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MAS.632 Conversational Computer Systems (MIT) MAS.632 Conversational Computer Systems (MIT)

Description

This class explores interaction with mobile computing systems and telephones by voice, including speech synthesis, recognition, digital recording, and browsing recorded speech. Emphasis on human interface design issues and interaction techniques appropriate for cognitive requirements of speech. Topics include human speech production and perception, speech recognition and text-to-speech algorithms, telephone networks, and spatial and time-compressed listening. Extensive reading from current research literature. This class explores interaction with mobile computing systems and telephones by voice, including speech synthesis, recognition, digital recording, and browsing recorded speech. Emphasis on human interface design issues and interaction techniques appropriate for cognitive requirements of speech. Topics include human speech production and perception, speech recognition and text-to-speech algorithms, telephone networks, and spatial and time-compressed listening. Extensive reading from current research literature.

Subjects

digital voice | digital voice | voice synthesis | voice synthesis | speech synthesis | speech synthesis | digital speech | digital speech | audio | audio | coding | coding | noise | noise | comprehension | comprehension | audio browsing | audio browsing | voice messaging | voice messaging | voice recognition | voice recognition | call center | call center | voice response | voice response | computer voice | computer voice | computer speech | computer speech | telephony | telephony | mobile applications | mobile applications | voicemail | voicemail

License

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MAS.632 Conversational Computer Systems (MIT)

Description

This class explores interaction with mobile computing systems and telephones by voice, including speech synthesis, recognition, digital recording, and browsing recorded speech. Emphasis on human interface design issues and interaction techniques appropriate for cognitive requirements of speech. Topics include human speech production and perception, speech recognition and text-to-speech algorithms, telephone networks, and spatial and time-compressed listening. Extensive reading from current research literature.

Subjects

digital voice | voice synthesis | speech synthesis | digital speech | audio | coding | noise | comprehension | audio browsing | voice messaging | voice recognition | call center | voice response | computer voice | computer speech | telephony | mobile applications | voicemail

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT) 15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT)

Description

Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures. Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures.

Subjects

telephone | telephone | Internet | Internet | communications | communications | economics | economics | business strategy | business strategy | technologies | technologies | wireless | wireless | convergence | convergence | cable television | cable television | governmental regulations | governmental regulations | public policy | public policy | evolution of technology | evolution of technology | computer hardware and software | computer hardware and software | VoIP | VoIP | data and voice traffic | data and voice traffic | network integration | network integration | deregulation | deregulation | cell phones | cell phones | WiFi | WiFi | Internet commerce | Internet commerce | spectrum auctions | spectrum auctions | telecommunications markets | telecommunications markets | competition | competition | wireless communications | wireless communications | long-distance services | long-distance services | computers | computers | satellite TV | satellite TV | telecommunications industry | telecommunications industry | regulation | regulation | technology | technology | market structures | market structures | data traffic | data traffic | voice traffic | voice traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Assessment and Diagnosis of Speech and Hearing (2010) Assessment and Diagnosis of Speech and Hearing (2010)

Description

Evaluation and diagnosis of speech and hearing is a very important topic in the therapist speech area, due to the increasing prevalence of voice disorders and hearing impairments. Thus, the curriculum for this degree includes various courses (Clinical Examination of voice and hearing, speech therapy intervention in voice disorders and hearing) that form a framework of study that enables students to develop their training professional work in this broad field (evaluation, prevention and/or rehabilitation). Evaluation and diagnosis of speech and hearing is a very important topic in the therapist speech area, due to the increasing prevalence of voice disorders and hearing impairments. Thus, the curriculum for this degree includes various courses (Clinical Examination of voice and hearing, speech therapy intervention in voice disorders and hearing) that form a framework of study that enables students to develop their training professional work in this broad field (evaluation, prevention and/or rehabilitation).

