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7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT) 7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about

Subjects

HIV | HIV | mycobacterium tuberculosis | mycobacterium tuberculosis | malaria | malaria | influenza | influenza | immune system | immune system | pathogens | pathogens | viruses | viruses | bacteria | bacteria | parasites | parasites | microbes | microbes | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | MHC I/II antigen presentation | MHC I/II antigen presentation | Salmonella | Salmonella | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | PAMP | PAMP | Toll-like receptors | Toll-like receptors | TLR | TLR | Vaccinia virus | Vaccinia virus | Proteasome | Proteasome | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | DUB | DUB | Herpes simplex virus | Herpes simplex virus | HSV | HSV | Yersinia | Yersinia | viral budding | viral budding | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | HCMV | HCMV | Histocompatiblity | Histocompatiblity | AIDS | AIDS | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Mixoma virus | Mixoma virus | Epstein Barr virus | Epstein Barr virus | EBV | EBV | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

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7.340 Nano-life: An Introduction to Virus Structure and Assembly (MIT) 7.340 Nano-life: An Introduction to Virus Structure and Assembly (MIT)

Description

Watson and Crick noted that the size of a viral genome was insufficient to encode a protein large enough to encapsidate it and reasoned, therefore that a virus shell must be composed of multiple, but identical subunits. Today, high resolution structures of virus capsids reveal the basis of this genetic economy as a highly symmetrical structure, much like a geodesic dome composed of protein subunits. Crystallographic structures and cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions combined with molecular data are beginning to reveal how these nano-structures are built. Topics covered in the course will include basic principles of virus structure and symmetry, capsid assembly, strategies for enclosing nucleic acid, proteins involved in entry and exit, and the life cycles of well understood pathogens Watson and Crick noted that the size of a viral genome was insufficient to encode a protein large enough to encapsidate it and reasoned, therefore that a virus shell must be composed of multiple, but identical subunits. Today, high resolution structures of virus capsids reveal the basis of this genetic economy as a highly symmetrical structure, much like a geodesic dome composed of protein subunits. Crystallographic structures and cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions combined with molecular data are beginning to reveal how these nano-structures are built. Topics covered in the course will include basic principles of virus structure and symmetry, capsid assembly, strategies for enclosing nucleic acid, proteins involved in entry and exit, and the life cycles of well understood pathogens

Subjects

viruses | viruses | virus structure | virus structure | virus assembly | virus assembly | virus shell | virus shell | virus genome | virus genome | capsids | capsids | capsid assembly | capsid assembly | TEM | TEM | transmission electron microscopy | transmission electron microscopy | nano-life | nano-life | nano-structures | nano-structures | virus symmetry | virus symmetry | icosahedral virus | icosahedral virus | electron cryotomography | electron cryotomography | nucleic acid packaging | nucleic acid packaging

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol 7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol

Subjects

biochemistry | biochemistry | molecular biology | molecular biology | genetics | genetics | human genetics | human genetics | pedigrees | pedigrees | biochemical genetics | biochemical genetics | chemical biology | chemical biology | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | recombinant DNA technology | recombinant DNA technology | cell biology | cell biology | cancer | cancer | viruses | viruses | HIV | HIV | bacteria | bacteria | antibiotics | antibiotics | human health | human health | therapeutic intervention | therapeutic intervention | cell signaling | cell signaling | evolution | evolution | reproduction | reproduction | infectious diseases | infectious diseases | therapeutics | therapeutics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Living with the internet: Keeping it safe Living with the internet: Keeping it safe

Description

Computer crashes are often the result of viruses, worms or trojans as unfortunately some internet users want to cause havoc or vandalise your computer. This free course, Living with the internet: Keeping it safe, provides a guide to the downsides of living with the 'net'. Advice on how to deal with these dangers is provided and security issues like spyware and adware are explained. The unit also deals with protecting children online, and provides links to various helpful websites which deal with the problems raised. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the internet: Keeping it safe. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Computer crashes are often the result of viruses, worms or trojans as unfortunately some internet users want to cause havoc or vandalise your computer. This free course, Living with the internet: Keeping it safe, provides a guide to the downsides of living with the 'net'. Advice on how to deal with these dangers is provided and security issues like spyware and adware are explained. The unit also deals with protecting children online, and provides links to various helpful websites which deal with the problems raised. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the internet: Keeping it safe. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Information and Communication Technologies | Information and Communication Technologies | internet | internet | warehousing | warehousing | security | security | viruses (viri) | viruses (viri)

