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22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems (MIT) 22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems (MIT)

Description

In this course, students explore the engineering design of nuclear power plants using the basic principles of reactor physics, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer. Topics include reactor designs, thermal analysis of nuclear fuel, reactor coolant flow and heat transfer, power conversion cycles, nuclear safety, and reactor dynamic behavior. In this course, students explore the engineering design of nuclear power plants using the basic principles of reactor physics, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer. Topics include reactor designs, thermal analysis of nuclear fuel, reactor coolant flow and heat transfer, power conversion cycles, nuclear safety, and reactor dynamic behavior.

Subjects

nuclear power overview | nuclear power overview | accelerators | accelerators | reactor physics review | reactor physics review | thermal parameters | thermal parameters | PWR | PWR | BWR | BWR | reactor design | reactor design | thermal analysis of fuel | thermal analysis of fuel | ideal gas and incompressible fluid models | ideal gas and incompressible fluid models | single phase coolant heat transfer | single phase coolant heat transfer | pure substance model | pure substance model | two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer | two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer | power cycles | power cycles | nuclear safety | nuclear safety

License

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6.642 Continuum Electromechanics (MIT) 6.642 Continuum Electromechanics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course focuses on laws, approximations and relations of continuum electromechanics. Topics include mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations, statics and dynamics of electromechanical systems having a static equilibrium, electromechanical flows, and field coupling with thermal and molecular diffusion. Also covered are electrokinetics, streaming interactions, application to materials processing, magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators, ferrohydrodynamics, physiochemical systems, heat transfer, continuum feedback control, electron beam devices, and plasma dynamics. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Xuancheng Shao and Anyang Hou for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set solution Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course focuses on laws, approximations and relations of continuum electromechanics. Topics include mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations, statics and dynamics of electromechanical systems having a static equilibrium, electromechanical flows, and field coupling with thermal and molecular diffusion. Also covered are electrokinetics, streaming interactions, application to materials processing, magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators, ferrohydrodynamics, physiochemical systems, heat transfer, continuum feedback control, electron beam devices, and plasma dynamics. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Xuancheng Shao and Anyang Hou for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set solution

Subjects

continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | electromechanics | electromechanics | mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations | mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | electromechanical systems | electromechanical systems | static equililbrium | static equililbrium | electromechanical flows | electromechanical flows | field coupling | field coupling | thermal and molecular diffusion | thermal and molecular diffusion | electrokinetics | electrokinetics | streaming interactions | streaming interactions | materials processing | materials processing | magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators | magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators | ferrohydrodynamics | ferrohydrodynamics | physiochemical systems | physiochemical systems | heat transfer | heat transfer | continuum feedback control | continuum feedback control | electron beam devices | electron beam devices | plasma dynamics | plasma dynamics

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STS.360 Ethnography (MIT) STS.360 Ethnography (MIT)

Description

This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites. This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | fieldwork | fieldwork | oral history | oral history | ethnomethodology | ethnomethodology | advertising | advertising | knowledge communities | knowledge communities | interviewing | interviewing | restudies | restudies | practicum | practicum | anthropological methods | anthropological methods | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic writing | ethnographic writing | ethnographic reading | ethnographic reading | ethnographic practice | ethnographic practice | anthropological studies | anthropological studies | science studies | science studies | ethnographies | ethnographies | labs | labs | companies | companies | sites | sites | advocacy | advocacy | critique | critique | transference | transference | countertransference | countertransference | translation | translation | data | data | models | models | explanations | explanations | hypotheses | hypotheses | generalizations | generalizations | interpretations | interpretations | ethnography | ethnography

License

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT) 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer. 2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | heat transfer | mass transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | evaporation | solar radiation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | grey radiation networks | black bodies | black bodies | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | external configurations | external configurations | natural convection | natural convection | forced convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

License

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10.302 Transport Processes (MIT) 10.302 Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

Principles of heat and mass transfer. Steady and transient conduction and diffusion. Radiative heat transfer. Convective transport of heat and mass in both laminar and turbulent flows. Emphasis on the development of a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and upon the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance. Principles of heat and mass transfer. Steady and transient conduction and diffusion. Radiative heat transfer. Convective transport of heat and mass in both laminar and turbulent flows. Emphasis on the development of a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and upon the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.

