Searching for traditions : 26 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami

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Subjects

musicians | musicians | women | women | singing | singing | florida | florida | miami | miami | performingarts | performingarts | hats | hats | singers | singers | womenmusicians | womenmusicians | miamidadecounty | miamidadecounty | personaladornment | personaladornment | domesticarts | domesticarts | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicalintstruments | musicalintstruments | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | ethnicityhaitian | ethnicityhaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | konboguinynmusicalgroup | konboguinynmusicalgroup | deremyamanulu | deremyamanulu | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | songshaitian | songshaitian | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | haitianamericanentertainers | haitianamericanentertainers | saltzmanrikicollector | saltzmanrikicollector | haitianamericanmusicians | haitianamericanmusicians

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Dressed for Snow

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-69 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | blackandwhitephotograph | door | timber | wood | hat | eyesclosed | books | paper | gloves | coat | buttons | pattern | wool | texture | hinge | smile | decoration | dressed | for | spencefamilycollection | intimateview | season | change | xmas | 19thcentury | christmas | victorianera | medievaltraditions | transformed | q | queenvictoria | princealbert | moderndaytraditions | memory | transformation | unusual | socialhistory | digitalimage | avictorianchristmas | cover | scarf | woman | shoulders | arm | face | eye | interesting | fascinating | intimate | festiveseason | victorianerachristmas | familyhome | house | room | interior | traditions | victoriansociety | female | surreal | mark | grain | blur | shadow | wall | doorway | glove | crease

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Frozen Pond at Christmas

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-01-02 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | sepia | frozenpond | christmas | spencefamilycollection | tyneweararchives | intimate | occasion | season | change | invention | 19thcentury | victorianera | medievaltraditions | traditions | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | princealbert | introduction | christmastree | germanchildhood | britain | moderndaytraditions | rooted | victoriansociety | reflection | tree | branch | chair | bench | house | brick | window | frame | glass | wall | roof | chimney | door | step | vegetation | buildings | pavement | path | sepiaphotograph | grain | sky | mark | haunting | surreal | socialheritage | grass | pillar

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SP.694 Issues of Representation: Women, Representation, and Music in Selected Folk Traditions of the British Isles and North America (MIT) SP.694 Issues of Representation: Women, Representation, and Music in Selected Folk Traditions of the British Isles and North America (MIT)

Description

This subject investigates the special relation of women to several musical folk traditions in the British Isles and North America. Throughout, we will be examining the implications of gender in the creation, transmission, and performance of music. Because virtually all societies operate to some extent on a gendered division of labor (and of expressive roles) the music of these societies is marked by the gendering of musical repertoires, traditions of instrumentation, performance settings, and styles. This seminar will examine the gendered dimensions of the music - the song texts, the performance styles, processes of dissemination (collection, literary representation) and issues of historiography - with respect to selected traditions within the folk musics of North America and the British I This subject investigates the special relation of women to several musical folk traditions in the British Isles and North America. Throughout, we will be examining the implications of gender in the creation, transmission, and performance of music. Because virtually all societies operate to some extent on a gendered division of labor (and of expressive roles) the music of these societies is marked by the gendering of musical repertoires, traditions of instrumentation, performance settings, and styles. This seminar will examine the gendered dimensions of the music - the song texts, the performance styles, processes of dissemination (collection, literary representation) and issues of historiography - with respect to selected traditions within the folk musics of North America and the British I

Subjects

Representation | Representation | women | women | music | music | folk music | folk music | traditions | traditions | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | gender | gender | creation | creation | transmission | transmission | performance | performance | dissemination | dissemination | collection | collection | literary representation | literary representation | historiography | historiography | stories | stories | female identity | female identity | song texts | song texts | work | work | cultural roles | cultural roles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A young boy with a Sled in the Snow

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-57 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | digitalimage | blackandwhitephotograph | socialhistory | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | avictorianchristmas | youngboy | child | male | sled | view | glimpse | festiveseason | change | progress | christmas | invention | 19thcentury | victorianerachristmas | victorianera | medievaltraditions | transformation | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | princealbert | christmastree | royalfamily | home | house | wall | roof | sky | tree | branch | vegetation | shadow | daylight | rope | boot | socks | shorts | coat | hat | jumper | smiling | attentive | walking | slope | grain | blur | mark | debris | germantradition | germanborn | childhood | britain | moderndaytraditions | victoriansociety | gutter | land | ground | fascinating | interesting | unusual | engaging | winter

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21L.002X Foundations of World Culture II: World Literatures and Texts (MIT) 21L.002X Foundations of World Culture II: World Literatures and Texts (MIT)

