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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT) 21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert. This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | writing | science | science | technology | technology | communications | communications | medicine | medicine | public | public | public interest | public interest | science in the public interest | science in the public interest | education | education | literacy | literacy | science literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | craft | craft | process | process | scientists | scientists | news | news | article | article | essay | essay | write | write | read | read | composition | composition | revise | revise | revision | revision | rewrite | rewrite | archive | archive | archival | archival | history | history | history of science | history of science | history of technology | history of technology | history of medicine | history of medicine | history of nature | history of nature | nature of history | nature of history | nature of technology | nature of technology | technological history | technological history | medical history | medical history | science of history | science of history | writing history | writing history | history of writing | history of writing | writing history of history of science | writing history of history of science | interview | interview | interviewing | interviewing | publish | publish | publishing | publishing | teaching writing | teaching writing | writing teaching | writing teaching | book | book | book review | book review | writing book review | writing book review | discussion | discussion | draft | draft | drafting | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT) 21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy). Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | writing | creative writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction | fiction writing | fiction writing | writing fiction | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre fiction | genre | genre | genres | genres | fantasy | fantasy | fantasy writing | fantasy writing | science fiction | science fiction | mystery | mystery | historical fiction | historical fiction | preternatural romance | preternatural romance | horror | horror | steampunk | steampunk | workshop | workshop | revision | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT) 21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project. This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project.

Subjects

communication | communication | contemporary engineering and science professional | contemporary engineering and science professional | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | communication as organizational process | communication as organizational process | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | writing as collaboration | writing as collaboration | the writing process | the writing process | the elements of style | the elements of style | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | case studies | case studies | writing assignments | writing assignments | oral presentation | oral presentation | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.02CI Experimental Biology - Communications Intensive (MIT) 7.02CI Experimental Biology - Communications Intensive (MIT)

Description

This course is the scientific communications portion of course 7.02, Experimental Biology and Communication. Students develop their skills as writers of scientific research, skills that also contribute to the learning of the 7.02 course materials. Through in class and out of class writing exercises, students explore the genre of the research article and its components while developing an understanding of the materials covered in the 7.02 laboratory. This course is the scientific communications portion of course 7.02, Experimental Biology and Communication. Students develop their skills as writers of scientific research, skills that also contribute to the learning of the 7.02 course materials. Through in class and out of class writing exercises, students explore the genre of the research article and its components while developing an understanding of the materials covered in the 7.02 laboratory.

Subjects

scientific writing | scientific writing | technical writing | technical writing | scientific communication | scientific communication | science writing | science writing | research article | research article | title | title | abstract | abstract | introduction | introduction | methods | methods | results | results | discussion | discussion | conclusion | conclusion | laboratory research paper | laboratory research paper | 7.02 | 7.02 | 10.702 | 10.702

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.225 Advanced Workshop in Writing for Science and Engineering: ESL (MIT) 21G.225 Advanced Workshop in Writing for Science and Engineering: ESL (MIT)

Description

This workshop is designed to help advanced students of ESL and bilingual students to write clearly, accurately and effectively in a professional or academic technical environment. In class, we will focus on analyzing examples of various forms of technical writing. In addition, while 21F.225/6 is not a grammar review, we will address many of the common problems of advanced non-native writers of technical English. Class members will occasionally be the authors of the work under review. They will also occasionally be responsible for leading group discussions and for short oral presentations. The course, then, is not a grammar class nor a thesis editing service though we will spend considerable time developing student's editorial skills. Constructive partic This workshop is designed to help advanced students of ESL and bilingual students to write clearly, accurately and effectively in a professional or academic technical environment. In class, we will focus on analyzing examples of various forms of technical writing. In addition, while 21F.225/6 is not a grammar review, we will address many of the common problems of advanced non-native writers of technical English. Class members will occasionally be the authors of the work under review. They will also occasionally be responsible for leading group discussions and for short oral presentations. The course, then, is not a grammar class nor a thesis editing service though we will spend considerable time developing student's editorial skills. Constructive partic

Subjects

ESL | ESL | bilingual | bilingual | professional writing | professional writing | academic writing | academic writing | technical writing | technical writing | 21F.225 | 21F.225 | 21F.226 | 21F.226

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writing skills

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Writing Skills, including essay planning and writing, referencing, critical writing and critical reading. The OER also covers writing for science, writing reports, planning and conducting a dissertaion research project.

Subjects

ukoer | writing | writing skills | referencing | essay writing | critical reading | critical writing | writing reports | key skills | writing for science | leicester university | otter | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.225 Argumentation and Communication (MIT) 11.225 Argumentation and Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is a writing practicum associated with 11.201 (Gateway: Planning Action), that focuses on helping students write and present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing. This course is a writing practicum associated with 11.201 (Gateway: Planning Action), that focuses on helping students write and present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing.

