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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets. This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | television | world markets | world markets | globalization | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | international cultural exchange | format trading | format trading | creativity of translation | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | cultural imports | media imperialism | media imperialism | production industires | production industires | economics | economics | cultural translation | cultural translation | universal texts | universal texts | trade flows | trade flows | adaptation | adaptation | subtitling | subtitling | genre | genre | transparency | transparency | diasporic media | diasporic media | American culture | American culture | local reception | local reception | response | response

License

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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT) 7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | lethal poison | Ricin | Ricin | Diphtheria | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | tetracycline | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | drug resistance | drug resistance | protein engineering | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | rRNA | mRNA | mRNA | tRNA | tRNA | translation factors | translation factors | genetic code | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside | Aminoglycoside

License

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7.28 Molecular Biology (MIT) 7.28 Molecular Biology (MIT)

Description

This course covers a detailed analysis of the biochemical mechanisms that control the maintenance, expression, and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The topics covered in lectures and readings of relevant literature include gene regulation, DNA replication, genetic recombination, and mRNA translation. In particular, the logic of experimental design and data analysis is emphasized. This course covers a detailed analysis of the biochemical mechanisms that control the maintenance, expression, and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The topics covered in lectures and readings of relevant literature include gene regulation, DNA replication, genetic recombination, and mRNA translation. In particular, the logic of experimental design and data analysis is emphasized.

Subjects

molecular biology | molecular biology | biochemical mechanisms | biochemical mechanisms | gene expression | gene expression | evolution | evolution | prokaryotic genome | prokaryotic genome | eukaryotic genomes | eukaryotic genomes | gene regulation | gene regulation | DNA replication | DNA replication | genetic recombination | genetic recombination | RNA processing | RNA processing | translation | translation | genome | genome

License

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7.03 Genetics (MIT) 7.03 Genetics (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease. This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Subjects

genetics | genetics | gene | gene | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | mutation | mutation | genome | genome | Watson and Crick | Watson and Crick | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | DNA heliz | DNA heliz | double helix | double helix | mRNA | mRNA | messenger RNA | messenger RNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | promoter | promoter | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | alleles | alleles | genotype | genotype | wild type | wild type | phenotype | phenotype | haploid | haploid | diploid | diploid | auxotrophic mutation | auxotrophic mutation | homozygous | homozygous | heterozygous | heterozygous | recessive allele | recessive allele | dominant allele | dominant allele | complementation test | complementation test | locus | locus | incomplete dominance | incomplete dominance | incomplete penetrance | incomplete penetrance | true-breeding | true-breeding | gametes | gametes | codominant | codominant | meiosis | meiosis

License

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT) 7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitination | ubiquitin | ubiquitin | proteasome | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | immune response | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | ligases | translocated proteins | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

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SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT) SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT)

Description

This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language. This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language.

Subjects

translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture | translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture

License

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Translation as Literature

Description

Matthew Reynolds, Fellow and Tutor in English Language and Literature, Oxford, gives a talk for the 2013 Oxford Alumni Weekend. Translations are never as good as their originals - or so we tend to think. But why should that be? Surely translation can involve gain as well as loss? But, if it does that, doesn't it stop being translation and turn into something else: a 'version', 'interpretation' or 'poem in its own right'? The 2013 St Anne's Founding Fellows Lecture will explore these questions with the help of a range of wonderful translations into English, such as Dante, Virgil, Homer, Sappho, Zamyatin, Sereni, Rouzeau, Dryden, Pope, Ciaran Carson, Natasha Randall, Peter Robinson and Susan Wickes. We will discover what it means for a piece of writing to be at once a translation and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

oxford | translation | literature | alumni | oxford | translation | literature | alumni

License

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21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT) 21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Ancient | Ancient | Greece | Greece | Bronze Age | Bronze Age | death | death | Alexander | Alexander | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | Homer | Homer | heroism | heroism | Greek | Greek | identity | identity | hoplite revolution | hoplite revolution | city-state | city-state | Herodotus | Herodotus | Persia | Persia | Empire | Empire | Thucydidean rationalism | Thucydidean rationalism | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Platonic constructs | Platonic constructs | Aristotle | Aristotle | Macedonia | Macedonia | Hellenism | Hellenism | primary sources | primary sources | translation. | translation.

License

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices. Analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations and state-determined systems. Laplace transforms, transfer functions. Frequency response, Bode plots. Vibrations, modal analysis. Open- and closed-loop control, instability. Time-domain controller design, introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications.Technical RequirementsQuickTime® Player software is required to view the .mov files found on this course site. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices. Analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations and state-determined systems. Laplace transforms, transfer functions. Frequency response, Bode plots. Vibrations, modal analysis. Open- and closed-loop control, instability. Time-domain controller design, introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications.Technical RequirementsQuickTime® Player software is required to view the .mov files found on this course site.

