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24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Perceptual Experience (MIT) 24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Perceptual Experience (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of recent philosophy of perception. The main topics discussed are the following: the transparency of perceptual experience, disjunctivism, the content of perceptual experience, perceptual consciousness, thought ownership and thought disorders (focussing on schizophrenia), introspection, and the perception of sound. Questions raised by these topics include "In what way is imagination distinct from perception?", "Is there a perceptual relation?", "What is the view that perceptual experiences have representational content?", "In what way is introspection distinct from perception?", "What does the phenomenon of 'thought insertion' show about the ownership of thoughts?", and "What is a sound?". We explore thes This course is a survey of recent philosophy of perception. The main topics discussed are the following: the transparency of perceptual experience, disjunctivism, the content of perceptual experience, perceptual consciousness, thought ownership and thought disorders (focussing on schizophrenia), introspection, and the perception of sound. Questions raised by these topics include "In what way is imagination distinct from perception?", "Is there a perceptual relation?", "What is the view that perceptual experiences have representational content?", "In what way is introspection distinct from perception?", "What does the phenomenon of 'thought insertion' show about the ownership of thoughts?", and "What is a sound?". We explore thes

Subjects

philosophy of perception | philosophy of perception | transparency of experience | transparency of experience | consciousness | consciousness | sensory awareness | sensory awareness | content of visual experience | content of visual experience | thought ownership | thought ownership | thought disorders | thought disorders | schizophrenia | schizophrenia | introspection | introspection | sound | sound

License

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving. This undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to cognitive processes. The broad range of topics covers each of the areas in the field of cognition, and presents the current thinking in this discipline. As an introduction to human information processing and learning, the topics include the nature of mental representation and processing, the architecture of memory, pattern recognition, attention, imagery and mental codes, concepts and prototypes, reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | cognitive processes | cognitive processes | cognition | cognition | the mind | the mind | object recognition | object recognition | attention | attention | memory | memory | associative memory | associative memory | learning | learning | implicit memory | implicit memory | conceptual short term memory | conceptual short term memory | working memory | working memory | language | language | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | visual knowledge | visual knowledge | mental codes | mental codes | judgement | judgement | reasoning | reasoning | problem-solving | problem-solving | conscious thought | conscious thought | unconscious thought | unconscious thought

License

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

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Political ideas in revolution Political ideas in revolution

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11001 | module code M11001 | history of western political thought | history of western political thought | module code M11151 | module code M11151 | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Niccolo Machiavelli | Niccolo Machiavelli | Thomas Hobbes | Thomas Hobbes | John Locke | John Locke | ancient and modern political thought and practices | ancient and modern political thought and practices

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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SP.601J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminist political thought | feminist political thought | equality | equality | suffrage | | suffrage | | radical feminism | radical feminism | psychoanalysis | psychoanalysis | power | power | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | pornography | pornography | identity | identity | global feminism | global feminism | militarism | militarism | welfare state | welfare state

License

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations. Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT) 9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods. Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | Language | Language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods. | neural imaging methods. | 9.59 | 9.59 | 24.905 | 24.905

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

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24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT) 24.729 Topics in Philosophy of Language: Modeling Representation (MIT)

Description

The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether. The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether.

Subjects

radical interpretation | radical interpretation | mathematical truth | mathematical truth | self-location | self-location | degrees of belief | degrees of belief | incoherent belief | incoherent belief | language of thought | language of thought | representation system | representation system | modeling representation | modeling representation | intentionality | intentionality | philosophy of language | philosophy of language | Putnam's paradox | Putnam's paradox | semantics | semantics | logical omniscience | logical omniscience | epistemology | epistemology | knowledge argument | knowledge argument

License

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

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21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

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Introduction to Ethics: Judgment, Motivation, Action

Description

Paula Boddington gives a talk introducing the concept of ethics in business as part of the Said Business School's Seminar - The ethics of reputation and the reputation of ethics: oxymoron or research subject? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

helex | business | judgment | capitalism | thought | action | oxford | ethics | law | corporate | helex | business | judgment | capitalism | thought | action | oxford | ethics | law | corporate

License

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments. This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | psychology | psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | social behavior | social behavior | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. 9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | human perception | human perception | cognition | cognition | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | single factor design | single factor design | factorial design | factorial design | matlab | matlab | correlational studies | correlational studies | ethics in research | ethics in research | visual cognition | visual cognition | thought | thought | psychology and cognitive science | psychology and cognitive science | information processing | information processing | organization of visual cognitive abilities. | organization of visual cognitive abilities.

