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11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT) 11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | digital media | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology industrialization | mythology industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | architecture | architecture | modernism | modernism | typology | typology | form | form | space | space | grid | grid | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | Kevin Lynch | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | utopianism | utopianism | suburb | suburb | suburban development | suburban development

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class. Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology | mythology | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development | 4.241 | 4.241 | 11.330 | 11.330

License

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11.014J American Urban History II (MIT) 11.014J American Urban History II (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper. This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | white flight | white flight | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts | zoos | zoos | entertainment | entertainment | 11.014 | 11.014 | 21H.232 | 21H.232

License

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1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT) 1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT)

Description

1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation; resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems; and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infras 1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation; resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems; and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infras

Subjects

civil engineering project | civil engineering project | engineering economics | engineering economics | net present value | net present value | life-cycle costing | life-cycle costing | benefit-cost analysis | benefit-cost analysis | project evaluation | project evaluation | cost estimation | cost estimation | large-scale infrastructure | large-scale infrastructure | building design | building design | construction | construction | transportation systems | transportation systems | urban development | urban development | environmental projects | environmental projects | water resource management | water resource management

License

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1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT) 1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT)

Description

1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation, resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems, and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infra 1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation, resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems, and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infra

Subjects

civil engineering project | civil engineering project | engineering economics | engineering economics | net present value | net present value | life-cycle costing | life-cycle costing | benefit-cost analysis | benefit-cost analysis | project evaluation | project evaluation | cost estimation | cost estimation | large-scale infrastructure | large-scale infrastructure | building design | building design | construction | construction | transportation systems | transportation systems | urban development | urban development | environmental projects | environmental projects | water resource management | water resource management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future. This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | city | suburbs | suburbs | suburban sprawl | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | American metropolis | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | Boston | Boston | industrial cities | industrial cities | housing | housing | workplaces | workplaces | urban planning | urban planning | public spaces | public spaces | performance zoning | performance zoning | land use regulation | land use regulation | urban renewal | urban renewal | American public housing | American public housing | privatization | privatization | New Urbanism | New Urbanism | heritage areas | heritage areas | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | community activism | community activism | urban utopias | urban utopias | development controls | development controls | 11.001 | 11.001 | 4.250 | 4.250

License

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11.016J The City (MIT) 11.016J The City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | development | development | urban form | urban form | downtown | downtown | inner-city | inner-city | suburb | suburb | edge city | edge city | Boston | Boston | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

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11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.301J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This course introduces graduate students to ideas about the form of cities and how they are designed and developed. Part 1 explores the forces which act to shape and to change cities. Part 2 surveys models of urban design which have been invented in response to forces acting on cities. This course introduces graduate students to ideas about the form of cities and how they are designed and developed. Part 1 explores the forces which act to shape and to change cities. Part 2 surveys models of urban design which have been invented in response to forces acting on cities.

Subjects

cities | cities | Boston | Boston | American city | American city | market | market | social forces | social forces | public development | public development | regulation of private development | regulation of private development | incentives to encourage good design | incentives to encourage good design | plans | plans | proposals | proposals | case studies | case studies | field trips | field trips | Traditional City | Traditional City | the City as a Work of Art | the City as a Work of Art | the Efficient City | the Efficient City | the Garden City | the Garden City | the Secure City | the Secure City | the Information City | the Information City | Virtual City | Virtual City | urban analysis | urban analysis | urban design theory | urban design theory | implementation strategy | implementation strategy | private development | private development | regulation | regulation | models | models | modeling | modeling | urban development | urban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT) 4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies. This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | housing | urban planning | urban planning | city development | city development | urban history | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | New York City | London | London | Paris | Paris | tenements | tenements | slums | slums | row houses | row houses | court and garden | court and garden | country estate | country estate | urban development | urban development | modernism | modernism | city planning | city planning

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT) 1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT)

Description

1.011 Project Evaluation covers methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale and long-lived and involve many economic, financial, social and environmental factors. The course places an emphasis on dealing with uncertainty. Students learn basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical projects in various fields, including transportation systems, urban development, energy and environmental projects, water resource management, telecommunications systems, and other elements of the public and private projects and programs. 1.011 Project Evaluation covers methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale and long-lived and involve many economic, financial, social and environmental factors. The course places an emphasis on dealing with uncertainty. Students learn basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical projects in various fields, including transportation systems, urban development, energy and environmental projects, water resource management, telecommunications systems, and other elements of the public and private projects and programs.