Subjects

Voice Evaluation | Voice Evaluation | Acoustic | Respiratory and Postural Assessment | Acoustic | Respiratory and Postural Assessment | Hearing Evaluation | Hearing Evaluation | Perception of voice | Perception of voice | n y Tratamiento Psicolgico | n y Tratamiento Psicolgico

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

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21W.015 Writing and Rhetoric: Writing about Sports (MIT) 21W.015 Writing and Rhetoric: Writing about Sports (MIT)

Description

"Sports, not religion, is the opiate of the people." So says David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker and a former sportswriter. Many of our heroes are sports heroes, and for many of us, sports were an important part of our childhood years. Sports are big business, even on college campuses, and they are the subject of many classic movies. In this introductory writing class we consider the role of sports in our own lives and explore the cultural meanings of sports in America. Sports have produced a large body of excellent descriptive and analytic writing; we'll read writers as diverse as Hank Aaron, John Updike, David Foster Wallace, and Malcolm Gladwell on the joys and conundrums of baseball, boxing, football, tennis, and running. The primary work of the class is improving studen "Sports, not religion, is the opiate of the people." So says David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker and a former sportswriter. Many of our heroes are sports heroes, and for many of us, sports were an important part of our childhood years. Sports are big business, even on college campuses, and they are the subject of many classic movies. In this introductory writing class we consider the role of sports in our own lives and explore the cultural meanings of sports in America. Sports have produced a large body of excellent descriptive and analytic writing; we'll read writers as diverse as Hank Aaron, John Updike, David Foster Wallace, and Malcolm Gladwell on the joys and conundrums of baseball, boxing, football, tennis, and running. The primary work of the class is improving studen

Subjects

sport | sport | writing | writing | revision | revision | baseball | baseball | tennis | tennis | voice | voice | audience | audience | essay | essay | gender | gender | race | race | mudville | mudville | NCAA | NCAA | basketball | basketball | drugs | drugs | steroid | steroid | roids | roids | rhetoric | rhetoric | ESPN | ESPN | football | football | opiate | opiate | people | people | friday | friday | oral | oral | boxing | boxing | athlete | athlete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | voice processing | voice response | speech recognition | linguistics | translation | machine learning | speech processing | parsing | syntax | language model | dialogue | comprehension | understanding | lexicon | lexical | text processing | speech generation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Shakespeare and Voice

Description

Linda Gates, Professor of Voice at Northwestern University (USA) discusses how Shakespeare's poetry and plays lend themselves to vocal performance by discussing how breath can be used to 'punctuate the thought'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | punctuation | poetry | drama | Henry V | shakespeare | voice | #greatwriters | punctuation | poetry | drama | Henry V | shakespeare | voice

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form. This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT) 21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience. This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT) 21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationshi Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationshi

Subjects

writing | writing | autobiography | autobiography | text | text | composition | composition | critical reading | critical reading | voice | voice | Exposition | Exposition | narration | narration | critique | critique | argument | argument | persuasion | persuasion | oral presentations | oral presentations | prose | prose | write | write | revising | revising | life stories | life stories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT)

Description

Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures.

Subjects

telephone | Internet | communications | economics | business strategy | technologies | wireless | convergence | cable television | governmental regulations | public policy | evolution of technology | computer hardware and software | VoIP | data and voice traffic | network integration | deregulation | cell phones | WiFi | Internet commerce | spectrum auctions | telecommunications markets | competition | wireless communications | long-distance services | computers | satellite TV | telecommunications industry | regulation | technology | market structures | data traffic | voice traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response. Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | novel | short story | short story | the city in literature | the city in literature | structure | structure | narrative voice | narrative voice | character development | character development | novelistic experimentation | novelistic experimentation | historical context | historical context | political context | political context | reader response | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT) 21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of the short story, which we will explore through reading great short stories, writers speaking about writing, writing exercises and conducting workshops on original stories. This class will focus on the craft of the short story, which we will explore through reading great short stories, writers speaking about writing, writing exercises and conducting workshops on original stories.