Description

This class continues our study of the foundational texts of human culture, focusing on early modernity until the recent past. In many ways, this includes several questions such as: Why did these works achieve the fame and influence they achieved? How do they present what it means to be a human being? How do they describe the role of a member of a family, community, tradition, social class, gender? How do they distinguish between proper and improper behavior? How do they characterize the members of other groups? However, in several ways, these texts are also iconoclastic, breaking with centuries of established tradition to shed light on previously unexplored subjects, such as the status of women in society or the legacy of the colonial expansion of European countries. They also question wel This class continues our study of the foundational texts of human culture, focusing on early modernity until the recent past. In many ways, this includes several questions such as: Why did these works achieve the fame and influence they achieved? How do they present what it means to be a human being? How do they describe the role of a member of a family, community, tradition, social class, gender? How do they distinguish between proper and improper behavior? How do they characterize the members of other groups? However, in several ways, these texts are also iconoclastic, breaking with centuries of established tradition to shed light on previously unexplored subjects, such as the status of women in society or the legacy of the colonial expansion of European countries. They also question wel

Subjects

human culture | human culture | established traditions | established traditions | religious beliefs | religious beliefs | monarchical rule | monarchical rule | world literatures | world literatures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT) 11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course. This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | history | theory of historic preservation | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | historic preservation movement | laws | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | urban studies and planning | architecture | architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

WGS.591 | WGS.591 | world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | race | race | sex | sex | student work | student work

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Dressed for Snow

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christmas | door | hinge | wood | xmas | family | snow | cold | texture | wool | smile | hat | paper | festive | season | for | pattern | transformation | timber | buttons | coat | joy | 19thcentury | decoration | victorian | books | gloves | memory | change | leisure | unusual | tradition | q | eyesclosed | dressed | princealbert | queenvictoria | transformed | victorianera | blackandwhitephotograph | intimateview | medievaltraditions | spencefamilycollection | moderndaytraditions

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Karen and Diane McDowell, of Gainesville, singing in White Springs Karen and Diane McDowell, of Gainesville, singing in White Springs

Description

Subjects

girls | girls | music | music | costume | costume | florida | florida | gainesville | gainesville | festivals | festivals | hats | hats | singers | singers | microphone | microphone | hamiltoncounty | hamiltoncounty | folkfestivals | folkfestivals | whitesprings | whitesprings | vocalmusic | vocalmusic | childrenscostumes | childrenscostumes | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | mcdowelldiane | mcdowelldiane | floridafolkfestival7th1959 | floridafolkfestival7th1959 | folklorerevivalfestivals | folklorerevivalfestivals | mcdowellkaren | mcdowellkaren

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WGS.645 Issues of Representation: Women, Representation, and Music in Selected Folk Traditions of the British Isles and North America (MIT) WGS.645 Issues of Representation: Women, Representation, and Music in Selected Folk Traditions of the British Isles and North America (MIT)

Description

This subject investigates the special relation of women to several musical folk traditions in the British Isles and North America. Throughout, we will be examining the implications of gender in the creation, transmission, and performance of music. Because virtually all societies operate to some extent on a gendered division of labor (and of expressive roles) the music of these societies is marked by the gendering of musical repertoires, traditions of instrumentation, performance settings, and styles. This seminar will examine the gendered dimensions of the music - the song texts, the performance styles, processes of dissemination (collection, literary representation) and issues of historiography - with respect to selected traditions within the folk musics of North America and the British I This subject investigates the special relation of women to several musical folk traditions in the British Isles and North America. Throughout, we will be examining the implications of gender in the creation, transmission, and performance of music. Because virtually all societies operate to some extent on a gendered division of labor (and of expressive roles) the music of these societies is marked by the gendering of musical repertoires, traditions of instrumentation, performance settings, and styles. This seminar will examine the gendered dimensions of the music - the song texts, the performance styles, processes of dissemination (collection, literary representation) and issues of historiography - with respect to selected traditions within the folk musics of North America and the British I

Subjects

Representation | Representation | women | women | music | music | folk music | folk music | traditions | traditions | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | gender | gender | creation | creation | transmission | transmission | performance | performance | dissemination | dissemination | collection | collection | literary representation | literary representation | historiography | historiography | stories | stories | female identity | female identity | song texts | song texts | work | work | cultural roles | cultural roles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Learned it in Back Days and Kept It: A portrait of Lucreaty Clark Learned it in Back Days and Kept It: A portrait of Lucreaty Clark

Description

Subjects

florida | florida | jeffersoncounty | jeffersoncounty | lucreatyclark | lucreatyclark | basketmakers | basketmakers | folkart | folkart | whiteoakbaskets | whiteoakbaskets | traditions | traditions | folkheritageawardrecepients | folkheritageawardrecepients

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | WMN.472 | WMN.472

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moses Williams playing the diddley bow at the 1980 Folk Festival in White Springs

Description

Subjects

music | men | singing | florida | festivals | blues | microphone | musicalinstruments | hamiltoncounty | stringedinstruments | folkfestivals | whitesprings | instrumentalists | diddleybow | folkmusicians | africanamericanmen | africanamericanmusicians | bluesmusicians | artsperforming | floridafolkfestival | africanamericansingers | musicaltraditions | williamsmoses | folklorerevivalfestivals

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21L.002X Foundations of World Culture II: World Literatures and Texts (MIT)

