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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | general equilibrium | externalities | Afriat's theorem | pricing | robust comparative statics | utility theory | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | revealed preference | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | increasing differences | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | government intervention | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | common property externalities | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | core | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | incentives | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Regional integration and welfare-state convergence in Europe

Description

Professor Beckfield discusses whether the welfare state convergence is really taking place, or it is just regional integration, especially in the European context. The contemporary institutionalization of a transnational regional political economy in Europe raises questions about the role of regional integration in the convergence of European welfare states. To date, sociological work has emphasized processes of industrialization and globalization as the social changes that may drive increasing similarity among welfare states. Building on neoinstitutionalist theory and the Europeanization literature, we develop the argument that regional integration drives welfare-state convergence by generating, diffusing, and enforcing the adoption of policy scripts concerning "appropriate" European so Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

regional integration | welfare state | social policy | globalisation | the European Union | welfare state convergence | regional integration | welfare state | social policy | globalisation | the European Union | welfare state convergence | 2011-06-06

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Civic Stratification and Migrants Rights

Description

Lydia Morris discusses the stratification of rights as a way to explain rights given or constrained by the state, in the migration context. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | compas | discrimination | welfare state | racism | immigration | migration | welfare | migrants rights | human rights | compas | discrimination | welfare state | racism | immigration | migration | welfare | migrants rights

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Between welfare states and markets: the migrant-policy nexus in comparative perspective and reflections on social rights and antidiscrimination law

Description

Virginie Guiraudon takes an interdisciplinary look at social and human rights and anti-discrimination laws, giving a historical, legal and sociological perspective, as well as considering the European situation. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

compas | discrimination | welfare state | racism | immigration | migration | welfare | compas | discrimination | welfare state | racism | immigration | migration | welfare

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT) 11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial? This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | how society should respond to poverty | race | race | politics of welfare | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | homelessness | crime | crime | drugs | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | social controversy | 1990s | 1990s | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | extra-marital births | extra-marital births | values | values | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | social science research | social science research | public discourse | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Prioritarianism, Levelling Down and Welfare Diffusion

Description

Lecture and discussion from Professor Ingmar Persson (Gothenburg University), the discussant is Derek Parfit (Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | welfare diffusion | philosophy | prioritanism | welfare | ethics | uehiro | welfare diffusion | philosophy | prioritanism | welfare | ethics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s Gypsy Travellers in the twentieth century

Description

Becky Taylor discusses issues of entitlement, belonging and outsiderness for Britain's Gypsy travellers in the 20th century, with a focus on housing, education and perception. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

dale farm | welfare | traveller | racism | Gypsy | predjudice | roma | dale farm | welfare | traveller | racism | Gypsy | predjudice | roma

License

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.118J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | political theory | political theory | modern society | modern society | citizenship | citizenship | women | women | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | class | class | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | power | power | culture | culture | morality | morality | gender | gender | modern life | modern life | feminist scholarship | feminist scholarship | public | public | private | private | roles | roles | civil society | civil society | political culture | political culture | WMN.412J | WMN.412J | 17.118 | 17.118 | SP.412 | SP.412 | WMN.412 | WMN.412

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.41 Public Economics (MIT) 14.41 Public Economics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, the extent of that intervention, and the response of private agents to the government's actions. This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, the extent of that intervention, and the response of private agents to the government's actions.

Subjects

public sector | public sector | public finance | public finance | regulation | regulation | social security | social security | welfare | welfare | taxation | taxation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT) 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping. This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping.

Subjects

consumer behavior | consumer behavior | producer behavior | producer behavior | welfare analysis | welfare analysis | measurement of productivity | measurement of productivity | rationing | rationing | insurance markets | insurance markets | intertemporal behavior | intertemporal behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.013J American Urban History I (MIT) 11.013J American Urban History I (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions. This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | institutions | institutions | police | police | prisons | prisons | courts | courts | city hall | city hall | political machines | political machines | reform | reform | crime | crime | public safety | public safety | public schools | public schools | education | education | welfare | welfare | railways | railways | public authorities | public authorities | housing | housing | slums | slums | hospitals | hospitals | universities | universities | 11.013 | 11.013 | 21H.231 | 21H.231

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.452 Economic Growth (MIT) 14.452 Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries. This half semester class presents an introduction to macroeconomic modeling, focusing on the theory of economic growth and some of its applications. It will introduce a number of models of non-stochastic and stochastic macroeconomic equilibrium. It will use these models to shed light both on the process of economic growth at the world level and on sources of income and growth differences across countries.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | development | development | modern | modern | world income distribution | world income distribution | Solow growth model | Solow growth model | income differences | income differences | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | optimal and competitive allocations | optimal and competitive allocations | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | overlapping generations | overlapping generations | dynamic efficiency | dynamic efficiency | growth under uncertainty | growth under uncertainty | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | neoclassical endogenous growth | neoclassical endogenous growth | capital accumulation | capital accumulation | externalities | externalities | human capital | human capital | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | expanding input varieties | expanding input varieties | Schumpeterian models | Schumpeterian models | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous skill-bias technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | endogenous labor-augmenting technological change | interdependences | interdependences | technology diffusion | technology diffusion | open economy | open economy | trade | trade

