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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

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20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT) 20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | medical implants | artificial organs | artificial organs | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | matrix | matrix | biomaterials | biomaterials | protein adsorption | protein adsorption | unit cell process | unit cell process | wound healing | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | prosthesis | biodegradable | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | bioreplaceable implants | BE.441 | BE.441 | 2.79 | 2.79 | 3.96 | 3.96 | HST.522 | HST.522

License

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BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT) BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S

Subjects

Analysis | Analysis | design | design | molecular scale | molecular scale | biological systems | biological systems | biotechnology | biotechnology | biomedical engineering | biomedical engineering | molecular interactions | molecular interactions | synthetic molecules | synthetic molecules | synthesis | synthesis | processing approaches | processing approaches | cell functions | cell functions | materials science | materials science | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | drug delivery | drug delivery | biosensors | biosensors | cell-guiding surfaces | cell-guiding surfaces | 3.962J | 3.962J | BE.462 | BE.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

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BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT) BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | medical implants | artificial organs | artificial organs | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | matrix | matrix | biomaterials | biomaterials | protein adsorption | protein adsorption | unit cell process | unit cell process | wound healing | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | prosthesis | biodegradable | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | bioreplaceable implants | 2.79J | 2.79J | 3.96J | 3.96J | HST.522J | HST.522J | 2.79 | 2.79 | 3.96 | 3.96 | HST.522 | HST.522

License

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BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT) BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials (MIT)

Description

Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework. Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework.

Subjects

biological materials | biological materials | molecular structure | molecular structure | self assembly | self assembly | molecular design | molecular design | bioelectronics | bioelectronics | molecular computing | molecular computing | tissue engineering | tissue engineering

License

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20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J) (MIT) 20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (BE.462J) (MIT)

Description

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S

Subjects

Analysis | Analysis | design | design | molecular scale | molecular scale | biological systems | biological systems | biotechnology | biotechnology | biomedical engineering | biomedical engineering | molecular interactions | molecular interactions | synthetic molecules | synthetic molecules | synthesis | synthesis | processing approaches | processing approaches | cell functions | cell functions | materials science | materials science | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | drug delivery | drug delivery | biosensors | biosensors | cell-guiding surfaces | cell-guiding surfaces | BE.462J | BE.462J | BE.462 | BE.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.441J Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT) 20.441J Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological funct This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological funct

Subjects

20.441 | 20.441 | 2.79 | 2.79 | 3.96 | 3.96 | HST.522 | HST.522 | medical implants | medical implants | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | unit cell process | unit cell process | wound healing | wound healing | joint replacement | joint replacement | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | biocompatibility | biocompatibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT) 20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces. This course covers the analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces.

Subjects

biomaterials | biomaterials | biomaterial engineering | biomaterial engineering | biotechnology | biotechnology | cell-guiding surface | cell-guiding surface | molecular biomaterials | molecular biomaterials | drug release | drug release | polymers | polymers | pulsatile release | pulsatile release | polymerization | polymerization | polyer erosion | polyer erosion | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | hydrogels | hydrogels | adhesion | adhesion | migration | migration | drug diffusion | drug diffusion | molecular switches | molecular switches | molecular motors | molecular motors | nanoparticles | nanoparticles | microparticles | microparticles | vaccines | vaccines | drug targeting | drug targeting | micro carriers | micro carriers | nano carriers | nano carriers | intracellular drug delivery | intracellular drug delivery | 20.462 | 20.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.535 Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering (MIT) HST.535 Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering (MIT)

Description

The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described. The rationale for employing selected growth factors is covered and the techniques for incorporating their genes into the scaffol The principles and practice of tissue engineering (and regenerative medicine) are taught by faculty of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The principles underlying strategies for employing selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators or their genes, and mechanical loading and culture conditions, for the regeneration of tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo are addressed. Differentiated cell types and stem cells are compared and contrasted for this application, as are natural and synthetic scaffolds. Methodology for the preparation of cells and scaffolds in practice is described. The rationale for employing selected growth factors is covered and the techniques for incorporating their genes into the scaffol

Subjects

tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffold | scaffold | cell | cell | stem cell | stem cell | collagen | collagen | GAG | GAG | ECM | ECM | extracellular matrix | extracellular matrix | biomimetics | biomimetics | healing | healing | skin | skin | nerve | nerve | bone | bone | cartilage | cartilage

License

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT) 3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking is explored. Students taking the gr This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking is explored. Students taking the gr

Subjects

honeycombs | honeycombs | foams | foams | lattices | lattices | stress strain | stress strain | elasticity | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | fracture | trabecular bone | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffolds | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants | cellular structures in plants

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | 3.051 | BE.340 | 20.340

License

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT) 3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi

Subjects

honeycombs | honeycombs | foams | foams | lattices | lattices | stress strain | stress strain | elasticity | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | fracture | trabecular bone | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffolds | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants | cellular structures in plants

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) PLGA | polymer | tissue engineering | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) PLGA | polymer | tissue engineering | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering. Enlargement of a Pore.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) PLGA | polymer | tissue engineering | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. Average Pore Size 100-300 micrometre+D7, porosity estimated at 65%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) PLGA | polymer | tissue engineering | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) plga | polymer | tissue engineering | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) plga | polymer | tissue engineering | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering. Enlargement of a Pore.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. This technique is particularly useful for large defects, or where the host bed is compromised due to disease, although it is still at the research stage. Average Pore Size 350-550 micrometre, porosity estimated at 35-45%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) plga | polymer | tissue engineering | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffold for tissue engineering.

Description

The patients own cells are seeded onto the scaffold and allowed to attach and start producing new bone. The construct is implanted into the defect site, where eventually the polymer will biodegrade and be completely removed, leaving a natural autogenous bone graft. Average Pore Size 100-300 micrometre+D7, porosity estimated at 65%.

Subjects

biodegradable polymer | bone | poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) plga | polymer | tissue engineering | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | artificial organs | tissue engineering | matrix | biomaterials | protein adsorption | unit cell process | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | BE.441 | 2.79 | 3.96 | HST.522

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.Microsoft® is a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S

Subjects

Analysis | design | molecular scale | biological systems | biotechnology | biomedical engineering | molecular interactions | synthetic molecules | synthesis | processing approaches | cell functions | materials science | tissue engineering | drug delivery | biosensors | cell-guiding surfaces | 3.962J | BE.462 | 3.962

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | artificial organs | tissue engineering | matrix | biomaterials | protein adsorption | unit cell process | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | 2.79J | 3.96J | HST.522J | 2.79 | 3.96 | HST.522

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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