Searching for utopia : 25 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.210 Precedents in Critical Practice (MIT) 4.210 Precedents in Critical Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop a map of contemporary architectural practice and discourse. The seminar examines six themes in terms of their recent history: city and global economy, urban plan and map of operations, program and performance, drawing and scripting, image and surface, and utopia and projection. Students will study buildings and read relevant texts in order to place recent architectural projects in disciplinary and cultural context. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop a map of contemporary architectural practice and discourse. The seminar examines six themes in terms of their recent history: city and global economy, urban plan and map of operations, program and performance, drawing and scripting, image and surface, and utopia and projection. Students will study buildings and read relevant texts in order to place recent architectural projects in disciplinary and cultural context.

Subjects

architectural criticism | architectural criticism | manifesto | manifesto | contemporary architecture | contemporary architecture | architectural practice | architectural practice | city | city | global economy | global economy | urban plan | urban plan | map | map | drawing | drawing | scripting | scripting | utopia | utopia | program | program | performance | performance | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT) 4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT)

Description

This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems. This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems.

Subjects

4.110 | 4.110 | MAS.330 | MAS.330 | design | design | media | media | animation | animation | image | image | data | data | visualization | visualization | representation | representation | database | database | Processing | Processing | fabrication | fabrication | technology | technology | systems | systems | model | model | AI | AI | intelligence | intelligence | programming | programming | optimization | optimization | machine | machine | play | play | game | game | utopia | utopia | future | future | dystopia | dystopia | science fiction | science fiction | environment | environment | growth | growth | organization | organization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | territory | cities | context | local | national | global | urban settings | city design | social justice | politics of change | urban design | history | theory | territorial settings | urbanites | city dwellers | inhabitants | nestedness | regional | imperial | politics | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future. This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | city | suburbs | suburbs | suburban sprawl | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | American metropolis | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | Boston | Boston | industrial cities | industrial cities | housing | housing | workplaces | workplaces | urban planning | urban planning | public spaces | public spaces | performance zoning | performance zoning | land use regulation | land use regulation | urban renewal | urban renewal | American public housing | American public housing | privatization | privatization | New Urbanism | New Urbanism | heritage areas | heritage areas | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | community activism | community activism | urban utopias | urban utopias | development controls | development controls | 11.001 | 11.001 | 4.250 | 4.250

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT) 11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | digital media | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology industrialization | mythology industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | east asia | zen | zen | japanese arts | japanese arts | confucianism | confucianism | literati | literati | imperial china | imperial china | material cutlure | material cutlure | westernization | westernization | globalization | globalization | japanization | japanization | tradition | tradition | weddings | weddings | science fiction | science fiction | food | food | cuisine | cuisine | utopia | utopia | dystopia | dystopia | post-mao china | post-mao china | china | china | japan | japan | korea | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT) 21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology? This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Subjects

speculative fiction | speculative fiction | vampires | vampires | cyborgs | cyborgs | utopias | utopias | dystopias | dystopias | time travel | time travel | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | futurism | futurism | reproduction | reproduction | extraterrestrials | extraterrestrials | race | race | religion | religion | alienation | alienation | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

World (MIT) World (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to studies in science, technology, and society (STS), through examining a series of issues, events, conflicts, and problems as illuminated by STS approaches. This iteration includes units on the Aaron Swartz case, photography, and utopia / dystopia. There are regular guest speakers, and several field trips to encourage hands on learning. This class is an introduction to studies in science, technology, and society (STS), through examining a series of issues, events, conflicts, and problems as illuminated by STS approaches. This iteration includes units on the Aaron Swartz case, photography, and utopia / dystopia. There are regular guest speakers, and several field trips to encourage hands on learning.

Subjects

sts | sts | science technology and society | science technology and society | aaron swartz | aaron swartz | photography | photography | utopia | utopia | dystopia | dystopia | archives | archives | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | reflexivity | reflexivity | two cultures | two cultures | technics | technics | technological determinism | technological determinism | actor network | actor network | semantic void | semantic void | reification | reification

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class. Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology | mythology | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development | 4.241 | 4.241 | 11.330 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | east asia | zen | zen | japanese arts | japanese arts | confucianism | confucianism | literati | literati | imperial china | imperial china | material cutlure | material cutlure | westernization | westernization | globalization | globalization | japanization | japanization | tradition | tradition | weddings | weddings | science fiction | science fiction | food | food | cuisine | cuisine | utopia | utopia | dystopia | dystopia | post-mao china | post-mao china | china | china | japan | japan | korea | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | architecture | architecture | modernism | modernism | typology | typology | form | form | space | space | grid | grid | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | Kevin Lynch | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | utopianism | utopianism | suburb | suburb | suburban development | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT)

Description

This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems.

