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24.231 Ethics (MIT) 24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why? This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | ethics | euthyphro | euthyphro | Plato | Plato | goodness | goodness | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | David Brink | cognitivism | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | observation | morality | morality | moral relativism | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | David Lyons | incoherence | incoherence | ethical relativism | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | philosophy | Bernard Williams | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | James Lenman | consequentialism | consequentialism | cluelessness | cluelessness | Peter Singer | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | John Rawls | rules | rules | Thomas Nagel | Thomas Nagel | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | moral worth | Susan Wolf | Susan Wolf | moral saints | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | Peter van Inwagen | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | moral luck | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | euthyphro | Plato | goodness | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | morality | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | incoherence | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | consequentialism | cluelessness | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | rules | Thomas Nagel | famine | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | Susan Wolf | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | free will | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.04J Justice (MIT) 24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse. This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | social justice | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | entitlement | immigration | immigration | fairness | fairness | ghetto poor | ghetto poor | global poor | global poor | principles | principles | moral desert | moral desert | welfare contractualism | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality | pornography | pornography | free speech | free speech | hate speech | hate speech

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT) 11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution. This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution.

Subjects

Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | speech prosody | speech prosody | models for speech recognition | models for speech recognition | speech disorders | speech disorders | other topics | other topics | environment | environment | environmental planning | environmental planning | environmental policy | environmental policy | ethics | ethics | land use planning | land use planning | environmental management | environmental management | growth | growth | scarcity | scarcity | command and control | command and control | market forces | market forces | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deep ecology | deep ecology | expert knowledge | expert knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | land conservation | land conservation | sustainable design | sustainable design | growth management | growth management | hazard mitigation | hazard mitigation | ecosystem management | ecosystem management | geospatial data | geospatial data | stormwater management | stormwater management | runoff pollution | runoff pollution | landscape ecology | landscape ecology | biodiversity | biodiversity | integrated assessment | integrated assessment | professional practice | professional practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered. This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | just society | values of liberty | values of liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | religious liberty | labor markets | labor markets | health care | health care | affirmative action | affirmative action | abortion | abortion | global justice | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | famly | famly | vengeance | vengeance | retribution | retribution | reform | reform | punishment | punishment | prison | prison | body | body | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT) 17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | justice | justice | abortion | abortion | supreme court | supreme court | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 17.01 | 24.04 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Utilitarianism: Mill and the utility calculus

Description

Part 6 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". A reflection on Mill's account of morality, and the greatest happiness of the greatest number. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | 2011-03-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Utilitarianism: Mill and the utility calculus (Slides)

Description

Part 6 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". A reflection on Mill's account of morality, and the greatest happiness of the greatest number. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | 2011-03-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Utilitarianism: Mill and the utility calculus

Description

Part 6 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". A reflection on Mill's account of morality, and the greatest happiness of the greatest number. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | ethical | moral law | morals | philosophy | utilitarianism | ethics | mill | morality | 2011-03-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

Demand for health care is infinite, but money is finite. So how should we distribute resources? Whom should we help, and why? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Jo Wolff | utilitarianism | drugs | Bio-Ethics | Health | Fairness | politics | Jo Wolff | utilitarianism | drugs | Bio-Ethics | Health | Fairness | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | desire | satisfaction | objectivity | environmentalism | animal rights | immortality | egoism | skepticism | relativism | toleration | utilitarianism | deontology | virtue | moral theory | global justice | equality | social justice | race | gender | poverty | sex | welfare | freedom | famly | vengeance | retribution | reform | punishment | prison | body | Michel Foucault | John Stuart Mill | death penalty | gay marriage | sexuality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society:Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? Political liberty?What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? Equality of opportunity? Of economic outcome? Political equality?Can a society ensure both liberty and equality? Or are these warring political values?We will approach these questions by examining answers to them provided by three contemporary theories of justice: utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism. To clarify these theories, and assess their strengths and weaknesses, we will discuss their implications for some issues about liberty and equality that are topics of current controver

Subjects

John Stewart Mill | | Jeremy Bentham | | Jeremy Bentham | justice | abortion | supreme court | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | 17.01 | 24.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | desire | satisfaction | objectivity | environmentalism | animal rights | immortality | egoism | skepticism | relativism | toleration | utilitarianism | deontology | virtue | moral theory | global justice | equality | social justice | race | gender | poverty | sex | welfare | freedom | death penalty | gay marriage | sexuality | pornography | free speech | hate speech

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.01 Classics of Western Philosophy (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition through the study of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Cavendish, Hume, and Kant. You'll grapple with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: Questions about the nature of the mind, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, and the good life. You'll also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious, and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas.

Subjects

Plato | Aristotle | Descartes | Cavendish | Hume | Kant | god | existence of god | Socrates | Margaret Cavendish | John Stuart Mill | W.E.B. Du Bois | Simone de Beauvoir | utilitarianism | slavery | women's rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moral and Political Philosophy

Description

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 103)

Subjects

ethics | morality | intuition | consequentialism | utilitarianism | jeremy bentham | john stuart mill | libertarianism | free market | milton friedman | john locke | individual right | immanuel kant | feminist perspectives | reproductive rights | john rawls | social contract | justice | difference principle | affirmative action | profiling | virtue | disability | marriage | patriotism | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Contemporary Political Thought

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the major political theorists and their work from the 18th century to the present. Common themes seen in contemporary political thought include governance, property ownership and redistribution, free enterprise, individual liberty, justice, and responsibility for the common welfare. The student will read the works of theorists advocating capitalism, socialism, communism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, social contract theory, liberalism, conservatism, neo-liberalism, neo-conservatism, libertarianism, fascism, anarchy, rational choice theory, and globalism. By studying the evolving constructs of political theory in the past two centuries, the student will gain insight into different approaches that leaders use to so

Subjects

political thought | political theory | political philosophy | political science | sovereignty | government | democracy | civil liberties | capitalism | utilitarianism | marxism | communism | authoritarianism | fascism | libertarianism | neoliberalism | globalization | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | liberty | equality | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | immigration | fairness | ghetto poor | global poor | principles | moral desert | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution.

Subjects

Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | speech prosody | models for speech recognition | speech disorders | other topics | environment | environmental planning | environmental policy | ethics | land use planning | environmental management | growth | scarcity | command and control | market forces | utilitarianism | deep ecology | expert knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | land conservation | sustainable design | growth management | hazard mitigation | ecosystem management | geospatial data | stormwater management | runoff pollution | landscape ecology | biodiversity | integrated assessment | professional practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.01J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

Subjects

just society | values of liberty | equality | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | moral-political controversy | sexual morality | financing schools and elections | religious liberty | labor markets | health care | affirmative action | abortion | global justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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