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11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT) 11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | digital media | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology industrialization | mythology industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development

License

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class. Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology | mythology | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development | 4.241 | 4.241 | 11.330 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | architecture | architecture | modernism | modernism | typology | typology | form | form | space | space | grid | grid | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | Kevin Lynch | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | utopianism | utopianism | suburb | suburb | suburban development | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

21H.104 | 21H.104 | 11.015 | 11.015 | riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism

License

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4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT) 4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT)

Description

This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic. This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic.

Subjects

vernacular architecture | vernacular architecture | ancient civilizations | ancient civilizations | urbanism | urbanism | cities | cities | buildings | buildings | design principles | design principles | architecture analysis | architecture analysis | classical civilizations | classical civilizations | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Asia | Asia | Islam | Islam | cathedrals | cathedrals

License

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | Lawrence | MA | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 21h.104 | 11.015 | 11.015

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Agência Geral do Ultramar Agência Geral do Ultramar

Description

Subjects

macau | macau | urbanismo | urbanismo | mário | mário | ultramar | ultramar | novais | novais | márionovais | márionovais | agênciageral | agênciageral

License

No known copyright restrictions

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | architecture | modernism | typology | form | space | grid | industrialization | urban history | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | utopianism | suburb | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 The Production of Space: Art, Architecture and Urbanism in Dialogue (MIT) 4.303 The Production of Space: Art, Architecture and Urbanism in Dialogue (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This seminar engages in the notion of space from various points of departure. The goal is first of all to engage in the term and secondly to examine possibilities of art, architecture within urban settings in order to produce what is your interpretation of space. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This seminar engages in the notion of space from various points of departure. The goal is first of all to engage in the term and secondly to examine possibilities of art, architecture within urban settings in order to produce what is your interpretation of space.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | urbanisml gender | urbanisml gender | space | space | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT) 21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism. This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subjects

21H.405 | 21H.405 | 11.012 | 11.012 | archaeology | archaeology | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | city | city | urban | urban | architecture | architecture | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | literary | literary | evidence | evidence | space | space | Athens | Athens | Paestum | Paestum | Pompeii | Pompeii | theoretical frameworks | theoretical frameworks | ancient urbanism | ancient urbanism | 21.405 | 21.405 | 11.021J | 11.021J | 11.02 | 11.02

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT) 21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism. This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subjects

21H.405 | 21H.405 | 11.012 | 11.012 | archaeology | archaeology | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | city | city | urban | urban | architecture | architecture | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | literary | literary | evidence | evidence | space | space | Athens | Athens | Paestum | Paestum | Pompeii | Pompeii | theoretical frameworks | theoretical frameworks | ancient urbanism | ancient urbanism | 21.405 | 21.405 | 11.021J | 11.021J | 11.02 | 11.02

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.183 Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop (MIT) 4.183 Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop (MIT)

Description

This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project. This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project.

Subjects

sustainable design | sustainable design | built environment | built environment | green design and technology | green design and technology | urbanism | urbanism | tectonics | tectonics | materials | materials | sustainability | sustainability | ecology | ecology | energy | energy | solar gain | solar gain | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | natural resources | natural resources | renewable energy | renewable energy | modern design | modern design | green design | green design | technology | technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.139 The City in Film (MIT) 11.139 The City in Film (MIT)

Description

Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization. Using film as a lens to explore and interpret various aspects of the urban experience in both the U.S. and abroad, this course presents a survey of important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present day, including changes in technology, bureaucracy, and industrialization; immigration and national identity; race, class, gender, and economic inequality; politics, conformity, and urban anomie; and planning, development, private property, displacement, sprawl, environmental degradation, and suburbanization.