Subjects

4.110 | MAS.330 | design | media | animation | image | data | visualization | representation | database | Processing | fabrication | technology | systems | model | AI | intelligence | programming | optimization | machine | play | game | utopia | future | dystopia | science fiction | environment | growth | organization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | architecture | modernism | typology | form | space | grid | industrialization | urban history | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | utopianism | suburb | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.210 Precedents in Critical Practice (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop a map of contemporary architectural practice and discourse. The seminar examines six themes in terms of their recent history: city and global economy, urban plan and map of operations, program and performance, drawing and scripting, image and surface, and utopia and projection. Students will study buildings and read relevant texts in order to place recent architectural projects in disciplinary and cultural context.

Subjects

architectural criticism | manifesto | contemporary architecture | architectural practice | city | global economy | urban plan | map | drawing | scripting | utopia | program | performance | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cultural and Literary Expression in the English Renaissance

Description

At the outset of the 16th century, Europeans tended to dismiss English literature as inferior to continental literary traditions; the educated Englishman was obliged to travel to the continent and speak in other languages in order to “culture” himself. By the end of the Renaissance, however, some of the greatest works in the English language—from Shakespeare’s dramas to Thomas More’s Utopia—had been written. In this course, the student will read and examine these works, situating them within their socio-historical and literary contexts, while attempting to determine how the art of English language and letters came into its own during this dynamic period. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English

Subjects

renaissance | humanism | utopianism | literacy | reformation | religion | elizabethan england | prose | polemical | more | lyly | euphuism | foxe | protestantism | raleigh | poetry | sonnet | metaphysical | lyrical | theater | masque | marlowe | shakespeare | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

World (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to studies in science, technology, and society (STS), through examining a series of issues, events, conflicts, and problems as illuminated by STS approaches. This iteration includes units on the Aaron Swartz case, photography, and utopia / dystopia. There are regular guest speakers, and several field trips to encourage hands on learning.

Subjects

sts | science technology and society | aaron swartz | photography | utopia | dystopia | archives | interdisciplinary | reflexivity | two cultures | technics | technological determinism | actor network | semantic void | reification

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | zen | japanese arts | confucianism | literati | imperial china | material cutlure | westernization | globalization | japanization | tradition | weddings | science fiction | food | cuisine | utopia | dystopia | post-mao china | china | japan | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Subjects

speculative fiction | vampires | cyborgs | utopias | dystopias | time travel | sexuality | gender | futurism | reproduction | extraterrestrials | race | religion | alienation | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | suburbs | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | urban design | urban development | Boston | industrial cities | housing | workplaces | urban planning | public spaces | performance zoning | land use regulation | urban renewal | American public housing | privatization | New Urbanism | heritage areas | environmental regulation | community activism | urban utopias | development controls | 11.001 | 4.250

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21F.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | zen | japanese arts | confucianism | literati | imperial china | material cutlure | westernization | globalization | japanization | tradition | weddings | science fiction | food | cuisine | utopia | dystopia | post-mao china | china | japan | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21F.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both premodern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.).

Subjects

east asia | zen | japanese arts | confucianism | literati | imperial china | material cutlure | westernization | globalization | japanization | tradition | weddings | science fiction | food | cuisine | utopia | dystopia | post-mao china | china | japan | korea

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21F.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.947 Imaging the City: The Place of Media in City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Kevin Lynch's landmark volume, The Image of the City (1960), emphasized the perceptual characteristics of the urban environment, stressing the ways that individuals mentally organize their own sensory experience of cities. Increasingly, however, city imaging is supplemented and constructed by exposure to visual media, rather than by direct sense experience of urban realms. City images are not static, but subject to constant revision and manipulation by a variety of media-savvy individuals and institutions. In recent years, urban designers (and others) have used the idea of city image proactively -- seeking innovative ways to alter perceptions of urban, suburban, and regional areas. City imaging, in this sense, is the process of constructing visually-based narratives about the potential of

Subjects

digital media | cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata