Searching for universality : 27 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Mechanics of Fields (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Mechanics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories. This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems | correlation functions | correlation functions | and scaling theory | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | international relations | international relations | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights. This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | human rights | public international law | public international law | history | history | international relations | international relations | universality | universality | cultural specificity | cultural specificity | NGO's | NGO's | duty-based | duty-based | rights | rights | social movements | social movements | law | law | sociology | sociology | political science | political science | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | government regulation | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT) 12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates. Beginning graduate students are encouraged to register for 12.586 (graduate version of 12.086). Students taking the graduate version complete different assignments. This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates. Beginning graduate students are encouraged to register for 12.586 (graduate version of 12.086). Students taking the graduate version complete different assignments.

Subjects

river networks | river networks | drainage basins | drainage basins | anomalous diffusion | anomalous diffusion | percolation theory | percolation theory | fractals | fractals | universality | universality | ecological dynamics | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | metabolic scaling | food webs | food webs | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Mechanics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | correlation functions | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.006J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos (MIT) 12.006J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering. This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering.

Subjects

Forced and parametric oscillators | Forced and parametric oscillators | Phase space | Phase space | Periodic | quasiperiodic | and aperiodic flows | Periodic | quasiperiodic | and aperiodic flows | Sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors | Sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors | Lorenz attractor | Lorenz attractor | Period doubling | intermittency | and quasiperiodicity | Period doubling | intermittency | and quasiperiodicity | Scaling and universality | Scaling and universality | Analysis of experimental data: Fourier transforms | Analysis of experimental data: Fourier transforms | Poincar? sections | Poincar? sections | fractal dimension | fractal dimension | Lyaponov exponents | Lyaponov exponents

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT) 12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

Subjects

river networks | river networks | drainage basins | drainage basins | percolation theory | percolation theory | fractals | fractals | universality | universality | ecological dynamics | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | metabolic scaling | food webs | food webs | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories. This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | correlation functions | and scaling theory | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT) 12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

Subjects

river networks | river networks | drainage basins | drainage basins | percolation theory | percolation theory | fractals | fractals | scaling | scaling | universality | universality | ecological dynamics | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | metabolic scaling | food webs | food webs | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.006J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos (MIT) 12.006J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering. This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering.

Subjects

Forced and parametric oscillators | Forced and parametric oscillators | Phase space | Phase space | Periodic | quasiperiodic | and aperiodic flows | Periodic | quasiperiodic | and aperiodic flows | Sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors | Sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors | Lorenz attractor | Lorenz attractor | Period doubling | intermittency | and quasiperiodicity | Period doubling | intermittency | and quasiperiodicity | Scaling and universality | Scaling and universality | Analysis of experimental data: Fourier transforms | Analysis of experimental data: Fourier transforms | Poincar? sections | Poincar? sections | fractal dimension | fractal dimension | Lyaponov exponents | Lyaponov exponents

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT) 12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

Subjects

river networks | river networks | drainage basins | drainage basins | percolation theory | percolation theory | fractals | fractals | universality | universality | ecological dynamics | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | metabolic scaling | food webs | food webs | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in this class, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored, including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in this class, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored, including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | correlation functions | and scaling theory | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II (MIT) 8.334 Statistical Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

Topics from modern statistical mechanics are explored in 8.334, Statistical Mechanics II, including:The hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality, correlation functions, and scaling theory.The renormalization approach to collective phenomena.Integrable models. Quantum phase transitions. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are explored in 8.334, Statistical Mechanics II, including:The hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality, correlation functions, and scaling theory.The renormalization approach to collective phenomena.Integrable models. Quantum phase transitions.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

Subjects

river networks | drainage basins | percolation theory | fractals | scaling | universality | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | food webs | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | public international law | history | international relations | universality | cultural specificity | NGO's | duty-based | rights | social movements | law | sociology | political science | policy dilemmas | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

Subjects

river networks | drainage basins | percolation theory | fractals | universality | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | food webs | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II (MIT)

Description

Topics from modern statistical mechanics are explored in 8.334, Statistical Mechanics II, including:The hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality, correlation functions, and scaling theory.The renormalization approach to collective phenomena.Integrable models. Quantum phase transitions.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in 8.334, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

Subjects

human rights | public international law | history | universality | cultural specificity | NGO's | duty-based | rights | social movements | law | international relations | sociology | political science | policy dilemmas | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.164 Human Rights: At Home and Abroad (MIT)

Description

This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement, as it has evolved through the years and as it impacts the United States. The course introduces students to the key theoretical debates in the field including the historical origin and character of the modern idea of human rights, the debate between universality and cultural relativism, between civil and human rights, between individual and community, and the historically contentious relationship between the West and the Rest in matters of sovereignty and human rights, drawing on real life examples from current affairs.

Subjects

human rights | public international law | history | international relations | universality | cultural specificity | NGO's | duty-based | rights | social movements | law | sociology | political science | policy dilemmas | government regulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.334 Statistical Mechanics II: Statistical Physics of Fields (MIT)

Description

This is the second term in a two-semester course on statistical mechanics. Basic principles are examined in this class, such as the laws of thermodynamics and the concepts of temperature, work, heat, and entropy. Topics from modern statistical mechanics are also explored, including the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories.

Subjects

the hydrodynamic limit and classical field theories | Phase transitions and broken symmetries: universality | correlation functions | and scaling theory | The renormalization approach to collective phenomena | Dynamic critical behavior | Random systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.006J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering.

Subjects

Forced and parametric oscillators | Phase space | Periodic | quasiperiodic | and aperiodic flows | Sensitivity to initial conditions and strange attractors | Lorenz attractor | Period doubling | intermittency | and quasiperiodicity | Scaling and universality | Analysis of experimental data: Fourier transforms | Poincar? sections | fractal dimension | Lyaponov exponents

License

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12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions. This course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates. Beginning graduate students are encouraged to register for 12.586 (graduate version of 12.086). Students taking the graduate version complete different assignments.

Subjects

river networks | drainage basins | anomalous diffusion | percolation theory | fractals | universality | ecological dynamics | metabolic scaling | food webs | biogeochemical cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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