Description

This class continues our study of the foundational texts of human culture, focusing on early modernity until the recent past. In many ways, this includes several questions such as: Why did these works achieve the fame and influence they achieved? How do they present what it means to be a human being? How do they describe the role of a member of a family, community, tradition, social class, gender? How do they distinguish between proper and improper behavior? How do they characterize the members of other groups? However, in several ways, these texts are also iconoclastic, breaking with centuries of established tradition to shed light on previously unexplored subjects, such as the status of women in society or the legacy of the colonial expansion of European countries. They also question wel

Subjects

human culture | established traditions | religious beliefs | monarchical rule | world literatures

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Icicles

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-58 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | socialhistory | sepiaphotograph | avictorianchristmas | 19thcentury | icicles | spencerfamilycollection | tyneweararchives | festivity | winter | ice | water | season | holiday | change | invention | christmas | celebration | victorianera | medievaltraditions | evergreens | food | queenvictoria | germanborn | princealbert | introduction | christmastree | royalty | traditional | childhood | germany | britishfamilies | modernday | rooted | victoriansociety | digitalimage | wall | brick | grain | sky | pipe | window | frame | glass | reflection | tree | branch | blur | roof | gutter | moss | timber | mark | intimateview | changes | transformation | bliss | root | bark | seasons

License

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A Young Girl Ice Skating

Description

This set, taken from the Spence Family collection at Tyne & Wear Archives offers an intimate view in to a Family enjoying the festive season during this time of change and the invention of Christmas. Reference: DX 1295-1-1-05 At the beginning of the 19th Century, Christmas was hardly celebrated. However, during the Victorian Era Christmas as we know it today was invented, and our modest medieval traditions of evergreens and food were transformed. Much if this change was due to Queen Victoria and her marriage to the German-born Prince Albert. Albert introduced many aspects of Christmas as we know it, most notably the first Christmas tree in the royal family?s home. This was a tradition Albert brought to his family from his own childhood in Germany, but also to every other family in Britain. As a result the Victorians also transformed the idea of Christmas so that it became centred around the family, and our modern day traditions are deeply rooted in those of Victorian Society. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

festive | victorian | snow | family | tradition | cold | leisure | joy | sepiaphotograph | avictorianchristmas | girl | iceskating | festiveseason | socialhistory | spencefamilycollection | change | innovative | victorianerachristmas | medieval | traditions | queenvictoria | princealbert | germanborn | introduced | royalty | royal | germanchildhood | britain | unitedkingdom | victoriansociety | digitalimage | archives | blur | grain | mark | tree | ice | vegetation | branch | leaf | winter | skate | blade | dress | fabric | crease | coat | button | hat | gloves | stockings | shoe | standing | hair | distracted | fascinating | mysterious | interesting | unusual | christmas | germany | germanvalues

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and contexts of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography which lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

world traditions in dance | American concert dance | gender | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | American dance | choreography | WMN.472

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Pianist Ida Goodson performing at the Great Gulf Coast Arts Festival in Pensacola

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Subjects

music | women | florida | piano | festivals | blues | folkmusic | songs | gospel | pensacola | ethnicity | musicalinstruments | gospelmusic | folkfestivals | africanamericanwomen | materialculture | escambiacounty | folkmusicians | pianomusic | womenmusicians | africanamericanmusicians | bluesmusicians | artsperforming | greatgulfcoastartsfestival | gospelmusicians | musicaltraditions | owenblanton | africanamericangospelsingers | womenpianists | folklorerevivalfestivals | goodsonida

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WGS.645 Issues of Representation: Women, Representation, and Music in Selected Folk Traditions of the British Isles and North America (MIT)

Description

This subject investigates the special relation of women to several musical folk traditions in the British Isles and North America. Throughout, we will be examining the implications of gender in the creation, transmission, and performance of music. Because virtually all societies operate to some extent on a gendered division of labor (and of expressive roles) the music of these societies is marked by the gendering of musical repertoires, traditions of instrumentation, performance settings, and styles. This seminar will examine the gendered dimensions of the music - the song texts, the performance styles, processes of dissemination (collection, literary representation) and issues of historiography - with respect to selected traditions within the folk musics of North America and the British I

Subjects

Representation | women | music | folk music | traditions | British Isles | North America | gender | creation | transmission | performance | dissemination | collection | literary representation | historiography | stories | female identity | song texts | work | cultural roles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Plato on tradition and belief

Description

How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course explores Plato's dialogue the Laches to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason rather than tradition to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous.

Subjects

The Arts | Classical Studies | AA100_2 | Plato | traditions | belief | The Laches | morality | ethics

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

WGS.591 | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | gender | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | American dance | choreography | race | sex | student work

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Plato on tradition and belief

Description

How can we settle questions of morality or ethics? This free course explores Plato's dialogue the Laches to discover why Plato thought that we should look to reason rather than tradition to decide how we should live and what it means to be courageous.

Subjects

The Arts | Classical Studies | AA100_2 | Plato | traditions | belief | The Laches | morality | ethics

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

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