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Getting the dose right

Description

Too high a dose can result in toxicity and side-effects, too low a dose can cause the illness to come back and at worse develop resistance. Professor Joel Tarning is Head of Clinical Pharmacology in our MORU Unit in Bangkok, Thailand. He's working towards drug dose-optimisation using novel pharmacometric modelling approaches. He is particularly interested in antimalarial treatments for children and pregnant women. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

pharmacology | malaria | toxicity | drug resistance | pharmacology | malaria | toxicity | drug resistance

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Getting the dose right

Description

Too high a dose can result in toxicity and side-effects, too low a dose can cause the illness to come back and at worse develop resistance. Professor Joel Tarning is Head of Clinical Pharmacology in our MORU Unit in Bangkok, Thailand. He's working towards drug dose-optimisation using novel pharmacometric modelling approaches. He is particularly interested in antimalarial treatments for children and pregnant women. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

pharmacology | malaria | toxicity | drug resistance | pharmacology | malaria | toxicity | drug resistance

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

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20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT) 20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the scientific basis for the development of new drugs. The first half of the semester begins with an overview of the drug discovery process, followed by fundamental principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, and the mechanisms by which drugs cause therapeutic and toxic responses. The second half of the semester applies those principles to case studies and literature discussions of current problems with specific drugs, drug classes, and therapeutic targets. This course addresses the scientific basis for the development of new drugs. The first half of the semester begins with an overview of the drug discovery process, followed by fundamental principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, and the mechanisms by which drugs cause therapeutic and toxic responses. The second half of the semester applies those principles to case studies and literature discussions of current problems with specific drugs, drug classes, and therapeutic targets.

Subjects

drugs | drugs | medicine | medicine | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | pharmacology | pharmacology | toxicology | toxicology | drug actions | drug actions | therapeutics | therapeutics | histology | histology | pathophysiology | pathophysiology | drug therapy | drug therapy | drug transporters | drug transporters | drug metabolism | drug metabolism | drug toxicity | drug toxicity | drug development | drug development | uptake | uptake | transport | transport | case study | case study | biochemistry | biochemistry | Pharmacokinetics | Pharmacokinetics | Pharmacogenetics | Pharmacogenetics | Omeprazole | Omeprazole | antibiotics | antibiotics | Oncology | Oncology | Statins | Statins | Sarilumab | Sarilumab | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT) 10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions. This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | biocatalysis | enzymes | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | enzyme toxicity | yield | yield | enzyme instability | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | product solubility | substrate solubility | substrate solubility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT) HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin

Subjects

health care | health care | pharmacology | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | pharmacologic agents | medical | medical | pre-clinical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biophysics | biochemistry | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | physiology related to drug action | interaction | interaction | distribution | distribution | metabolism | metabolism | toxicity | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT) 20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT)

Description

This course covers the chemical and biological analysis of the metabolism and distribution of drugs, toxins and chemicals in animals and humans, and the mechanism by which they cause therapeutic and toxic responses. Metabolism and toxicity as a basis for drug development is also covered. This course covers the chemical and biological analysis of the metabolism and distribution of drugs, toxins and chemicals in animals and humans, and the mechanism by which they cause therapeutic and toxic responses. Metabolism and toxicity as a basis for drug development is also covered.

Subjects

pharmacology | pharmacology | toxicology | toxicology | drug actions | drug actions | therapeutics | therapeutics | histology | histology | pathophysiology | pathophysiology | drug therapy | drug therapy | drug transporters | drug transporters | drug metabolism | drug metabolism | drug toxicity | drug toxicity | drup development | drup development | uptake | uptake | transport | transport

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT) HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The objective of this course is to present a conceptual approach to the study of pharmacological agents. Emphasis is on the principles that determine drug actions and disposition. The course is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopeia nor to replace discussions of specific relevant drugs in the organ systems Health Sciences and Technology pathophysiology courses. The objective of this course is to present a conceptual approach to the study of pharmacological agents. Emphasis is on the principles that determine drug actions and disposition. The course is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopeia nor to replace discussions of specific relevant drugs in the organ systems Health Sciences and Technology pathophysiology courses.

Subjects

health care | health care | pharmacology | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | pharmacologic agents | medical | medical | pre-clinical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biophysics | biochemistry | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | physiology related to drug action | interaction | interaction | distribution | distribution | metabolism | metabolism | toxicity | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | yield | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | substrate solubility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The objective of this course is to present a conceptual approach to the study of pharmacological agents. Emphasis is on the principles that determine drug actions and disposition. The course is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopeia nor to replace discussions of specific relevant drugs in the organ systems Health Sciences and Technology pathophysiology courses.

Subjects

health care | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | medical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | interaction | distribution | metabolism | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT)

Description

This course covers the chemical and biological analysis of the metabolism and distribution of drugs, toxins and chemicals in animals and humans, and the mechanism by which they cause therapeutic and toxic responses. Metabolism and toxicity as a basis for drug development is also covered.

Subjects

pharmacology | toxicology | drug actions | therapeutics | histology | pathophysiology | drug therapy | drug transporters | drug metabolism | drug toxicity | drup development | uptake | transport

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the scientific basis for the development of new drugs. The first half of the semester begins with an overview of the drug discovery process, followed by fundamental principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, and the mechanisms by which drugs cause therapeutic and toxic responses. The second half of the semester applies those principles to case studies and literature discussions of current problems with specific drugs, drug classes, and therapeutic targets.

Subjects

drugs | medicine | pharmaceutical | pharmacology | toxicology | drug actions | therapeutics | histology | pathophysiology | drug therapy | drug transporters | drug metabolism | drug toxicity | drug development | uptake | transport | case study | biochemistry | Pharmacokinetics | Pharmacogenetics | Omeprazole | antibiotics | Oncology | Statins | Sarilumab | cystic fibrosis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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20.201 Mechanisms of Drug Actions (MIT)

Description

This course covers the chemical and biological analysis of the metabolism and distribution of drugs, toxins and chemicals in animals and humans, and the mechanism by which they cause therapeutic and toxic responses. Metabolism and toxicity as a basis for drug development is also covered.

Subjects

pharmacology | toxicology | drug actions | therapeutics | histology | pathophysiology | drug therapy | drug transporters | drug metabolism | drug toxicity | drup development | uptake | transport

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin

Subjects

health care | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | medical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | interaction | distribution | metabolism | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology (MIT)

Description

The object of the course is to teach students an approach to the study of pharmacologic agents. It is not intended to be a review of the pharmacopoeia. The focus is on the basic principles of biophysics, biochemistry and physiology, as related to the mechanisms of drug action, biodistribution and metabolism. The course consists of lectures and student-led case discussions. Topics covered include: mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interaction and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents are examined in detail. Lecturers Prof. Keith Baker Dr. Mark Dershwitz Harold Demonaco Dr. Daniel Kohane Dr. Donald Kufe Prof. Robert Langer Dr. Robert Lees Dr. Robert Rubin

Subjects

health care | pharmacology | pharmacologic agents | medical | pre-clinical | biophysics | biochemistry | physiology related to drug action | interaction | distribution | metabolism | toxicity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | yield | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | substrate solubility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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