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Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami

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Subjects

musicians | musicians | women | women | singing | singing | florida | florida | miami | miami | performingarts | performingarts | hats | hats | singers | singers | womenmusicians | womenmusicians | miamidadecounty | miamidadecounty | personaladornment | personaladornment | domesticarts | domesticarts | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicalintstruments | musicalintstruments | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | ethnicityhaitian | ethnicityhaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | konboguinynmusicalgroup | konboguinynmusicalgroup | deremyamanulu | deremyamanulu | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | songshaitian | songshaitian | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | haitianamericanentertainers | haitianamericanentertainers | saltzmanrikicollector | saltzmanrikicollector | haitianamericanmusicians | haitianamericanmusicians

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The use of citizen journalism by traditional media The use of citizen journalism by traditional media

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Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks

Subjects

traditional | traditional | mainstream | mainstream | readers | readers | media | media | social | social | journalism | journalism | newman | newman | digital | digital | citizen | citizen | content | content | tools | tools | networks | networks | people | people | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20 | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Dressed for Snow

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-69 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | blackandwhitephotograph | door | timber | wood | hat | eyesclosed | books | paper | gloves | coat | buttons | pattern | wool | texture | hinge | smile | decoration | dressed | for | spencefamilycollection | intimateview | season | change | xmas | 19thcentury | christmas | victorianera | medievaltraditions | transformed | q | queenvictoria | princealbert | moderndaytraditions | memory | transformation | unusual | socialhistory | digitalimage | avictorianchristmas | cover | scarf | woman | shoulders | arm | face | eye | interesting | fascinating | intimate | festiveseason | victorianerachristmas | familyhome | house | room | interior | traditions | victoriansociety | female | surreal | mark | grain | blur | shadow | wall | doorway | glove | crease

License

No known copyright restrictions

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A young boy with a Sled in the Snow

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-57 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | digitalimage | blackandwhitephotograph | socialhistory | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | avictorianchristmas | youngboy | child | male | sled | view | glimpse | festiveseason | change | progress | christmas | invention | 19thcentury | victorianerachristmas | victorianera | medievaltraditions | transformation | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | princealbert | christmastree | royalfamily | home | house | wall | roof | sky | tree | branch | vegetation | shadow | daylight | rope | boot | socks | shorts | coat | hat | jumper | smiling | attentive | walking | slope | grain | blur | mark | debris | germantradition | germanborn | childhood | britain | moderndaytraditions | victoriansociety | gutter | land | ground | fascinating | interesting | unusual | engaging | winter

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Frozen Pond at Christmas

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-01-02 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | sepia | frozenpond | christmas | spencefamilycollection | tyneweararchives | intimate | occasion | season | change | invention | 19thcentury | victorianera | medievaltraditions | traditions | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | princealbert | introduction | christmastree | germanchildhood | britain | moderndaytraditions | rooted | victoriansociety | reflection | tree | branch | chair | bench | house | brick | window | frame | glass | wall | roof | chimney | door | step | vegetation | buildings | pavement | path | sepiaphotograph | grain | sky | mark | haunting | surreal | socialheritage | grass | pillar

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Dressed for Snow

Description

Subjects

christmas | door | hinge | wood | xmas | family | snow | cold | texture | wool | smile | hat | paper | festive | season | for | pattern | transformation | timber | buttons | coat | joy | 19thcentury | decoration | victorian | books | gloves | memory | change | leisure | unusual | tradition | q | eyesclosed | dressed | princealbert | queenvictoria | transformed | victorianera | blackandwhitephotograph | intimateview | medievaltraditions | spencefamilycollection | moderndaytraditions

License

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Icicles

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-58 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | socialhistory | sepiaphotograph | avictorianchristmas | 19thcentury | icicles | spencerfamilycollection | tyneweararchives | festivity | winter | ice | water | season | holiday | change | invention | christmas | celebration | victorianera | medievaltraditions | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | germanborn | princealbert | introduction | christmastree | royalty | traditional | childhood | germany | britishfamilies | modernday | rooted | victoriansociety | digitalimage | wall | brick | grain | sky | pipe | window | frame | glass | reflection | tree | branch | blur | roof | gutter | moss | timber | mark | intimateview | changes | transformation | bliss | root | bark | seasons