Subjects

short story | short story | voice | voice | point of view | point of view | character | character | place | place | plot | plot | pace | pace | conflict | conflict | want | want | obstacle | obstacle | writer's block | writer's block | workshop | workshop | incident | incident | description | description | publishing | publishing | revelation | revelation | reader | reader | writer | writer | free writing | free writing | rewrite | rewrite

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT) 21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet

Subjects

personal narrative | personal narrative | public audience | public audience | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | nonfiction | nonfiction | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT) 21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the short story. Students will write stories and short descriptive sketches. Students will read great short stories and participate in class discussions of students' writing and the assigned stories in their historical and social contexts. This course is an introduction to the short story. Students will write stories and short descriptive sketches. Students will read great short stories and participate in class discussions of students' writing and the assigned stories in their historical and social contexts.

Subjects

short story | short story | creative writing | creative writing | voice | voice | point of view | point of view | character | character | place | place | plot | plot | pace | pace | conflict | conflict | obstacle | obstacle | writer's block | writer's block | workshop | workshop | incident | incident | description | description | publishing | publishing | revelation | revelation | reader | reader | writer | writer | free writing | free writing | rewrite | rewrite

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.360J The Anthropology of Sound (MIT) 21A.360J The Anthropology of Sound (MIT)

Description

This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples — sound art, environmental recordings, music — will be provided and invi This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples — sound art, environmental recordings, music — will be provided and invi

Subjects

21A.360 | 21A.360 | STS.065 | STS.065 | CMS.710 | CMS.710 | sound art | sound art | Jacques Attali | Jacques Attali | music | music | musicology | musicology | post-modern | post-modern | recording | recording | ethnomusicology | ethnomusicology | ethnography | ethnography | soundscape | soundscape | voice | voice | audio | audio | sonic space | sonic space | science sound | science sound | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.020 Competition in Telecommunications (MIT)

Description

Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures.

Subjects

telephone | Internet | communications | economics | business strategy | technologies | wireless | convergence | cable television | governmental regulations | public policy | evolution of technology | computer hardware and software | VoIP | data and voice traffic | network integration | deregulation | cell phones | WiFi | Internet commerce | spectrum auctions | telecommunications markets | competition | wireless communications | long-distance services | computers | satellite TV | telecommunications industry | regulation | technology | market structures | data traffic | voice traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence.

Subjects

public audience | public audience | personal narrative | personal narrative | perspective | perspective | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | presence | presence | contemporary America | contemporary America | online magazine | online magazine | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT) MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester. This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester.

Subjects

Storytelling | Storytelling | human communication | human communication | representation | representation | causality | causality | live media | live media | recorded media | recorded media | computation | computation | user interface | user interface | interaction | interaction | digital media | digital media | information and story | information and story | authoring | authoring | interface | interface | computer-assisted storytelling | computer-assisted storytelling | cinema | cinema | film | film | television | television | mass media | mass media | narrative | narrative | voice | voice | information | information | story | story | character | character | dynamic situation | dynamic situation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT) 16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays | analysis techniques | analysis techniques | complex structures | complex structures | material properties | material properties | structural design | structural design | failure | failure | longevity | longevity | Energy principles | Energy principles | structural analysis | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | solid continua | Crack formation | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | failure modes | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | voice processing | voice response | speech recognition | linguistics | translation | machine learning | speech processing | parsing | syntax | language model | dialogue | comprehension | understanding | lexicon | lexical | text processing | speech generation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationshi

Subjects

writing | autobiography | text | composition | critical reading | voice | Exposition | narration | critique | argument | persuasion | oral presentations | prose | write | revising | life stories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-3 Expository Writing: Autobiography - Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

Focus: What can we believe when we read an autobiography? How do writers recall, select, shape, and present their lives to construct life stories?  Readings that ground these questions include selections from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent (pseudonym for Harriet Jacobs), "A Sketch of the Past" by Virginia Woolf, Notes of A Native Son by James Baldwin, "The Achievement of Desire" by Richard Rodriguez, The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston, and "Our Secret" by Susan Griffin. Discussion, papers, and brief oral presentations will focus on the content of the life stories as well as the forms and techniques authors use to shape autobiography. We will identify masks and stances used to achieve various goals, sources and interrelationships of technical and them

Subjects

writing | autobiography | text | composition | critical reading | voice | Exposition | narration | critique | argument | persuasion | oral presentations | prose | write | revising | life stories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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