Subjects

cities | cities | urban | urban | urban experience | urban experience | urbanism | urbanism | development | development | technology | technology | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | industrialization | industrialization | immigration | immigration | national identity | national identity | race | race | class | class | gender | gender | economic inequality | economic inequality | politics | politics | conformity | conformity | urban anomie | urban anomie | planning | planning | private property | private property | displacement | displacement | sprawl | sprawl | environmental degradation | environmental degradation | suburbanization | suburbanization | metropolis | metropolis | berlin symphony of a great city | berlin symphony of a great city | the crowd | the crowd | modern times | modern times | ladri di biciclette | ladri di biciclette | bicycle thieves | bicycle thieves | the naked city | the naked city | west side story | west side story | play time | play time | midnight cowboy | midnight cowboy | blade runner | blade runner | do the right thing | do the right thing | london | london | night on earth | night on earth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.123 Architectural Design, Level I: Perceptions and Processes (MIT) 4.123 Architectural Design, Level I: Perceptions and Processes (MIT)

Description

This studio explores the notion of in-between by engaging several relationships; the relationship between intervention and perception, between representation and notation and between the fixed and the temporal. In the Exactitude in Science, Jorge Luis Borges tells the perverse tale of the one to one scale map, where the desire for precision and power leads to the escalating production of larger and more accurate maps of the territory. For Jean Baudrillard, "The territory no longer precedes the map nor survives it. …it is the map that precedes the territory... and thus, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map." The map or the territory, left to ruin-shredding across the 'other', beautifully captures the tension between reality and representati This studio explores the notion of in-between by engaging several relationships; the relationship between intervention and perception, between representation and notation and between the fixed and the temporal. In the Exactitude in Science, Jorge Luis Borges tells the perverse tale of the one to one scale map, where the desire for precision and power leads to the escalating production of larger and more accurate maps of the territory. For Jean Baudrillard, "The territory no longer precedes the map nor survives it. …it is the map that precedes the territory... and thus, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map." The map or the territory, left to ruin-shredding across the 'other', beautifully captures the tension between reality and representati

Subjects

in-between | in-between | relationships | relationships | intervention and perception | intervention and perception | representation and notation | representation and notation | fixed and temporal | fixed and temporal | Borges | Borges | mapping | mapping | territory | territory | Baudrillard | Baudrillard | the 'other' | the 'other' | reality and representation | reality and representation | collective desire and territorial surface | collective desire and territorial surface | filter | filter | create | create | frame | frame | scale | scale | orient | orient | project | project | agency | agency | landscape | landscape | architecture | architecture | urbanism | urbanism | representation versus real | representation versus real | design | design | perception | perception | representation | representation | fixed | fixed | temporal | temporal | map | map | reality | reality | collective desire | collective desire | territorial surface | territorial surface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.337J Urban Design Policy and Action (MIT) 11.337J Urban Design Policy and Action (MIT)

Description

In this course we examine the relationship between public policy and urban design through readings, discussions, presentations, and papers. We also analyze the ways in which policies shape cities, and investigate how governments implement urban design. Students gain a critical understanding of both the complex system of governance within which urban design occurs and the effective tools available for creative intervention. In this course we examine the relationship between public policy and urban design through readings, discussions, presentations, and papers. We also analyze the ways in which policies shape cities, and investigate how governments implement urban design. Students gain a critical understanding of both the complex system of governance within which urban design occurs and the effective tools available for creative intervention.

Subjects

design policy | design policy | government | government | urban design policy | urban design policy | tools of government | tools of government | private developers | private developers | community groups | community groups | political culture | political culture | city design | city design | toolkits for urban design | toolkits for urban design | neighborhood design | neighborhood design | best practices | best practices | new urbanism | new urbanism | neighborhood unit | neighborhood unit | garden city | garden city

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.143 Immaterial Limits: Process and Duration (MIT) 4.143 Immaterial Limits: Process and Duration (MIT)

Description

This studio proposes to engage tectonics as a material process. By exploring transformation, indeterminacy and mutability inherent in material and landscape processes, students will be challenged to engage notions of duration as a design strategy for architecture and urbanism. While the second law of thermodynamics states that the material universe tends toward a state of increasing disorder, architects build and construct in opposition to these forces. Attempting to delay the processes of disorder, decay and collapse, tectonics is often seen as the embodied expression of an arrested moment the finite resolution of the building process. Yet the processes that enable and disable architecture extend beyond any arrested moment. A more detailed description can be found in the syllabus section. This studio proposes to engage tectonics as a material process. By exploring transformation, indeterminacy and mutability inherent in material and landscape processes, students will be challenged to engage notions of duration as a design strategy for architecture and urbanism. While the second law of thermodynamics states that the material universe tends toward a state of increasing disorder, architects build and construct in opposition to these forces. Attempting to delay the processes of disorder, decay and collapse, tectonics is often seen as the embodied expression of an arrested moment the finite resolution of the building process. Yet the processes that enable and disable architecture extend beyond any arrested moment. A more detailed description can be found in the syllabus section.