Subjects

electro-mechanical devices | electro-mechanical devices | electrical circuits | electrical circuits | uniaxial rotation | uniaxial rotation | Mechanical translation | Mechanical translation | linear differential equations | linear differential equations

License

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

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STS.360 Ethnography (MIT) STS.360 Ethnography (MIT)

Description

This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites. This course is a practicum-style seminar in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, the course is a mix of reading anthropological and science studies ethnographies; and formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | fieldwork | fieldwork | oral history | oral history | ethnomethodology | ethnomethodology | advertising | advertising | knowledge communities | knowledge communities | interviewing | interviewing | restudies | restudies | practicum | practicum | anthropological methods | anthropological methods | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic fieldwork | ethnographic writing | ethnographic writing | ethnographic reading | ethnographic reading | ethnographic practice | ethnographic practice | anthropological studies | anthropological studies | science studies | science studies | ethnographies | ethnographies | labs | labs | companies | companies | sites | sites | advocacy | advocacy | critique | critique | transference | transference | countertransference | countertransference | translation | translation | data | data | models | models | explanations | explanations | hypotheses | hypotheses | generalizations | generalizations | interpretations | interpretations | ethnography | ethnography

License

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | world markets | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | format trading | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | media imperialism | production industires | economics | cultural translation | universal texts | trade flows | adaptation | subtitling | genre | transparency | diasporic media | American culture | local reception | response

License

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3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity. This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity.

Subjects

crystallography | crystallography | rotation | rotation | translation | translation | lattice | lattice | plane | plane | point group | point group | space group | space group | motif | motif | glide plane | glide plane | mirror plane | mirror plane | reflection | reflection | spherical trigonometry | spherical trigonometry | binary compound | binary compound | coordination number | coordination number | ion | ion | crystal structure | crystal structure | tetrahedral | tetrahedral | octahedral | octahedral | packing | packing | monoclinic | monoclinic | triclinic | triclinic | orthorhombic | orthorhombic | cell | cell | screw axis | screw axis | eigenvector | eigenvector | stress | stress | strain | strain | anisotropy | anisotropy | anisotropic | anisotropic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric

License

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | analysis | analysis | dynamic | dynamic | systems | systems | mechanical | mechanical | translation | translation | uniaxial | uniaxial | rotation | rotation | electrical | electrical | circuits | circuits | coupling | coupling | levers | levers | gears | gears | electro-mechanical | electro-mechanical | devices | devices | linear | linear | differential | differential | equations | equations | state-determined | state-determined | Laplace | Laplace | transforms | transforms | transfer | transfer | functions | functions | frequency | frequency | response | response | Bode | Bode | vibrations | vibrations | modal | modal | open-loop | open-loop | closed-loop | closed-loop | control | control | instability | instability | time-domain | time-domain | controller | controller | frequency-domain | frequency-domain

License

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

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7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemical agents | geochemical agents | biosphere | biosphere | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | carbon metabolism | carbon metabolism | energy metabolism | energy metabolism | productivity | productivity | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | population genetics | population genetics | evolution | evolution | population growth | population growth | biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | ecology | ecology | communities | communities

License

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Is there a Core to Translation?

Description

First part of the What is Translation podcast series looking at translation of classical texts. In this part, the question of whether there is a core to translation; is there a central guiding idea to translation is discussed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

greek | translation | literature | roman | #greatwriters | greek | translation | literature | roman | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Is there ever a Faithful Translation?

Description

Second part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether there can be a faithful translation; does the act of translating a text change the meaning of the original is discussed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

homer | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | tragedy | greek | roman | translation | classics | fidelity | homer | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | tragedy | greek | roman | translation | classics | fidelity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Can Poetry be Translated?

Description

Third part of the What is Translation podcast series. In this part, the question of whether poetry be translated. Is there something within the original that is lost in the translation? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | theatre | poetry | greek | roman | translation | tragedy | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | greek | roman | translation | tragedy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Who Translates and for Whom?

Description

Fourth part of the What is Translation Podcast series. In this part, the question of who is best placed to translate classic texts; academics, poets, dramatists and who is best placed to receive the translation, students, scholars or the general public. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | theatre | poetry | drama | greek | roman | translation | classics | #greatwriters | theatre | poetry | drama | greek | roman | translation | classics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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