical bases. This is an advanced topics course in model theory whose main theme is simple theories. We treat simple theories in the framework of compact abstract theories, which is more general than that of first order theories. We cover the basic properties of independence (i.e., non-dividing) in simple theories, the characterization of simple theories by the existence of a notion of independence, and hyperimaginary canonical bases.

Subjects

universal domains | universal domains | compact abstract theories | compact abstract theories | indiscernibility | indiscernibility | indiscernible sequences | indiscernible sequences | dividing | dividing | simplicity | simplicity | independence | independence | Lascar strong types | Lascar strong types | independence theorem | independence theorem | hyperimaginaries | hyperimaginaries | canonical bases | canonical bases | supersimplicity | supersimplicity | Lascar inequalities | Lascar inequalities | stability | stability | stable theories | stable theories | generic automorphism | generic automorphism | type-definable groups | type-definable groups | lovely pairs | lovely pairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT) 21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT)

Description

This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance. This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance.

Subjects

Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories | Design theories | textual analysis | textual analysis | script analysis | script analysis | technical skills | technical skills | rendering | rendering | presentation | presentation | historical research | historical research | performance | performance | Lysistrata | Lysistrata | Aristophanes | Aristophanes

License

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DP4A35 Philosophy D: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Description

This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of classical and contemporary theories of morality. It introduces you to the philosophical study of ethics and metaethics and develops your skills in applying these concepts to a contemporary ethical issue.

Subjects

DP4A 35 | nominative theories of morality | meta-ethical theories of morality | contemporary ethical theories | Plato | Aristotle | Immanuel Kant | utilitarians | applied ethics | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | D: Humanities (History/Archaeology/Religious Studies/Philosophy) | SCQF Level 8

License

Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | classical | field | theory | Feynman | diagrams | free | quantum | theories | local | operators | product | expansion | perturbative | renormalization | group | equations | functional | function | intergrals | operator | QFT | string | physics | mathematics | geometry | geometric | algebraic | topology | number | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supersymmetry | conformal | stationary | phase | formula | calculus | combinatorics | matrix | mechanics | lagrangians | hamiltons | least | action | principle | limits | formalism | Feynman-Kac | current | charges | Noether?s | theorem | path | integral | approach | divergences | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | local operators | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed.

Subjects

Meaning and reference | empiricist theories | psychological theories | truth-conditional theories | pretense and attitude ascriptions | hidden indexical theory | implicature theory | pragmatic theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | nternational trade | nternational trade | foreign investment | foreign investment | commercial policy | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | wage inequality | external scale economics | external scale economics | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | WTO | WTO | regionalism | regionalism | multilateralism | multilateralism

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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors.

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678 | Political science | Political science | theories | theories

License

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17.869 Political Science Scope and Methods (MIT) 17.869 Political Science Scope and Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to a variety of empirical research methods used by political scientists. The primary aims of the course are to make you a more sophisticated consumer of diverse empirical research and to allow you to conduct sophisticated independent work in your junior and senior years. This is not a course in data analysis. Rather, it is a course on how to approach political science research. This course is designed to provide an introduction to a variety of empirical research methods used by political scientists. The primary aims of the course are to make you a more sophisticated consumer of diverse empirical research and to allow you to conduct sophisticated independent work in your junior and senior years. This is not a course in data analysis. Rather, it is a course on how to approach political science research.

Subjects

political science | political science | empirical research | empirical research | scientific method | scientific method | research design | research design | models | models | samping | samping | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | measurement | measurement | ethics | ethics | empirical | empirical | research | research | scientific | scientific | methods | methods | statistics | statistics | statistical | statistical | analysis | analysis | political | political | politics | politics | science | science | design | design | sampling | sampling | theoretical | theoretical | observation | observation | data | data | case studies | case studies | cases | cases | empirical research methods | empirical research methods | political scientists | political scientists | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | theoretical analysis | theoretical analysis | research projects | research projects | department faculty | department faculty | inference | inference | writing | writing | revision | revision | oral presentations | oral presentations | experimental method | experimental method | theories | theories | political implications | political implications

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Mechanics of Fields (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Mechanics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories. This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems | correlation functions | correlation functions | and scaling theory | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory

License

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site. This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories

License

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8.08 Statistical Physics II (MIT) 8.08 Statistical Physics II (MIT)

Description

Probability distributions for classical and quantum systems. Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical partition-functions and associated thermodynamic potentials. Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems. Applications: non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases; mean field theories for real gases, binary mixtures, magnetic systems, polymer solutions; phase and reaction equilibria, critical phenomena. Fluctuations, correlation functions and susceptibilities, and Kubo formulae. Evolution of distribution functions: Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations. Probability distributions for classical and quantum systems. Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical partition-functions and associated thermodynamic potentials. Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems. Applications: non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases; mean field theories for real gases, binary mixtures, magnetic systems, polymer solutions; phase and reaction equilibria, critical phenomena. Fluctuations, correlation functions and susceptibilities, and Kubo formulae. Evolution of distribution functions: Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations.

Subjects

Probability distributions | Probability distributions | quantum systems | quantum systems | Microcanonical | Microcanonical | canonical | canonical | grand canonical partition-functions | grand canonical partition-functions | thermodynamic potentials | thermodynamic potentials | Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems | Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems | non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases | non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases | mean field theories for real gases | mean field theories for real gases | binary mixtures | binary mixtures | magnetic systems | magnetic systems | polymer solutions | polymer solutions | phase and reaction equilibria | phase and reaction equilibria | critical phenomena | critical phenomena | Fluctuations | Fluctuations | correlation functions and susceptibilities | correlation functions and susceptibilities | Kubo formulae | Kubo formulae | Evolution of distribution functions | Evolution of distribution functions | Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations | Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations | correlation functions | correlation functions | susceptibilities | susceptibilities

License

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

Topics from modern statistical mechanics are explored in 8.334, Statistical Mechanics II, including:The hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality, correlation functions, and scaling theory.The renormalization approach to collective phenomena.Integrable models. Quantum phase transitions. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are explored in 8.334, Statistical Mechanics II, including:The hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality, correlation functions, and scaling theory.The renormalization approach to collective phenomena.Integrable models. Quantum phase transitions.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems

License

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics. Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories | nuclear reactions | nuclear reactions

License

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8.324 Quantum Field Theory II (MIT) 8.324 Quantum Field Theory II (MIT)

Description

8.324 is the second term of the quantum field theory trimester sequence. Develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics: Functional path integrals. Renormalization and renormalization group. Quantization of nonabelian gauge theories. BRST symmetry. Renormalization and symmetry breaking. Critical exponents and scalar field theory. Perturbation theory anomalies. 8.324 is the second term of the quantum field theory trimester sequence. Develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics: Functional path integrals. Renormalization and renormalization group. Quantization of nonabelian gauge theories. BRST symmetry. Renormalization and symmetry breaking. Critical exponents and scalar field theory. Perturbation theory anomalies.

Subjects

Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nonabelian gauge theories | nonabelian gauge theories | BRST symmetry | BRST symmetry | Nonabelian Gauge Theories | Nonabelian Gauge Theories | Perturbation Theory Anomalies | Perturbation Theory Anomalies | Renormalization | Renormalization | Symmetry Breaking | Symmetry Breaking | Critical Exponents | Critical Exponents | Scalar Field Theory | Scalar Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory

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