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Who is the Terrorist? Memories, Victims and the Use of Legitimate Violence

Description

Dr Diego Muro, Santander Visiting Fellow, St. Antony's College, University of Oxford, gives a talk for the OTJR Seminar Series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

legitimate violence | justice | violence | legitimacy | transitional justice | terrorism | war | legitimate violence | justice | violence | legitimacy | transitional justice | terrorism | war

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT) CMS.840 At the Limit: Violence in Contemporary Representation (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States,

Subjects

violence | violence | serial | serial | killer | killer | psycho | psycho | masculinity | masculinity | white | white | sex | sex | rape | rape | assault | assault | underclass | underclass | boredom | boredom | repetition | repetition | America | America | Ellis | Ellis | Palahniuk | Palahniuk | fight | fight | club | club | Cooper | Cooper | frisk | frisk | Sontag | Sontag | pain | pain | ultraviolence | ultraviolence | squib | squib | metaphor | metaphor | Fargo | Fargo | Coen | Coen | Benjamin | Benjamin | commodities | commodities | blankness | blankness | beast | beast | Manson | Manson | portraits | portraits | signs | signs | Henry | Henry | Se7en | Se7en | Pitt | Pitt | Fincher | Fincher | desire | desire | fragmentation | fragmentation | television | television | TV | TV | reality | reality | culpability | culpability | Bazin | Bazin | Resevoir | Resevoir | Tarantino | Tarantino | postmodern | postmodern | gore | gore | cartoon | cartoon | humor | humor | Oldboy | Oldboy | Haneke | Haneke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT) 21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery. This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery.

Subjects

21A.445 | 21A.445 | WGS.272 | WGS.272 | slavery | slavery | human trafficking | human trafficking | sex | sex | gender | gender | human rights | human rights | race | race | capitalism | capitalism | labor exploitation | labor exploitation | public health | public health | violence | violence | child labor | child labor | organ trafficking | organ trafficking | sexual violence | sexual violence | prostitution | prostitution | white slavery | white slavery | abolitionism | abolitionism | migration | migration | border crossings | border crossings | border policing | border policing | conflict zones | conflict zones | reproductive labor | reproductive labor | sex work | sex work | technology and trafficking | technology and trafficking

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Price of Omission: Brazilian Government Reparations to Victims of the Military Regime: Oak Series on Amnesty

Description

Dr. Glenda Mezarobba, Research Fellow, Universidade de Campinas; Executive Director,. 'The Role of the US in the Structure of Global Governance' project, National Institute of Science and Technology for US Studies gives a talk for the OTJR Seminar Series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

brazil | human rights | justice | violence | transitional justice | amnesty | law | war | conflict | brazil | human rights | justice | violence | transitional justice | amnesty | law | war | conflict

License

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s Conflict Zones

Description

This podcast was recorded at the Refugee Studies Centre's 2nd Astor Lecture which was on Tuesday 25th January 2011 at The Taylor Institute, University of Oxford. This podcast was recorded at the Refugee Studies Centre's 2nd Astor Lecture which was on Tuesday 25th January 2011 at The Taylor Institute, University of Oxford. Sondra Hale, Professor of Anthropology and Women's Studies, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) gave the lecture on the subject of Gendered Violence and the Politics of Memory in Sudan's Conflict Zones. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

violence | Sudan | gender | refugee | humanitarian | Africa | gendered | migration | memory | politics | forced migration | conflict | violence | Sudan | gender | refugee | humanitarian | Africa | gendered | migration | memory | politics | forced migration | conflict | 2011-01-16

License

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Killing in Humanitarian Wars

Description

Professor Cecile Fabre, Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, Lincoln College Oxford University, gives a talk for the ELAC/CCW lunchtime seminar series on the 3rd May, 2011. Introduced by Dr David Rodin. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

violence | humanitarianism | politics | war | conflict | United Nations | violence | humanitarianism | politics | war | conflict | United Nations | 2010-05-03

License

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Opportunistic violence and the impossibility of intimacy

Description

In this Anthropology Departmental Seminar, Dhana Hughes (St John's College, University of Oxford) examines 'memories of revenge and denunciation in Sri Lanka's Southern Terror'. 11 May 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

sri lanka | terror | violence | anthropology | society | sri lanka | terror | violence | anthropology | society

License

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender | gender | transsexual | transsexual | women's movement | women's movement | women's rights | women's rights | declaration of independence | declaration of independence | madness | madness | illness | illness | patriarchy | patriarchy | female pathology | female pathology | socialization | socialization | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | gender roles | gender roles | social construction | social construction | biological essentialism | biological essentialism | embodiment | embodiment | body image | body image | representation of women | representation of women | sexuality | sexuality | reproductive politics | reproductive politics | work | work | violence | violence | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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On Free Speech 1: Deletion and Denialism