Subjects

heat transfer | heat transfer | mass transfer | mass transfer | transport processes | transport processes | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | heat diffusion | heat diffusion | boundary and initial conditions | boundary and initial conditions | conduction | conduction | steady-state conduction | steady-state conduction | heat diffusion equation | heat diffusion equation | spatial effects | spatial effects | radiation | radiation | blackbody exchange | blackbody exchange | extended surfaces | extended surfaces | gray surfaces | gray surfaces | heat exchangers | heat exchangers | convection | convection | boundary layers | boundary layers | steady diffusion | steady diffusion | transient diffusion | transient diffusion

License

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6.642 Continuum Electromechanics (MIT) 6.642 Continuum Electromechanics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on laws, approximations, and relations of continuum electromechanics. Topics include mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations, statics and dynamics of electromechanical systems having a static equilibrium, electromechanical flows, and field coupling with thermal and molecular diffusion. See the syllabus section for a more detailed list of topics. This course focuses on laws, approximations, and relations of continuum electromechanics. Topics include mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations, statics and dynamics of electromechanical systems having a static equilibrium, electromechanical flows, and field coupling with thermal and molecular diffusion. See the syllabus section for a more detailed list of topics.

Subjects

continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | electromechanics | electromechanics | mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations | mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | electromechanical systems | electromechanical systems | static equililbrium | static equililbrium | electromechanical flows | electromechanical flows | field coupling | field coupling | thermal and molecular diffusion | thermal and molecular diffusion | electrokinetics | electrokinetics | streaming interactions | streaming interactions | materials processing | materials processing | magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators | magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators | ferrohydrodynamics | ferrohydrodynamics | physiochemical systems | physiochemical systems | heat transfer | heat transfer | continuum feedback control | continuum feedback control | electron beam devices | electron beam devices | plasma dynamics | plasma dynamics

License

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Control (MIT) Control (MIT)

Description

6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced. 6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced.

Subjects

control | control | linear | linear | discrete | discrete | continuous-time | continuous-time | multi-input-output | multi-input-output | least squares | least squares | matrix perturbation | matrix perturbation | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | zeros | zeros | minimality | minimality | feedback | feedback | compensators | compensators | state feedback | state feedback | optimal regulation | optimal regulation | observers | transfer functions | observers | transfer functions | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | linear systems | linear systems

License

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT) 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer. 2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | heat transfer | mass transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | evaporation | solar radiation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | grey radiation networks | black bodies | black bodies | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | external configurations | external configurations | natural convection | natural convection | forced convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

License

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2.58J Radiative Transfer (MIT) 2.58J Radiative Transfer (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the principles of thermal radiation and their applications to engineering heat and photon transfer problems. Topics include quantum and classical models of radiative properties of materials, electromagnetic wave theory for thermal radiation, radiative transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media, and coherent laser radiation. Applications cover laser-material interactions, imaging, infrared instrumentation, global warming, semiconductor manufacturing, combustion, furnaces, and high temperature processing. This course investigates the principles of thermal radiation and their applications to engineering heat and photon transfer problems. Topics include quantum and classical models of radiative properties of materials, electromagnetic wave theory for thermal radiation, radiative transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media, and coherent laser radiation. Applications cover laser-material interactions, imaging, infrared instrumentation, global warming, semiconductor manufacturing, combustion, furnaces, and high temperature processing.

Subjects

thermal radiation | thermal radiation | heat transfer | heat transfer | photon transfer | photon transfer | quantum modeling | quantum modeling | materials | materials | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | absorption | absorption | emitting media | emitting media | scattering | scattering | laser | laser | imaging | imaging | infrared | infrared | global warming | global warming | semiconductor manufacturing | semiconductor manufacturing | combustion | combustion | furnace | furnace | high temperature processing | high temperature processing | Drude | Drude | Lorenz | Lorenz | gas | gas | dielectric | dielectric | Monte Carlo | Monte Carlo | simulation | simulation | solar energy | solar energy | solar power | solar power | solar cell | solar cell | 2.58 | 2.58 | 10.74 | 10.74

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2.26 Compressible Fluid Dynamics (MIT) 2.26 Compressible Fluid Dynamics (MIT)