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A Rigger

Description

This is an Advertisement for William Doxford & Sons Ltd showing a rigger using traditional techniques to splice a wire rope, c1961 Reference: DS.DOX/6/7/4/3 Sunderland has a remarkable history of innovation in shipbuilding and marine engineering. From the development of turret ships in the 1890s and the production of Doxford opposed piston engines after the First World War through to the designs for Liberty ships in the 1940s and SD14s in the 1960s. Sunderland has much to be proud of. Tyne & Wear Archives cares for tens of thousands of photographs in its shipbuilding collections. Most of these focus on the ships ? in particular their construction, launch and sea trials. This set looks to redress the balance and to celebrate the work of the men and women who have played such a vital part in the region?s history. The images show the human side of this great story, with many relating to the world famous shipbuilding and engineering firm William Doxford & Sons Ltd. The Archives has produced a short blog to accompany these images. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

shipbuilding | cable | williamdoxfordsonsltd | rigger | man | wirerope | dedicated | shipbuildingtradition | humanity | maritimeheritage | poignant | proud | blackandwhite | text | industrialheritage | workersofsunderland | blackandwhitephotograph | shipbuildingheritage | maritime | abstract | archives | advertisement | traditionaltechniques | splice | c1961 | sunderland | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | fascinating | interesting | unusual | impressive | innovation | marineengineering | development | ships | construction | launch | seatrials | worker | rope | room | dark | wall | brick | cap | crease | fabric | tool | handle | wrinkle | pocket | flap | bench | parts | metal | reel | traditional | industry | pile | working | attentive | standing | handling | hand | finger | intricate | generations | transportation

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Automated Planning Automated Planning

Description

The course on Automated planning introduces the Artificial Intelligence approach to the planning task. Automated planning is a computational task that, given a domain description (in terms of available actions), an initial state and a set of goals, generates a plan that allows to achieve the goals from the initial state by executing the plan actions. The course on Automated planning introduces the Artificial Intelligence approach to the planning task. Automated planning is a computational task that, given a domain description (in terms of available actions), an initial state and a set of goals, generates a plan that allows to achieve the goals from the initial state by executing the plan actions.

Subjects

n e Inteligencia Artificial | n e Inteligencia Artificial | automated planning | automated planning | traditional planning | traditional planning | heuristic planning | heuristic planning | planning | planning | neoclassical planning | neoclassical planning | knowledge control | knowledge control | 2008 | 2008

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds. Has there ever been an "Age of Reason?" In the western tradition, one might make claims for various moments during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In this class, however, we will focus on the two and a half centuries between 1600 and 1850, a period when insights first developed in the natural sciences and mathematics were seized upon by social theorists, institutional reformers and political revolutionaries who sought to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Through the study of trials, art, literature, theater, music, politics, and culture more generally, we will consider evolution and revolution in these two and a half centuries. We will also attend to those who opposed change on both traditional and radical grounds.

Subjects

Age of Reason | Age of Reason | philosophy | philosophy | cultural history | cultural history | intellectual history | intellectual history | History | History | western tradition | western tradition | Antiquity | Antiquity | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | Renaissance | Renaissance | 1600 | 1600 | 1850 | 1850 | natural sciences | natural sciences | mathematics | mathematics | social theorists | social theorists | institutional reformers | institutional reformers | political revolutionaries | political revolutionaries | change | change | themselves | themselves | society | society | trials | trials | art | art | literature | literature | theater | theater | music | music | politics | politics | culture | culture | evolution | evolution | revolution. | revolution.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT) MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (MIT)

Description

This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art. This class introduces principles of analysis and synthesis in the computational medium. Expressive examples that illustrate the intersection of computation with the traditional arts are developed on a weekly basis. Hands-on design exercises are continually framed and examined in the larger context of contemporary digital art.