Description

Free Speech Debate's monthly podcast features a round-up of interviews on the site including Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales, former Formula One boss Max Mosley and Chinese scholar Yan Xuetong. Hosts Brian Pellot and Katie Engelhart speak to Viktor Mayer-Schönberger about his new book Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age and discuss Aids denialism with FSD team member Casey Selwyn. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

facebook | information | violence | digital | wikipedia | free | Google | speech | internet | politics | anonymity | facebook | information | violence | digital | wikipedia | free | Google | speech | internet | politics | anonymity

License

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT) 17.586 Warlords, Terrorists, and Militias: Theorizing on Violent Non-State Actors (MIT)

Description

This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the This course is a general overview of the recent political science literature on violent non-state actors. Its aim is to examine why non-state actors (such as warlords, terrorists, militias, etc.) resort to violence, what means and tactics they use, and what can be done to counter that violence. In that regard, the class will cover works pertaining to the production side of non-state violence (i.e. the objectives and organization of insurgents/terrorists/militias/warlords, their mobilization strategies and support base, how they coerce opponents, etc.); as well as the response that violence elicits from governments or other actors (i.e. counter-insurgency or counter-terrorism strategies, among others). Apart from introducing the basic variables and theoretical and empirical findings in the

Subjects

terrorism | terrorism | non-state actors | non-state actors | state-sponsored terrorism | state-sponsored terrorism | suicide terrorism | suicide terrorism | militias | militias | warlords | warlords | terrorists | terrorists | insurgents | insurgents | terror networks | terror networks | political violence | political violence | collective action | collective action | terrorist strategies | terrorist strategies | Mujahideen | Mujahideen | jihad | jihad | hamas | hamas | al-Qaida | al-Qaida | Hezbollah | Hezbollah | counterterrorism | counterterrorism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.436 Territorial Conflict (MIT) 17.436 Territorial Conflict (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar introduces an emerging research program within International Relations on territorial conflict. While scholars have recognized that territory has been one of the most frequent issues over which states go to war, territorial conflicts have only recently become the subject of systematic study. This course will examine why territorial conflicts arise in the first place, why some of these conflicts escalate to high levels of violence and why other territorial disputes reach settlement, thereby reducing the likelihood of war. Readings in the course draw upon political geography and history as well as qualitative and quantitative approaches to political science. This graduate seminar introduces an emerging research program within International Relations on territorial conflict. While scholars have recognized that territory has been one of the most frequent issues over which states go to war, territorial conflicts have only recently become the subject of systematic study. This course will examine why territorial conflicts arise in the first place, why some of these conflicts escalate to high levels of violence and why other territorial disputes reach settlement, thereby reducing the likelihood of war. Readings in the course draw upon political geography and history as well as qualitative and quantitative approaches to political science.

Subjects

International Relations | International Relations | territorial conflict | territorial conflict | states | states | war | war | violence | violence | political geography | political geography | history | history | qualitative | qualitative | quantitative | quantitative | methods | methods | political science | political science | nationalism | nationalism | homelands | homelands | revisionism | revisionism | expansion | expansion | Empirics | Empirics | Boundary Management | Boundary Management | Diversion | Diversion | Domestic Mobilization | Domestic Mobilization | Anarchy | Anarchy | Power. | Power.

License

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

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21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT) 21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state. This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | political | political | violence | violence | human rights | human rights | freedom | freedom | peace | peace | justice | justice | citizens | citizens | state | state | historical debates | historical debates | cultural | cultural | natural | natural | western European | western European | moral values | moral values | differences | differences | culture | culture | religion | religion | gender | gender | relationships | relationships | individuals | individuals | collective groups | collective groups | ethnography | ethnography | case studies | case studies | conflict | conflict | globe | globe | war crimes tribunals | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | truth commissions | individual | individual | collective | collective | traumas | traumas | rule of law | rule of law | representative governance | representative governance | 21A.225 | 21A.225 | SP.621 | SP.621

License

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21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT) 21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT)

Description

We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate. We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate.

Subjects

21A.230 | 21A.230 | WGS.456 | WGS.456 | ameican family | ameican family | anthropology | anthropology | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | united states | united states | class | class | ethnicity | ethnicity | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | marriage | marriage | parenting | parenting | divorce | divorce | violence | violence | economics | economics | poverty | poverty | policy | policy | values | values | welfare | welfare | day care | day care | SP.456J | SP.456J | WMN.456J | WMN.456J | SP.456 | SP.456 | WMN.456 | WMN.456

License

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How can far-right extremism be tackled through policy? Lessons from 10 EU countries

Description

In recent years, many European countries have been grimly reminded of the threat from far-right violence motivated by hatred towards migrants and minorities. This talk explores how 10 European countires are attempting to address this. Amongst other events, the attacks on Oslo in July 2011 and the discovery of the National Socialist Underground in Germany have fed the fear that right-wing violence is on the rise, and raised questions about whether this form of extremism has been a blind spot for European policy makers and security officials. This briefing sets out the results of a 2-year research project, funded by the European Commission, to assess policy and practitioner approaches to far-right extremism across 10 EU countries (UK, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Germa Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

hate crime | racism | violence | far right | extemism | neo-nazi | politics | europe | european union | hate crime | racism | violence | far right | extemism | neo-nazi | politics | europe | european union | 2014-03-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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