Description

2.26 is a 6-unit Honors-level subject serving as the Mechanical Engineering department's sole course in compressible fluid dynamics. The prerequisites for this course are undergraduate courses in thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. The goal of this course is to lay out the fundamental concepts and results for the compressible flow of gases. Topics to be covered include: appropriate conservation laws; propagation of disturbances; isentropic flows; normal shock wave relations, oblique shock waves, weak and strong shocks, and shock wave structure; compressible flows in ducts with area changes, friction, or heat addition; heat transfer to high speed flows; unsteady compressible flows, Riemann invariants, and piston and shock tube problems; steady 2D supersonic flow, Prandtl-Mey 2.26 is a 6-unit Honors-level subject serving as the Mechanical Engineering department's sole course in compressible fluid dynamics. The prerequisites for this course are undergraduate courses in thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. The goal of this course is to lay out the fundamental concepts and results for the compressible flow of gases. Topics to be covered include: appropriate conservation laws; propagation of disturbances; isentropic flows; normal shock wave relations, oblique shock waves, weak and strong shocks, and shock wave structure; compressible flows in ducts with area changes, friction, or heat addition; heat transfer to high speed flows; unsteady compressible flows, Riemann invariants, and piston and shock tube problems; steady 2D supersonic flow, Prandtl-Mey

Subjects

conservation laws | conservation laws | isentropic flows | isentropic flows | normal shock wave relations | normal shock wave relations | oblique shock waves | oblique shock waves | weak shock | weak shock | strong shock | strong shock | ducts | ducts | heat transfer | heat transfer | unsteady flows | unsteady flows | Riemann invariants | Riemann invariants | piston | piston | shock tube | shock tube | steady 2D supersonic flow | steady 2D supersonic flow | Prandtl-Meyer function | Prandtl-Meyer function | self-similar compressible flows | self-similar compressible flows

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7.344 The Fountain of Life: From Dolly to Customized Embryonic Stem Cells (MIT) 7.344 The Fountain of Life: From Dolly to Customized Embryonic Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development, the genetic content of each cell remains, with a few exceptions, identical to that of the zygote. Most differentiated cells therefore retain all of the genetic information necessary to generate an entire organism. It was through pioneering technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) that this concept was experimentally proven. Only 10 years ago the sheep Dolly was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult organism, demonstrating that the differentiated state of a mammalian cell can be fully reversible to a pluripotent embryonic state. A key conclusion from these experiments was that the difference between pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and unipotent differentiated cells is solely a consequence of reversible changes. These changes, which hav During development, the genetic content of each cell remains, with a few exceptions, identical to that of the zygote. Most differentiated cells therefore retain all of the genetic information necessary to generate an entire organism. It was through pioneering technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) that this concept was experimentally proven. Only 10 years ago the sheep Dolly was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult organism, demonstrating that the differentiated state of a mammalian cell can be fully reversible to a pluripotent embryonic state. A key conclusion from these experiments was that the difference between pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and unipotent differentiated cells is solely a consequence of reversible changes. These changes, which hav

Subjects

embryonic stem cells | embryonic stem cells | stem cells | stem cells | cells | cells | genetics | genetics | genome | genome | Dolly | Dolly | clone | clone | regenerative therapy | regenerative therapy | somatic | somatic | SCNT | SCNT | pluripotent | pluripotent | scientific literature | scientific literature | nuclear | nuclear | embryonic | embryonic | adult | adult | epigenetics | epigenetics | methylation | methylation | DNA | DNA | histone | histone | biomedical | biomedical | differentiation | differentiation | epigenome | epigenome | nuclear transfer | nuclear transfer | customized | customized | zygote | zygote | RNA | RNA | cancer | cancer | medicine | medicine

License

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

This subject provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. It introduces the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings. It includes a detailed treatment of different forms of energy, energy conservation, properties of gases and liquids, air-water vapor mixtures and performance limits for air conditioning and power producing systems. Heat transfer principles are introduced with applications to energy losses from a building envelope. The subject is a prerequisite for more advanced thermo-science subjects in Architecture and Mechanical Engineering. This subject provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. It introduces the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings. It includes a detailed treatment of different forms of energy, energy conservation, properties of gases and liquids, air-water vapor mixtures and performance limits for air conditioning and power producing systems. Heat transfer principles are introduced with applications to energy losses from a building envelope. The subject is a prerequisite for more advanced thermo-science subjects in Architecture and Mechanical Engineering.