Subjects

analysis | analysis | synthesis | synthesis | computational media | computational media | computational and traditional arts | computational and traditional arts | design | design | programming | programming | javascript | javascript | contemporary digital art | contemporary digital art | machine age | machine age | media design | media design | analog vs digital art | analog vs digital art | graphic design | graphic design | web design | web design | photography | photography | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | computation | computation | arts | arts | design exercises | design exercises | studio | studio | analog art | analog art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT) 21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in that history in connection with two interrelated ideas. The first of these ideas underlies much of our modern regard for the novel as a literary form–namely, the idea that if fiction intends to deal with the most important forces animating the collective life of humanity, it will not deal with the actions of persons of immense consequence–kings, princes, high elected officials and the like–but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires: to use a phrase of Balzac's,  with "ce qui se passe partout" (what happens everywhere). This idea sometimes goes with another:&#160 This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in that history in connection with two interrelated ideas. The first of these ideas underlies much of our modern regard for the novel as a literary form–namely, the idea that if fiction intends to deal with the most important forces animating the collective life of humanity, it will not deal with the actions of persons of immense consequence–kings, princes, high elected officials and the like–but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires: to use a phrase of Balzac's,  with "ce qui se passe partout" (what happens everywhere). This idea sometimes goes with another:&#160

Subjects

literature | literature | western | western | europe | europe | novel | novel | history | history | fiction | fiction | cervantes | cervantes | balzac | balzac | stendahl | stendahl | flaubert | flaubert | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | tolstoy | tolstoy | realistic tradition | realistic tradition | romantic | romantic | naturalism | naturalism | stendhal | stendhal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | WMN.472 | WMN.472

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT)

Description

Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English. Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English.

Subjects

genre | genre | tradition | tradition | Chinese poetry | Chinese poetry | Chinese fiction | Chinese fiction | Chinese drama | Chinese drama | Journey to the West | Journey to the West | Outlaws of the Margin | Outlaws of the Margin | Dream of the Red Chamber | Dream of the Red Chamber | Tang dynasty poets | Tang dynasty poets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT) 21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage); (b) basic reading skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified); (c) an understanding of the way the Chinese writing system is structured, and the ability to copy and write characters; and (d) a sense of what learning a language like Chinese entails, and the sort of learning processes that it involves, so students are able to continue studying effectively on t This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The purpose of this course is to develop: (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage); (b) basic reading skills (in both the traditional character set and the simplified); (c) an understanding of the way the Chinese writing system is structured, and the ability to copy and write characters; and (d) a sense of what learning a language like Chinese entails, and the sort of learning processes that it involves, so students are able to continue studying effectively on t

Subjects

Chinese | Chinese | Language | Language | Writing | Writing | Speaking | Speaking | Culture | Culture | China | China | Asia | Asia | Mandarin | Mandarin | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | chinese | chinese | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | pronunciation | pronunciation | grammar | grammar | vocabulary | vocabulary | reading competence | reading competence | traditional characters | traditional characters | composition | composition | romanization | romanization | simplified characters | simplified characters | 21F.101 | 21F.101 | 21F.151 | 21F.151

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21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT) 21G.101 Chinese I (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The emphasis is on developing (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage), (b) basic reading and writing skills, and (c) an understanding of the language learning process so that students are able to continue studying effectively on their own.The main text is J. K. Wheatley’s Learning Chinese: A Foundation Course in Mandarin, part I (unpublished, but available online), which consists of several introductory chapters, seven core lessons (labeled 1, 2, 3&am This subject is the first semester of two that form an introduction to modern standard Chinese, commonly called Mandarin. Though not everyone taking this course will be an absolute beginner, the course presupposes no prior background in the language. The emphasis is on developing (a) basic conversational abilities (pronunciation, fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary, and standard usage), (b) basic reading and writing skills, and (c) an understanding of the language learning process so that students are able to continue studying effectively on their own.The main text is J. K. Wheatley’s Learning Chinese: A Foundation Course in Mandarin, part I (unpublished, but available online), which consists of several introductory chapters, seven core lessons (labeled 1, 2, 3&am

Subjects

Asia | Asia | China | China | Culture | Culture | Language | Language | Mandarin | Mandarin | Speaking | Speaking | Writing | Writing | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | chinese | chinese | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | pronunciation | pronunciation | reading competence | reading competence | romanization | romanization | simplified characters | simplified characters | traditional characters | traditional characters | vocabulary | vocabulary

License

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its prima

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

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21G.704 Spanish 4 (MIT) 21G.704 Spanish 4 (MIT)

