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SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT) SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Lesotho | Lesotho | Nicaragua | Nicaragua | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | AIDS | AIDS | solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT) SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT)

Description

D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country. D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country.

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | Haiti | Haiti | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Samoa | Samoa | Lesotho | Lesotho | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | cooking | cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | medical ethics | medical ethics | infant mortality | infant mortality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.910 Reading Seminar in Social Science: International Political Economy (MIT) 17.910 Reading Seminar in Social Science: International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This course examines the politics of international economic relations. We begin with a discussion of the analytical "lenses" through which we can view the global economy. We then examine the politics of trade policy, multinational corporations, and international monetary and financial relations. We will also examine third-world development, communist transition, and the debate over "globalization." Finally we will explore the fight against terrorist financing and money laundering, the proper role of international financial institutions (including the IMF), and the impact of the global economy on the ability of governments to make policy within their own borders. This course examines the politics of international economic relations. We begin with a discussion of the analytical "lenses" through which we can view the global economy. We then examine the politics of trade policy, multinational corporations, and international monetary and financial relations. We will also examine third-world development, communist transition, and the debate over "globalization." Finally we will explore the fight against terrorist financing and money laundering, the proper role of international financial institutions (including the IMF), and the impact of the global economy on the ability of governments to make policy within their own borders.

Subjects

Markets | Markets | Multilateral Trade System | Multilateral Trade System | trade policy | trade policy | trade | trade | development | development | Foreign Direct Investment | Foreign Direct Investment | Multinational Corporation | Multinational Corporation | International Monetary System | International Monetary System | exchange rate | exchange rate | politics | politics | politicay economy | politicay economy | International Financial Institutions | International Financial Institutions | International Finance and Development | International Finance and Development | Economies in Transition | Economies in Transition | Positive and Negative Externalities of Globalization | Positive and Negative Externalities of Globalization | global economy | global economy | financial flows | financial flows | internationalization of production | internationalization of production | third world development | third world development | communist transition | communist transition | terroist financing | terroist financing | money laundering | money laundering | IMF | IMF

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT) 11.491J Economic Development, Policy Analysis, and Industrialization (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors. This class analyzes the theoretical and historical reasons why governments in latecomer countries have intervened with a wide array of policies to foster industrial development at various turning points: the initiation of industrial activity; the diversification of the industrial base; the restructuring of major industrial institutions; and the entry into high-technology sectors.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | technological capabilities | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | world technological frontier | innovation | innovation | new products | new products | production engineering | production engineering | project execution | project execution | borrowed technology | borrowed technology | third world development | third world development | industrialization | industrialization | pre WWII | pre WWII | post WWII | post WWII | underdevelopment | underdevelopment | lendingm | lendingm | government regulation | government regulation | 11.491 | 11.491 | 17.176 | 17.176

License

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT)

Description

Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré, Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré,

Subjects

developing world | developing world | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | industrialization | industrialization | economic development | economic development | human rights | human rights | global human rights | global human rights | global issues | global issues | global development | global development | literary perspective | literary perspective | Jamaica Kincaid | Jamaica Kincaid | JG Ballard | JG Ballard | John le Carre | John le Carre | Rohinton Mistry | Rohinton Mistry | World Bank | World Bank | National Geographic | National Geographic

License

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HST.939 Designing and Sustaining Technology Innovation for Global Health Practice (MIT) HST.939 Designing and Sustaining Technology Innovation for Global Health Practice (MIT)

Description

Innovation in global health practice requires leaders who are trained to think and act like entrepreneurs. Whether at a hospital bedside or in a remote village, global healthcare leaders must understand both the business of running a social venture as well as how to plan for and provide access to life saving medicines and essential health services. Each week, the course features a lecture and skills-based tutorial session led by industry, non-profit foundation, technology, and academic leaders to think outside the box in tackling and solving problems in innovation for global health practice through the rationale design of technology and service solutions. The lectures provide the foundation for faculty-mentored pilot project from MOH, students, or non-profit sponsors that may involve creat Innovation in global health practice requires leaders who are trained to think and act like entrepreneurs. Whether at a hospital bedside or in a remote village, global healthcare leaders must understand both the business of running a social venture as well as how to plan for and provide access to life saving medicines and essential health services. Each week, the course features a lecture and skills-based tutorial session led by industry, non-profit foundation, technology, and academic leaders to think outside the box in tackling and solving problems in innovation for global health practice through the rationale design of technology and service solutions. The lectures provide the foundation for faculty-mentored pilot project from MOH, students, or non-profit sponsors that may involve creat