Subjects

urbanism | urbanism | studio | studio | tectonics | tectonics | material process | material process | indeterminacy and mutability inherent in material | indeterminacy and mutability inherent in material | notions of duration as a design strategy | notions of duration as a design strategy | architecture | architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.329 Social Theory and the City (MIT) 11.329 Social Theory and the City (MIT)

Description

This course explores how social theories of urban life can be related to the city's architecture and spaces. It is grounded in classic or foundational writings about the city addressing such topics as the public realm and public space, impersonality, crowds and density, surveillance and civility, imprinting time on space, spatial justice, and the segregation of difference. The aim of the course is to generate new ideas about the city by connecting the social and the physical, using Boston as a visual laboratory. Students are required to present a term paper mediating what is read with what has been observed. This course explores how social theories of urban life can be related to the city's architecture and spaces. It is grounded in classic or foundational writings about the city addressing such topics as the public realm and public space, impersonality, crowds and density, surveillance and civility, imprinting time on space, spatial justice, and the segregation of difference. The aim of the course is to generate new ideas about the city by connecting the social and the physical, using Boston as a visual laboratory. Students are required to present a term paper mediating what is read with what has been observed.

Subjects

sociology | sociology | urbanism | urbanism | identity | identity | public space | public space | private space | private space | social theory | social theory | cities | cities | regionalism | regionalism | immigration | immigration | integration | integration | craft | craft | architecture | architecture | universa design | universa design | subways | subways | gentrification | gentrification | infrastructure | infrastructure | exclusion | exclusion | racial politics | racial politics | anthropology | anthropology | biological determinism | biological determinism | center | center | perifery | perifery | photography | photography | repression | repression | protest | protest | inclusion | inclusion | modernism | modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans and Mega-Urban Landscapes (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans and Mega-Urban Landscapes (MIT)

Description

This course explores the physical, ecological, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of big plans and mega-urban landscapes in a global context. It uses local and international case studies to understand the process of making major changes to urban landscape and city fabric, and to regional landscape systems. It includes lectures by leading practitioners. The assignments consider planning and design strategies across multiple scales and time frames. This course explores the physical, ecological, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of big plans and mega-urban landscapes in a global context. It uses local and international case studies to understand the process of making major changes to urban landscape and city fabric, and to regional landscape systems. It includes lectures by leading practitioners. The assignments consider planning and design strategies across multiple scales and time frames.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | participatory planning | participatory planning | urban planning | urban planning | regional lanscape | regional lanscape | urban design | urban design | city planning | city planning | urbanism | urbanism | hurricane sandy | hurricane sandy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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aranda, J. L.) La Accin Administrativa en Sectores Especficos aranda, J. L.) La Accin Administrativa en Sectores Especficos

Description

En la asignatura "La Accin Administrativa en Sectores Especficos" se lleva a cabo una introduccin en los mbitos de referencia en los que se proyecta la accin administrativa. El objetivo es ofrecer una visin en vertical de las instituciones propias del Derecho administrativo que se estudian en horizontal en las asignaturas precedentes. En la asignatura "La Accin Administrativa en Sectores Especficos" se lleva a cabo una introduccin en los mbitos de referencia en los que se proyecta la accin administrativa. El objetivo es ofrecer una visin en vertical de las instituciones propias del Derecho administrativo que se estudian en horizontal en las asignaturas precedentes.