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | famly | famly | vengeance | vengeance | retribution | retribution | reform | reform | punishment | punishment | prison | prison | body | body | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.04 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (MIT) 14.04 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the following topics: basic theory of consumer behavior; production and costs; partial equilibrium analysis of pricing in competitive and monopolistic markets; general equilibrium; welfare; and externalities. It is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in economics, accounting, or finance. This course focuses on the following topics: basic theory of consumer behavior; production and costs; partial equilibrium analysis of pricing in competitive and monopolistic markets; general equilibrium; welfare; and externalities. It is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in economics, accounting, or finance.

Subjects

economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | production | production | cost | cost | pricing | pricing | competition | competition | monopoly | monopoly | market | market | equilibrium | equilibrium | welfare | welfare | externalities | externalities | costs | costs | partial equilibrium analysis | partial equilibrium analysis | competitive markets | competitive markets | monopolistic markets | monopolistic markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | producer | producer | consumer | consumer | strategy | strategy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT) 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping. This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping.

Subjects

consumer behavior | consumer behavior | producer behavior | producer behavior | welfare analysis | welfare analysis | measurement of productivity | measurement of productivity | rationing | rationing | insurance markets | insurance markets | intertemporal behavior | intertemporal behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.41 Public Economics (MIT) 14.41 Public Economics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, the extent of that intervention, and the response of private agents to the government’s actions. This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, the extent of that intervention, and the response of private agents to the government’s actions.

Subjects

public sector | public sector | public finance | public finance | regulation | regulation | social security | social security | welfare | welfare | taxation | taxation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT) 17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT)

Description

This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state. This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state.

Subjects

multinational corporation | multinational corporation | bond market | bond market | welfare state | welfare state | foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market | exchange rate | exchange rate | IMF | IMF | global economy | global economy | globalization | globalization | finanical crime | finanical crime | money laundering | money laundering | international integration of capital markets | international integration of capital markets | national policymaking | national policymaking | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | international institutions | international institutions | global governance | global governance | global finance | global finance | developing world | developing world | financial crises | financial crises | domestic politics | domestic politics | currency crises | currency crises | Paul Krugman | Paul Krugman | J. Lawrence Broz | J. Lawrence Broz | Jeffry Frieden | Jeffry Frieden | global capitalism | global capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism. In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | social capital | civil society | civil society | social networks | social networks | community norms | community norms | associational activities | associational activities | state | state | democracy | democracy | government | government | economic development | economic development | social welfare | social welfare | democratization | democratization | pluralism | pluralism | public goods provision | public goods provision | state capacity | state capacity | international politics | international politics | globalization | globalization | social sanctions | social sanctions | political participation | political participation | social movements | social movements | civic engagement | civic engagement | politics | politics | political science | political science | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social justice | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process (MIT)

Description

This class introduces students to innovative as well as classic approaches to studying U.S. government. The writing assignments will help you explore, through a variety of lenses, statis and change in the American political system over the last three decades. In the end each student will have a solid grounding in our national political institutions and processes, sharper reading and writing skills, and insight into approaching politics critically and analytically. This class introduces students to innovative as well as classic approaches to studying U.S. government. The writing assignments will help you explore, through a variety of lenses, statis and change in the American political system over the last three decades. In the end each student will have a solid grounding in our national political institutions and processes, sharper reading and writing skills, and insight into approaching politics critically and analytically.

Subjects

united states | united states | american | american | politics | politics | government | government | voting | voting | institutions | institutions | policy | policy | legislation | legislation | elections | elections | campaigns | campaigns | public opinion | public opinion | political interests | political interests | welfare | welfare | analysis | analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.552 Political Economy of Chinese Reform (MIT) 17.552 Political Economy of Chinese Reform (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on China's transition from plan to market. What has the trajectory of institutional change in China been, and how has growth been achieved? Is that growth sustainable? Subject examines specific aspects of reform (enterprise, fiscal, financial, social welfare), and the systemic consequences of interaction between various reform measures. Additional topics include the interaction between political and economic change, the transformation of state-society relations, and the generalizability of China's reform experience. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth. This course focuses on China's transition from plan to market. What has the trajectory of institutional change in China been, and how has growth been achieved? Is that growth sustainable? Subject examines specific aspects of reform (enterprise, fiscal, financial, social welfare), and the systemic consequences of interaction between various reform measures. Additional topics include the interaction between political and economic change, the transformation of state-society relations, and the generalizability of China's reform experience. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.

Subjects

China | China | China's transition from plan to market | China's transition from plan to market | institutional change in China | enterprise | institutional change in China | enterprise | fiscal | fiscal | financial | financial | social welfare | social welfare | reform | reform

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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