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Immunology basics Immunology basics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn semester 2009 Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The body fights infection through the functions of the immune system, whose power has been harnessed by the development of vaccination (immunisation). Suitable for study at: Undergraduate levels 1 and 2. Dr Ian Todd, School of Molecular Medical Sciences Dr Ian Todd is Associate Professor & Reader in Cellular Immunopathology at The University of Nottingham. After reading Biochemistry at The University of Oxford, he carried out research for his PhD in Immunology at University College London. He then undertook post-doctoral research at The Oregon Health Sciences University and The Middlesex Hospital Medica

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Immunology | Immunology | Introduction to immunology | Introduction to immunology | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Recognition of extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | Defence against extracellular pathogens | T cell-mediated immunity | T cell-mediated immunity | Helper T cells and cytokines | Helper T cells and cytokines | Immunity to viruses | Immunity to viruses

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Tracking infections

Description

Professor Derrick Crook from our Experimental Medicine division tells us about his research on tracking infections Professor Derrick Crook's research consortium focusses on translating new molecular technologies and advances in informatics into the investigation of microbial transmission, diagnosis of infectious disease and identifying outbreaks of communicable disease. This research aims to translate deep sequencing of pathogens on an epidemiological scale for tracking infections, and is focussed on four different major pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA), Clostridium difficile, Norovirus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Understanding how an infection spreads is vitally important for prevention. Whole genome sequencing of microorganisms allows us to construct family trees of Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

translational medicine | infections | tuberculosis | genetics | viruses | translational medicine | infections | tuberculosis | genetics | viruses

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Evolution and pathogenicity of viruses

Description

Professor Peter Simmonds studies the epidemiology, evolution and emergence of a wide range of human pathogenic viruses. RNA viruses are major pathogens that represent the majority of new viruses emerging over time. They are particularly good at evading the host's response to infection. A better understanding of the interaction between virus and host can lead to a better control of viral infections. Recent discoveries on viral genome composition and structure might allow us to manipulate this interaction and generate new, safer vaccines. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

viruses | pathology | Epidemiology | pathogens | genome | viral infections | viruses | pathology | Epidemiology | pathogens | genome | viral infections

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT) 7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT)

Description

Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct

Subjects

virus | virus | host | host | infection | infection | protein-protein interactions | protein-protein interactions | host mimicry | host mimicry | intra-cellular trafficking | intra-cellular trafficking | host-cell machinery | host-cell machinery | signaling pathways | signaling pathways | antiviral proteins | antiviral proteins | HIV | HIV | influenza | influenza | dengue virus | dengue virus | biotechnology | biotechnology | vaccine development | vaccine development | host sensors | host sensors | IFN production | IFN production | Secreted IFN | Secreted IFN | filoviruses | filoviruses | hCMV | hCMV | IFITM proteins | IFITM proteins

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Food poisoning

Description

Identifying the potential causes of food poisoning and how to prevent contamination of food is addressed by this resource

Subjects

bacteria | viruses | mould | symptoms | carriers | prevention | legal requirements | reputable suppliers | catering | basic food hygiene | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | causes of food poisoning | staphylococcus aureus | staph | campylobacter | shingella | salmonella | escheria coli | e-coli | clostridium perfringens | listeria | bacillus cereus | hepatitis a | norwalk | haccp | nvq level 2 | oxb:200811:005pj | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | CATERING / FOOD / LEISURE SERVICES / TOURISM | N

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Hazards

Description

This resource provides information about the potential hazards and risks that are faced when preparing food

Subjects

contaminants | non- living contaminants | chemicals | living contaminants | viruses | bacteria | high risk foods | high risk people | raw meat | safe food handling practices | food handling | food storage | food preparation | daily routine | catering | basic food hygiene | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | e-coli | haccp | nvq level 2 | oxb:200811:007pj | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | CATERING / FOOD / LEISURE SERVICES / TOURISM | N

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Toxins and Viruses

Description

This resources looks at the potential risks of food contamination coming from toxins and viruses.