License

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class. In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics

License

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT) 21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course "The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | scientific thought | scientific thought | scientific method | scientific method | mathematics | mathematics | chance | chance | risk | risk | statistics | statistics | history of science | history of science | quantitative measurement | quantitative measurement | chaos | chaos | uncertainty | uncertainty | induction | induction | deduction | deduction | inference | inference | luck | luck | gambling | gambling | cause and effect | cause and effect | games of chance | games of chance | fate | fate | prediction | prediction | rationality | rationality | decision making | decision making | religion | religion | randomness | randomness | knowledge | knowledge | fact | fact | human nature | human nature | mind | mind | senses | senses | intelligence | intelligence | metaphor | metaphor | Darwinism | Darwinism

License

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9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

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9.402 Language and Thought (MIT) 9.402 Language and Thought (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the many interrelationships between language and thought. Do people who speak different languages think differently? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently in different languages? Are some thoughts unthinkable without language? Subject examines the many interrelationships between language and thought. Do people who speak different languages think differently? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently in different languages? Are some thoughts unthinkable without language?

Subjects

language | language | thought | thought | polyglots | polyglots | cognitive | cognitive | developmental | developmental | cultural psychology | cultural psychology | linguistics | linguistics | anthropology | anthropology | ethology | ethology

License

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | artificial | intelligence | feedback | mechanism | speculative | thought | intelligent | agency | systems | design | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | history | conscious | selection | chance | unconscious | philosophy | human | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | self-guiding | self-sustaining | nature | unintelligent | mechanical | argument | evolution | creation | creationism | ethics | ethical | values | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | model | existence | objects | designer | purpose | literary texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | intellectual history | life | planet | natural history | material universe | theory of natural selection | argument from design | organisms | human design | conscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.98 Language and Mind (MIT) 9.98 Language and Mind (MIT)

Description

This course will address some fundamental questions regarding human language: (1) how language is represented in our minds; (2) how language is acquired by children; (3) how language is processed by adults; (4) the relationship between language and thought; (5) exploring how language is represented and processed using brain imaging methods; and (6) computational modeling of human language acquisition and processing. This course will address some fundamental questions regarding human language: (1) how language is represented in our minds; (2) how language is acquired by children; (3) how language is processed by adults; (4) the relationship between language and thought; (5) exploring how language is represented and processed using brain imaging methods; and (6) computational modeling of human language acquisition and processing.

Subjects

human language | human language | representation | representation | acquisition | acquisition | children | children | adults | adults | language | language | thought | thought | imaging | imaging | computational modeling | computational modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.601J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminist political thought | feminist political thought | equality | equality | suffrage | | suffrage | | radical feminism | radical feminism | psychoanalysis | psychoanalysis | power | power | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | pornography | pornography | identity | identity | global feminism | global feminism | militarism | militarism | welfare state | welfare state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | artificial | intelligence | feedback | mechanism | speculative | thought | intelligent | agency | systems | design | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | history | conscious | selection | chance | unconscious | philosophy | human | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | self-guiding | self-sustaining | nature | unintelligent | mechanical | argument | evolution | creation | creationism | ethics | ethical | values | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | model | existence | objects | designer | purpose | literary texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | intellectual history | life | planet | natural history | material universe | theory of natural selection | argument from design | organisms | human design | conscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT)

Description

Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro

Subjects

poems | poems | think | think | images | images | poet | poet | lunatic | lunatic | irrational | irrational | art | art | sciences | sciences | processes of mind | processes of mind | reason | reason | mind | mind | thought | thought | British | British | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth | nineteenth | centuries | centuries | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | brain | brain | interdisciplinary course | interdisciplinary course | lyric | lyric | didactic | didactic | cognition | cognition | medicine | medicine | literary study | literary study | humanistic research | humanistic research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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