Subjects

global health | global health | developing countries | developing countries | third world | third world | Africa | Africa | underserved population | underserved population | rural medicine | rural medicine | health technology | health technology | health ventures | health ventures | medical technology | medical technology | medical innovation | medical innovation | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | non-profit | non-profit | pharmaceutical design | pharmaceutical design | rapid diagnostic test | rapid diagnostic test | systems design | systems design | student projects | student projects | field work | field work | mentor program | mentor program | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | health economics | health economics | disease management | disease management | drug distribution | drug distribution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT) EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop

Subjects

sustainable energy | sustainable energy | renewable energy | renewable energy | green energy | green energy | sustainable development | sustainable development | third world | third world | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | solar power | solar power | wind power | wind power | micro-hydro power | micro-hydro power | design | design | co-creation | co-creation | Nicaragua | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.715 D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (MIT) EC.715 D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (MIT)

Description

In the trilogy of D-Lab courses, D-Lab: Dissemination focuses on disseminating innovations among underserved communities, especially in developing countries. Students acquire skills related to building partnerships and piloting, financing, implementing, and scaling-up a selected innovation for the common good. The course is structured around MIT and outside competitions. Teams develop an idea, project or (social) business plan that is "ready to roll" by term's end. Course includes an on-line forum discussion board, student-led case studies and a final proposal or business plan for realizing your dream innovation. In the trilogy of D-Lab courses, D-Lab: Dissemination focuses on disseminating innovations among underserved communities, especially in developing countries. Students acquire skills related to building partnerships and piloting, financing, implementing, and scaling-up a selected innovation for the common good. The course is structured around MIT and outside competitions. Teams develop an idea, project or (social) business plan that is "ready to roll" by term's end. Course includes an on-line forum discussion board, student-led case studies and a final proposal or business plan for realizing your dream innovation.

Subjects

development | development | innovation | innovation | technology implementation | technology implementation | third world | third world | developing nations | developing nations | social business plan | social business plan | project development | project development | poverty | poverty | hygiene | hygiene | health | health

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT) EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | engineering | engineering | local production | local production | third world | third world | disabled | disabled | disability | disability | assistive technology | assistive technology | human power | human power | Africa | Africa | Tanzania | Tanzania | Zambia | Zambia | Kenya | Kenya | handicap | handicap | handicapped | handicapped | poverty | poverty | rural | rural | discrimination | discrimination | orthopedic | orthopedic | mobility | mobility | tricycle | tricycle | handcycle | handcycle | product design | product design | business plan | business plan | ergonomics | ergonomics | manufacturing | manufacturing | stakeholder | stakeholder | service learning | service learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.720J D-Lab II: Design (MIT) EC.720J D-Lab II: Design (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Design addresses problems faced by undeserved communities with a focus on design, experimentation, and prototyping processes. Particular attention is placed on constraints faced when designing for developing countries. Multidisciplinary teams work on semester-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Topics covered include design for affordability, design for manufacture, sustainability, and strategies for working effectively with community partners and customers. Students may continue projects begun in EC.701J D-Lab I: Development. D-Lab: Design addresses problems faced by undeserved communities with a focus on design, experimentation, and prototyping processes. Particular attention is placed on constraints faced when designing for developing countries. Multidisciplinary teams work on semester-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Topics covered include design for affordability, design for manufacture, sustainability, and strategies for working effectively with community partners and customers. Students may continue projects begun in EC.701J D-Lab I: Development.

Subjects

EC.720 | EC.720 | 2.722 | 2.722 | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | participatory development | participatory development | co-creation | co-creation | poverty | poverty | product design | product design | third world | third world | cookstove | cookstove | washing machine | washing machine

License

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT) EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.025 | 11.472 | 11.472 | development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | China | China | India | India | Rwanda | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Tanzania | Africa | Africa | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | stove | stove | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | World Bank | World Bank | NGO | NGO | United Nations | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4D | ICT4C | ICT4C | microfinance | microfinance | micro-finance | micro-finance | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | wind power | wind power | solar power | solar power | biomass | biomass | biodiesel | biodiesel | biogas | biogas | agriculture | agriculture | farming | farming | food | food | green revolution | green revolution | millenium development goals | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.722 Special Topics at Edgerton Center:Developing World Prosthetics (MIT) EC.722 Special Topics at Edgerton Center:Developing World Prosthetics (MIT)

Description

D-Lab World Prosthetics is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jaipur Foot Organization to improve the design, manufacture, and distribution of rehabilitation devices in the developing world. The course welcomes individuals interested in physical rehabilitation to work on multidisciplinary teams of students with bioengineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and medical or pre-medical backgrounds. Students will learn about the basics of human walking, different types of gait disabilities, as well as the technologies that seek to address those disabilities. Patient perspectives and current research areas are presented. Lecture topics focus on lower-limb disabilities, including polio and above-knee and below-knee amputation, and will cover bot D-Lab World Prosthetics is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jaipur Foot Organization to improve the design, manufacture, and distribution of rehabilitation devices in the developing world. The course welcomes individuals interested in physical rehabilitation to work on multidisciplinary teams of students with bioengineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and medical or pre-medical backgrounds. Students will learn about the basics of human walking, different types of gait disabilities, as well as the technologies that seek to address those disabilities. Patient perspectives and current research areas are presented. Lecture topics focus on lower-limb disabilities, including polio and above-knee and below-knee amputation, and will cover bot