Subjects

civil engineering project | civil engineering project | engineering economics | engineering economics | net present value | net present value | life-cycle costing | life-cycle costing | benefit-cost analysis | benefit-cost analysis | project evaluation | project evaluation | cost estimation | cost estimation | large-scale infrastructure | large-scale infrastructure | building design | building design | construction | construction | transportation systems | transportation systems | urban development | urban development | environmental projects | environmental projects | water resource management | water resource management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.014J American Urban History II (MIT) 11.014J American Urban History II (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper. This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subjects

11.014 | 11.014 | 21H.232 | 21H.232 | urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | "white flight" | "white flight" | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts | zoos | zoos | entertainment | entertainment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

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11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT) 11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

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11.953 Comparative Land Use and Transportation Planning (MIT) 11.953 Comparative Land Use and Transportation Planning (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the land use-transportation "interaction space" in metropolitan settings. The course aims to develop an understanding of relevant theories and analytical techniques, through the exploration of various cases drawn from different parts of the world. The course begins with an overview of the role of transportation in patterns of urban development and metropolitan growth. It introduces the concept of accessibility and related issues of individual and firm travel demand. Later in the semester, students will explore the influence of the metropolitan built environment on travel behavior and the role of transportation on metropolitan land development. The course will conclude with an examination of the implications of the land use-transportation interaction space for metro This course focuses on the land use-transportation "interaction space" in metropolitan settings. The course aims to develop an understanding of relevant theories and analytical techniques, through the exploration of various cases drawn from different parts of the world. The course begins with an overview of the role of transportation in patterns of urban development and metropolitan growth. It introduces the concept of accessibility and related issues of individual and firm travel demand. Later in the semester, students will explore the influence of the metropolitan built environment on travel behavior and the role of transportation on metropolitan land development. The course will conclude with an examination of the implications of the land use-transportation interaction space for metro

Subjects

land use | land use | transportation | transportation | metropolitan growth | metropolitan growth | growth trends | growth trends | urban development | urban development | planning institutions | planning institutions | travel behavior | travel behavior | influence of the built environment | influence of the built environment | forecasting | forecasting | accessibility | accessibility | travel demand | travel demand | financial instruments | financial instruments | transportation networks | transportation networks

License

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Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT) Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district. This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district.

Subjects

main streets | main streets | urban neighborhood decline | urban neighborhood decline | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | physical development tools | physical development tools | economic development tools | economic development tools | revitalization strategies | revitalization strategies | retail | retail | market analysis | market analysis | assets | assets | capacity assessment | capacity assessment | existing conditions analysis | existing conditions analysis | streetscapes | streetscapes | neighborhood image and identity | neighborhood image and identity | zoning | zoning | business development | business development | organization | organization | capacity building | capacity building | marketing | marketing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.234J Downtown (MIT) 21H.234J Downtown (MIT)

Description

This seminar focuses on downtowns in U.S. cities from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on downtown as an idea, place, and cluster of interests; on the changing character of downtown; and on recent efforts to rebuild it. Subjects to be considered will include subways, skyscrapers, highways, urban renewal, and retail centers. The focus will be on readings, discussions, and individual research projects. This seminar focuses on downtowns in U.S. cities from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on downtown as an idea, place, and cluster of interests; on the changing character of downtown; and on recent efforts to rebuild it. Subjects to be considered will include subways, skyscrapers, highways, urban renewal, and retail centers. The focus will be on readings, discussions, and individual research projects.

Subjects

21H.234 | 21H.234 | 11.339 | 11.339 | 11.026 | 11.026 | urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | "white flight" | "white flight" | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | architecture | modernism | typology | form | space | grid | industrialization | urban history | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | utopianism | suburb | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT) 11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.220 Urban Housing: Paris, London, New York (MIT)

Description

This class presents an analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications in Paris, London, and New York City from the seventeenth century to the present. The focus will be on three models: the French hotel, the London row house, and the New York City tenement and apartment building. Other topics covered will include twentieth-century housing reform movements and work by the London County Council, CIAM, and American public housing agencies.

Subjects

housing | urban planning | city development | urban history | seventeenth century to the present | New York City | London | Paris | tenements | slums | row houses | court and garden | country estate | urban development | modernism | city planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mapping the Olympic growth machine

Description

Theories of growth machines and urban regimes have informed the study of urban political economy for more than three decades, but these theories remain focused on intra-urban processes. Using a case study of the bidding process and the planning of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, we explore the transnational dimensions of the urban growth machine and explore common aspects between the growth machine and regime theory literature and the literatures on the entrepreneurial city and transnational urban policy transfers. Through its evolving networks with other urban regimes, Vancouver's growth machine provides a ready forum in which local elites can acquire specialized knowledge on new urban entrepreneurial strategies elsewhere. Actors situated in different parts of the local growt

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Vancouver 2010 | bidding process | event management | urbanisation | urban environment | architecture | urban development | politics | planning | regeneration | city marketing.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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Mapping the Olympic growth machine

Description

Theories of growth machines and urban regimes have informed the study of urban political economy for more than three decades, but these theories remain focused on intra-urban processes. Using a case study of the bidding process and the planning of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, we explore the transnational dimensions of the urban growth machine and explore common aspects between the growth machine and regime theory literature and the literatures on the entrepreneurial city and transnational urban policy transfers. Through its evolving networks with other urban regimes, Vancouver's growth machine provides a ready forum in which local elites can acquire specialized knowledge on new urban entrepreneurial strategies elsewhere. Actors situated in different parts of the local growt

Subjects

sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | bidding process | event management | urbanisation | urban environment | architecture | urban development | politics | planning | regeneration | city marketing | radar brookes | hlst | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | hlstoer | vancouver 2010 | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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