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning | air conditioning | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy conservation | energy conservation | heat transfer | heat transfer | energy losses from buildings | energy losses from buildings

License

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16.050 Thermal Energy (MIT) 16.050 Thermal Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is taught in four main parts. The first is a review of fundamental thermodynamic concepts (e.g. energy exchange in propulsion and power processes), and is followed by the second law (e.g. reversibility and irreversibility, lost work). Next are applications of thermodynamics to engineering systems (e.g. propulsion and power cycles, thermo chemistry), and the course concludes with fundamentals of heat transfer (e.g. heat exchange in aerospace devices). This course is taught in four main parts. The first is a review of fundamental thermodynamic concepts (e.g. energy exchange in propulsion and power processes), and is followed by the second law (e.g. reversibility and irreversibility, lost work). Next are applications of thermodynamics to engineering systems (e.g. propulsion and power cycles, thermo chemistry), and the course concludes with fundamentals of heat transfer (e.g. heat exchange in aerospace devices).

Subjects

energy exchange | energy exchange | propulsion | propulsion | power | power | second law | second law | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | reversible process | reversible process | irreversible process | irreversible process | irreversibility | irreversibility | lost work | lost work | first law | first law | cycles | cycles | energy transfer | energy transfer | heat exchange | heat exchange | energy conversion | energy conversion | entropy | entropy

License

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | thermo-sciences | thermo-sciences | energy | energy | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | electricity | electricity | architecture | architecture | building technology | building technology | civil engineering | civil engineering | buildings | buildings | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | air-water vapor mixtures | air-water vapor mixtures | thermal comfort | thermal comfort | heat pumps | heat pumps | refrigeration cycles | refrigeration cycles | thermodynamic performance | thermodynamic performance | heat transfer | heat transfer | creative design projects | creative design projects | air conditioning | air conditioning | energy consumption | energy consumption | building designs | building designs | building technologies | building technologies | operating schemes | operating schemes | properties of gases | properties of gases | properties of liquids | properties of liquids | power producing systems | power producing systems | energy losses | energy losses | building envelope | building envelope | 4.42 | 4.42 | 1.044 | 1.044 | 2.66 | 2.66

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

This design-based subject provides a first course in energy and thermo-sciences with applications to sustainable energy-efficient architecture and building technology. No previous experience with subject matter is assumed. After taking this subject, students will understand introductory thermodynamics and heat transfer, know the leading order factors in building energy use, and have creatively employed their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects. This year, the focus will be on design projects that will complement the new NSTAR/MIT campus efficiency program. This design-based subject provides a first course in energy and thermo-sciences with applications to sustainable energy-efficient architecture and building technology. No previous experience with subject matter is assumed. After taking this subject, students will understand introductory thermodynamics and heat transfer, know the leading order factors in building energy use, and have creatively employed their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects. This year, the focus will be on design projects that will complement the new NSTAR/MIT campus efficiency program.

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning | air conditioning | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy conservation | energy conservation | heat transfer | heat transfer | energy losses from buildings | energy losses from buildings

License

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12.950 Atmospheric and Oceanic Modeling (MIT) 12.950 Atmospheric and Oceanic Modeling (MIT)

Description

The numerical methods, formulation and parameterizations used in models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean will be described in detail. Widely used numerical methods will be the focus but we will also review emerging concepts and new methods. The numerics underlying a hierarchy of models will be discussed, ranging from simple GFD models to the high-end GCMs. In the context of ocean GCMs, we will describe parameterization of geostrophic eddies, mixing and the surface and bottom boundary layers. In the atmosphere, we will review parameterizations of convection and large scale condensation, the planetary boundary layer and radiative transfer. The numerical methods, formulation and parameterizations used in models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean will be described in detail. Widely used numerical methods will be the focus but we will also review emerging concepts and new methods. The numerics underlying a hierarchy of models will be discussed, ranging from simple GFD models to the high-end GCMs. In the context of ocean GCMs, we will describe parameterization of geostrophic eddies, mixing and the surface and bottom boundary layers. In the atmosphere, we will review parameterizations of convection and large scale condensation, the planetary boundary layer and radiative transfer.

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | formulation | formulation | parameterizations | parameterizations | models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean | models of the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean | numerics underlying a hierarchy of models | numerics underlying a hierarchy of models | simple GFD models | simple GFD models | high-end GCMs | high-end GCMs | ocean GCMs | ocean GCMs | parameterization of geostrophic eddies | parameterization of geostrophic eddies | mixing | mixing | surface and bottom boundary layers | surface and bottom boundary layers | atmosphere | atmosphere | parameterizations of convection | parameterizations of convection | large scale condensation | large scale condensation | planetary boundary layer | planetary boundary layer | radiative transfer | radiative transfer | finite difference method | finite difference method | Spatial discretization | Spatial discretization | numerical dispersion | numerical dispersion | Series expansion | Series expansion | Time-stepping | Time-stepping | Space-time discretization | Space-time discretization | Shallow water dynamics | Shallow water dynamics | Barotropic models | Barotropic models | Quasi-geostrophic equations | Quasi-geostrophic equations | Quasi-geostrophic models | Quasi-geostrophic models | Eddy parameterization | Eddy parameterization | Vertical coordinates | Vertical coordinates | primitive equations | primitive equations | Boundary layer parameterizations | Boundary layer parameterizations