Description

El curso de Español IV tiene como objetivo mejorar la comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio de la lengua, la literatura, la historia y la cultura del mundo hispano. También aspira a desarrollar la habilidad lectora del estudiante, exponiéndolo a textos literarios y periodísticos que reflejen la diversidad cultural del mundo hispano-hablante. El curso está organizado por temas sociales, políticos y culturales comunes a las sociedades hispanas, por ejemplo, la identidad cultural, el rol cambiante de la mujer y la familia, el desarrollo económico y su efecto en la cultura tradicional y el medio ambiente, y los derechos del individuo en el sistema político. El curso de Español IV tiene como objetivo mejorar la comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio de la lengua, la literatura, la historia y la cultura del mundo hispano. También aspira a desarrollar la habilidad lectora del estudiante, exponiéndolo a textos literarios y periodísticos que reflejen la diversidad cultural del mundo hispano-hablante. El curso está organizado por temas sociales, políticos y culturales comunes a las sociedades hispanas, por ejemplo, la identidad cultural, el rol cambiante de la mujer y la familia, el desarrollo económico y su efecto en la cultura tradicional y el medio ambiente, y los derechos del individuo en el sistema político.

Subjects

spanish | spanish | foreign language | foreign language | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | literature | literature | culture | culture | history | history | society | society | hispanic | hispanic | latin america | latin america | western europe | western europe | spain | spain | central america | central america | south america | south america | identity | identity | politics | politics | family | family | economy | economy | tradition | tradition

License

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21H.411 History of Western Thought, 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.411 History of Western Thought, 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course examines the development of the western intellectual tradition from the fall of the Roman Empire through the High Middle Ages. Our basic premise will be that the triumph of Christianity in the west was not the inevitable outcome it appears from hindsight. Our attention will therefore be focused not only on the development of Christian thought and practice, but on its challengers as well. Particular emphasis will be devoted to northern paganism, the rise of Islam, Byzantine orthodoxy, indigenous heretical movements, and the ambiguous position of Jews in European society. This course examines the development of the western intellectual tradition from the fall of the Roman Empire through the High Middle Ages. Our basic premise will be that the triumph of Christianity in the west was not the inevitable outcome it appears from hindsight. Our attention will therefore be focused not only on the development of Christian thought and practice, but on its challengers as well. Particular emphasis will be devoted to northern paganism, the rise of Islam, Byzantine orthodoxy, indigenous heretical movements, and the ambiguous position of Jews in European society.

Subjects

western intellectual tradition | western intellectual tradition | Roman Empire | Roman Empire | High Middle Ages | High Middle Ages | Christian | Christian | paganism | paganism | Islam | Islam | Byzantine orthodoxy | Byzantine orthodoxy | heretical movements | heretical movements | Jews | Jews

License

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21W.730-4 Writing and the Environment (MIT) 21W.730-4 Writing and the Environment (MIT)

Description

Environmentalists have traditionally relied upon the power of their prose to transform the thoughts and behavior of their contemporaries. John Muir, founder of the Sierra Club, evoked the wonders of California's Hetch Hetchy Valley in the hope that he could stop a dam with words. Another early environmentalist, Aldo Leopold, summoned up a world made barren by the loss of predators in the hope that he could stop the slaughter of wolves. More recently, Rachel Carson, a marine biologist with a penchant for writing, described a world without wildlife in Silent Spring and altered the way that Americans understood their impact on the landscape. Leopold and Carson were professional scientists, and like the other writers we will encounter this fall, they realized that they could alter the percept Environmentalists have traditionally relied upon the power of their prose to transform the thoughts and behavior of their contemporaries. John Muir, founder of the Sierra Club, evoked the wonders of California's Hetch Hetchy Valley in the hope that he could stop a dam with words. Another early environmentalist, Aldo Leopold, summoned up a world made barren by the loss of predators in the hope that he could stop the slaughter of wolves. More recently, Rachel Carson, a marine biologist with a penchant for writing, described a world without wildlife in Silent Spring and altered the way that Americans understood their impact on the landscape. Leopold and Carson were professional scientists, and like the other writers we will encounter this fall, they realized that they could alter the percept

Subjects

ethnic identity | ethnic identity | ethnic tradition | ethnic tradition | race | race | culture | culture | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Sandra Cisneros | Sandra Cisneros | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri

License

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT) 11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course. This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | history | theory of historic preservation | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | historic preservation movement | laws | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | urban studies and planning | architecture | architecture

License

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

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