Subjects

Toxins | viruses | fish | shell fish | plant toxins | bacteria | hazards | mould | fungi | parasites | mycotoxin | aflatoxin | Norwalk | hygiene | personal hygiene | safe food handling practices | food handling practices | daily routine | catering | HACCP | basic food hygiene | NVQ Level 2 | oxb:200811:009PJ | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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Toxins and viruses

Description

This resources looks at the potential risks of food contamination coming from toxins and viruses

Subjects

viruses | fish | shell fish | plant toxins | bacteria | hazards | mould | fungi | parasites | mycotoxin | aflatoxin | hygiene | personal hygiene | safe food handling practices | food handling practices | daily routine | catering | basic food hygiene | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | toxins | norwalk | haccp | nvq level 2 | oxb:200811:009pj | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | CATERING / FOOD / LEISURE SERVICES / TOURISM | N

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Curated collection of Microbiology resources

Description

This is an evaluated collection of links to resources for learning and teaching subjects relating to Microbiology. This forms part of the UK Centre for Bioscience OeRBITAL project.

Subjects

ukoer | oerbital | microbiology | fungi | mycology | parasites | parasitology | viruses | virology | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Emerging_Viruses_Meeting__28

Description

Subjects

bbsrc | emergingviruses | univerisityofnottignham | conference

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Emerging_Viruses_Meeting__27

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Subjects

bbsrc | emergingviruses | univerisityofnottignham | conference

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Emerging_Viruses_Meeting__26

Description

Subjects

bbsrc | emergingviruses | univerisityofnottignham | conference

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Emerging_Viruses_Meeting__25

Description

Subjects

bbsrc | emergingviruses | univerisityofnottignham | conference

License

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Immunology basics

Description

Learning. Important Copyright Information: All images, tables and figures in this resource were reproduced from 'Lecture Notes Immunology' April 2010, 6th Edition, published by Wiley-Blackwell and with full permission of the co-author and faculty member, Dr Ian Todd. No image, table or figure in this resource can be reproduced without prior permission from publishers Wiley-Blackwell.

Subjects

ukoer | immunology | immunology basics | introduction to immunology | recognition of extracellular pathogens | defence against extracellular pathogens | t cell-mediated immunity | helper t cells and cytokines | immunity to viruses | Subjects allied to medicine | B000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol

Subjects

biochemistry | molecular biology | genetics | human genetics | pedigrees | biochemical genetics | chemical biology | molecular genetics | recombinant DNA technology | cell biology | cancer | viruses | HIV | bacteria | antibiotics | human health | therapeutic intervention | cell signaling | evolution | reproduction | infectious diseases | therapeutics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Worm threats

Description

This is an illustration of an angry-looking cartoon worm to depict the threat of worms, or self-propagating viruses, in the context of the Internet.

Subjects

business | e-commerce | viruses | worms | worm threats | internet | RETAILING | Business and Administrative studies | Mathematical and Computer Sciences | INFORMATION | Employability | Teaching | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | administrative studies | Computer science | N000 | I100 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY and INFORMATION | SALES MARKETING and RETAILING | G | C | B

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT)

Description

Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct

Subjects

virus | host | infection | protein-protein interactions | host mimicry | intra-cellular trafficking | host-cell machinery | signaling pathways | antiviral proteins | HIV | influenza | dengue virus | biotechnology | vaccine development | host sensors | IFN production | Secreted IFN | filoviruses | hCMV | IFITM proteins

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Microorganisms of Medical Importance Part 1 - Viruses

Description

An Articulate presentation giving an introduction to microorganisms of medical importance, concentrating on the viruses and describing their structure, shape and virulence. This is Part 1 of 3 related units. A help file is included and should be read first.

Subjects

microbiology | microorganisms | medicine | viruses | structure | virulence | ukoer | bioukoer | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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