Subjects

jaipur foot | jaipur foot | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | amputation | amputation | amputee | amputee | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | orthotics | orthotics | prosthesis | prosthesis | prosthetic technology | prosthetic technology | pediatric extendable prosthetic | pediatric extendable prosthetic | cosmetic shell | cosmetic shell | vacuum casting | vacuum casting

License

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.710 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) EC.710 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.775 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international development.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate

Subjects

sustainable energy | renewable energy | green energy | sustainable development | third world | appropriate technology | solar power | wind power | micro-hydro power | design | co-creation | Nicaragua

License

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SP.784 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects on topics such as hardware design, manufacturing optimi

Subjects

appropriate technology | engineering | local production | third world | disabled | disability | assistive technology | human power | Africa | Tanzania | Zambia | Kenya | handicap | handicapped | poverty | rural | discrimination | orthopedic | mobility | tricycle | handcycle | product design | business plan | ergonomics | manufacturing | stakeholder | service learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.723 D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (MIT)

Description

In the trilogy of D-Lab courses, D-Lab: Dissemination focuses on disseminating innovations among underserved communities, especially in developing countries. Students acquire skills related to building partnerships and piloting, financing, implementing, and scaling-up a selected innovation for the common good. The course is structured around MIT and outside competitions. Teams develop an idea, project or (social) business plan that is "ready to roll" by term's end. Course includes an on-line forum discussion board, student-led case studies and a final proposal or business plan for realizing your dream innovation.

Subjects

development | innovation | technology implementation | third world | developing nations | social business plan | project development | poverty | hygiene | health

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | society | geography | america | europe | asia | africa | third worrld | development | contemporary culture | religion | politics | youth | developing nation | first world | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | religious movements | social movements | political movements | pop | popular music | political cartoons | Japan | popular culture | world hip-hop | rap | media power | consumer activism | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.722J D-Lab II: Design (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Design addresses problems faced by undeserved communities with a focus on design, experimentation, and prototyping processes. Particular attention is placed on constraints faced when designing for developing countries. Multidisciplinary teams work on semester-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Topics covered include design for affordability, design for manufacture, sustainability, and strategies for working effectively with community partners and customers. Students may continue projects begun in SP.721/11.025J/11.472 D-Lab Development.

Subjects

appropriate technology | sustainable development | participatory development | co-creation | poverty | product design | third world | cookstove | washing machine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.721 D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

development project | appropriate technology | sustainable development | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | China | India | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Africa | developing country | international development | third world | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | grain mill | solar energy | stove | energy | charcoal | wheelchair | water | water quality | safe water | water treatment | health | sanitation | World Bank | NGO | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4C | microfinance | micro-finance | AIDS | HIV | wind power | solar power | biomass | biodiesel | biogas | agriculture | farming | food | green revolution | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.733 Special Topics at Edgerton Center:Developing World Prosthetics (MIT)

Description

D-Lab World Prosthetics is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jaipur Foot Organization to improve the design, manufacture, and distribution of rehabilitation devices in the developing world. The course welcomes individuals interested in physical rehabilitation to work on multidisciplinary teams of students with bioengineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and medical or pre-medical backgrounds. Students will learn about the basics of human walking, different types of gait disabilities, as well as the technologies that seek to address those disabilities. Patient perspectives and current research areas are presented. Lecture topics focus on lower-limb disabilities, including polio and above-knee and below-knee amputation, and will cover bot

Subjects

jaipur foot | developing nation | third world | amputation | amputee | appropriate technology | sustainable development | co-creation | inequality | poverty | poor | medical device design | innovation | prototyping | orthotics | prosthesis | prosthetic technology | pediatric extendable prosthetic | cosmetic shell | vacuum casting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | society | geography | america | europe | asia | africa | third worrld | development | contemporary culture | religion | politics | youth | developing nation | first world | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | religious movements | social movements | political movements | pop | popular music | political cartoons | Japan | popular culture | world hip-hop | rap | media power | consumer activism | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | society | geography | america | europe | asia | africa | third worrld | development | contemporary culture | religion | politics | youth | developing nation | first world | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | religious movements | social movements | political movements | pop | popular music | political cartoons | Japan | popular culture | world hip-hop | rap | media power | consumer activism | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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