License

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | black bodies | thermal radiation | external configurations | natural convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | black bodies | thermal radiation | external configurations | natural convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

License

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

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16.346 Astrodynamics (MIT) 16.346 Astrodynamics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course covers the fundamentals of astrodynamics, focusing on the two-body orbital initial-value and boundary-value problems with applications to space vehicle navigation and guidance for lunar and planetary missions, including both powered flight and midcourse maneuvers. Other topics include celestial mechanics, Kepler's problem, Lambert's problem, orbit determination, multi-body methods, mission planning, and recursive algorithms for space navigation. Selected applications from the Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Mars exploration programs are also discussed. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course covers the fundamentals of astrodynamics, focusing on the two-body orbital initial-value and boundary-value problems with applications to space vehicle navigation and guidance for lunar and planetary missions, including both powered flight and midcourse maneuvers. Other topics include celestial mechanics, Kepler's problem, Lambert's problem, orbit determination, multi-body methods, mission planning, and recursive algorithms for space navigation. Selected applications from the Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Mars exploration programs are also discussed.

Subjects

space navigation | space navigation | two body problem | two body problem | boundary value problem | boundary value problem | Kepler | Kepler | astrodynamics | astrodynamics | orbital transfer | orbital transfer | satellite | satellite | hyperbolic orbits | hyperbolic orbits | planetary flybys | planetary flybys | hypergeometric functions | hypergeometric functions | flight guidance | flight guidance | three body problem | three body problem | Clohessy-Wiltshire equation | Clohessy-Wiltshire equation | Hodograph plane | Hodograph plane | Battin-vaughan formulation | Battin-vaughan formulation | atmospheric drag | atmospheric drag | disturbing function | disturbing function

License

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2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT) 2.094 Finite Element Analysis of Solids and Fluids (MIT)

Description

This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course. This course presents finite element theory and methods for general linear and nonlinear analyses. Reliable and effective finite element procedures are discussed with their applications to the solution of general problems in solid, structural, and fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid-structure interactions. The governing continuum mechanics equations, conservation laws, virtual work, and variational principles are used to establish effective finite element discretizations and the stability, accuracy, and convergence are discussed. The homework and the student-selected term project using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ADINA are important parts of the course.

Subjects

linear static analysis | linear static analysis | solids | solids | structures | structures | nonlinear static analysis | nonlinear static analysis | heat transfer | heat transfer | fluid flows | fluid flows | finite element methods | finite element methods | ADINA | ADINA | student work | student work | beams | beams | plates | plates | shells | shells | displacement | displacement | conduction | conduction | convection | convection | radiation | radiation | Navier-Stokes | Navier-Stokes | incompressible fluids | incompressible fluids | acoustic fluids | acoustic fluids

License

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16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

The goal of this subject is to teach the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, students should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are "robust," that is, if they are likely to work well in practice. The goal of this subject is to teach the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, students should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are "robust," that is, if they are likely to work well in practice.

Subjects

feedback control | feedback control | feedback control system | feedback control system | state-space | state-space | controllability | controllability | observability | observability | transfer functions | transfer functions | canonical forms | canonical forms | controllers | controllers | pole-placement | pole-placement | optimal control | optimal control | Kalman filter | Kalman filter

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

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6.642 Continuum Electromechanics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on laws, approximations, and relations of continuum electromechanics. Topics include mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations, statics and dynamics of electromechanical systems having a static equilibrium, electromechanical flows, and field coupling with thermal and molecular diffusion. See the syllabus section for a more detailed list of topics.

Subjects

continuum mechanics | electromechanics | mechanical and electromechanical transfer relations | statics | dynamics | electromechanical systems | static equililbrium | electromechanical flows | field coupling | thermal and molecular diffusion | electrokinetics | streaming interactions | materials processing | magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic pumps and generators | ferrohydrodynamics | physiochemical systems | heat transfer | continuum feedback control | electron beam devices | plasma dynamics

License

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