Subjects

nica Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad | nica Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad | nica 2/1986 | nica 2/1986 | Cuerpos y Fuerzas de Seguridad | Cuerpos y Fuerzas de Seguridad | Grado en Derecho | Grado en Derecho | n de impacto ambiental | n de impacto ambiental | n de servicios | n de servicios | a | a | Electricidad | Electricidad | Ley del Suelo | Ley del Suelo | n de industrias | n de industrias | stico | stico | 2014 | 2014 | n de la economa | n de la economa | Seguridad y calidad de la industria | Seguridad y calidad de la industria | a administrativa | a administrativa | blica | blica | n responsable | n responsable | Medio ambiente | Medio ambiente | blico del suelo | blico del suelo | n urbana | n urbana | sticas | sticas | Sectores en red | Sectores en red | ltimo recurso | ltimo recurso | Ley paraguas | Ley paraguas | n pblica | n pblica | blico | blico | ctrica Espaola | ctrica Espaola | Actividades clasificadas | Actividades clasificadas | nica 1/1992 | nica 1/1992 | Vigilantes de seguridad | Vigilantes de seguridad | Ley 54/1997 | Ley 54/1997 | Ley General de Telecomunicaciones | Ley General de Telecomunicaciones | Calidad industrial | Calidad industrial | Real Decreto Legislativo 2/2008 | Real Decreto Legislativo 2/2008 | Ley Omnibus | Ley Omnibus | Obligaciones de servicio publico | Obligaciones de servicio publico | Industria | Industria | Administraciones independientes | Administraciones independientes | n ambiental | n ambiental | Vivienda | Vivienda | Seguridad industrial | Seguridad industrial | Suelo no urbanizable | Suelo no urbanizable | blicos | blicos | n urbanstica | n urbanstica | Puertos | Puertos | Actividad de fomento | Actividad de fomento | ctrico | ctrico | Normas subsidiarias | Normas subsidiarias | Carreteras | Carreteras | n financiera | n financiera | Infraestructuras en red | Infraestructuras en red | as urbanismo | as urbanismo | n | n | n del territorio | n del territorio | Libre competencia | Libre competencia | n medio ambiental | n medio ambiental | s general | s general | n econmica | n econmica | Derecho Administrativo | Derecho Administrativo | Directiva de servicios | Directiva de servicios | Libertad de empresa | Libertad de empresa | n del planeamiento | n del planeamiento | Comunicaciones previas | Comunicaciones previas | Ley 25/2009 | Ley 25/2009 | Actividades de servicios | Actividades de servicios | Derecho de emisiones contaminantes | Derecho de emisiones contaminantes | stica | stica | a Nacional | a Nacional | Administraciones reguladoras | Administraciones reguladoras | Telecomunicaciones | Telecomunicaciones | blicas | blicas | Aeropuertos | Aeropuertos | gica | gica | Suelo urbano | Suelo urbano | Seguridad ciudadana | Seguridad ciudadana | Entes reguladores | Entes reguladores | n del suelo | n del suelo | Guardias de seguridad privada | Guardias de seguridad privada | Directiva Bolkestein | Directiva Bolkestein | Ley 17/2009 | Ley 17/2009 | Servicio universal | Servicio universal | Seguridad privada | Seguridad privada | Guardia Civil | Guardia Civil | Suelo urbanizable | Suelo urbanizable | Sectores regulados | Sectores regulados | n de la Seguridad Ciudadana | n de la Seguridad Ciudadana | Ley 32/2003 | Ley 32/2003 | Planes Especiales | Planes Especiales | Sistema europeo de bancos centrales | Sistema europeo de bancos centrales

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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4.647 Technopolitics, Culture, Intervention (MIT) 4.647 Technopolitics, Culture, Intervention (MIT)

Description

Twentieth and twenty-first century architecture is defined by its rhetorical subservience to something called "technology." Architecture relates to technology in multiple forms, as the organizational basis of society, as production system, as formal inspiration, as mode of temporization, as communicational vehicle, and so on. Managerial or "systems-based" paradigms for societal, industrial and governmental organization have routinely percolated into architecture's considerations, at its various scales from the urban to the domestic, of the relationships of parts to wholes. Twentieth and twenty-first century architecture is defined by its rhetorical subservience to something called "technology." Architecture relates to technology in multiple forms, as the organizational basis of society, as production system, as formal inspiration, as mode of temporization, as communicational vehicle, and so on. Managerial or "systems-based" paradigms for societal, industrial and governmental organization have routinely percolated into architecture's considerations, at its various scales from the urban to the domestic, of the relationships of parts to wholes.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | technology | technology | urbanism | urbanism | society | society | culture | culture | art | art | humanization | humanization | territory | territory | government | government | politics | politics | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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