Subjects

effective communication | effective communication | policy | policy | public | public | persuasive | persuasive | presentation skills | presentation skills | public speaking | public speaking | analysis policy analysis | analysis policy analysis | writing | writing | diagnostic | diagnostic | oral briefing | oral briefing | grammar | grammar | memo writing | memo writing | memo structure | memo structure | paragraph | paragraph | revision | revision | cogence | cogence | writing analysis | writing analysis | analysis | analysis | policy analysis | policy analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.914 Planning Communication (MIT) 11.914 Planning Communication (MIT)

Description

This three-week module, centered on a focal case, represents the second part of the Department's introduction to the challenges of reflection and action in professional planning practice. As such, it builds on the concepts and tools in 11.201 and 11.202 in the fall semester. Working in teams, students will deliver a 20-minute oral briefing, with an additional 10 minutes for questions and comments, in the last week of the class (as detailed on the assignment and posted course schedule). The teams will brief invited guests ("briefees") taking the roles of decision makers. DUSP faculty and fellow students may also be in attendance. This three-week module, centered on a focal case, represents the second part of the Department's introduction to the challenges of reflection and action in professional planning practice. As such, it builds on the concepts and tools in 11.201 and 11.202 in the fall semester. Working in teams, students will deliver a 20-minute oral briefing, with an additional 10 minutes for questions and comments, in the last week of the class (as detailed on the assignment and posted course schedule). The teams will brief invited guests ("briefees") taking the roles of decision makers. DUSP faculty and fellow students may also be in attendance.

Subjects

effective communication | effective communication | policy | policy | public | public | persuasive | persuasive | presentation skills | presentation skills | public speaking | public speaking | analysis | analysis | policy analysis | policy analysis | writing | writing | diagnostic | diagnostic | oral briefing | oral briefing | grammar | grammar | memo writing | memo writing | memo structure | memo structure | paragraph | paragraph | revision | revision | cogence | cogence | writing analysis | writing analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.225 Argumentation and Communication (MIT) 11.225 Argumentation and Communication (MIT)

Description

This Communication and Argumentation seminar is an intensive writing workshop that focuses on argumentation and communication. Students learn to write and present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing. This Communication and Argumentation seminar is an intensive writing workshop that focuses on argumentation and communication. Students learn to write and present their ideas in cogent, persuasive arguments and other analytical frameworks. Reading and writing assignments and other exercises stress the connections between clear thinking, critical reading, and effective writing.

Subjects

effective communication | effective communication | policy | policy | public | public | persuasive | persuasive | presentation skills | presentation skills | public speaking | public speaking | analysis | analysis | policy analysis | policy analysis | writing | writing | diagnostic | diagnostic | oral briefing | oral briefing | grammar | grammar | memo writing | memo writing | memo structure | memo structure | paragraph | paragraph | revision | revision | cogence | cogence | writing analysis | writing analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT) 21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on an exploration of the role that communication plays in the work of the contemporary engineering and science professional. Emphasis is placed on analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production, as well as the "how-to" aspects of writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style. Topics include: communication as organizational process, electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet, the informational and social roles of specific document forms, writing as collaboration, the writing process, the elements of style, methods of oral presentation, and communication ethics. Case studies used as the basis for class discussion and some writing assignments. Several short documents, a longer report or article, and a This course focuses on an exploration of the role that communication plays in the work of the contemporary engineering and science professional. Emphasis is placed on analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production, as well as the "how-to" aspects of writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style. Topics include: communication as organizational process, electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet, the informational and social roles of specific document forms, writing as collaboration, the writing process, the elements of style, methods of oral presentation, and communication ethics. Case studies used as the basis for class discussion and some writing assignments. Several short documents, a longer report or article, and a

Subjects

Communicating; Technical;Organizations | Communicating; Technical;Organizations | document | document | abstracts | abstracts | executive | executive | summaries | summaries | memos | memos | proposals | proposals | progress | progress | reports | reports | PowerPoint | PowerPoint | Web | Web | poster | poster | writing | writing | Communicating | Communicating | Technical | Technical | Organizations | Organizations | engineering professionals | engineering professionals | science professionals | science professionals | composition | composition | publication | publication | work management | work management | knowledge production | knowledge production | technical writing | technical writing | organizational process | organizational process | electronic communication | electronic communication | electronic mail | electronic mail | e-mail | e-mail | internet | internet | intranet | intranet | informational roles | informational roles | social roles | social roles | collaboration | collaboration | writing process | writing process | elements of style | elements of style | oral presentation | oral presentation | communication ethics | communication ethics | communicating technical information | communicating technical information | web-based media | web-based media | video | video | teleconferencing | teleconferencing | document types | document types | executive summaries | executive summaries | technical memos | technical memos | progress reports | progress reports | final reports | final reports | oral reports | oral reports

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT) 21G.104 Chinese IV (Regular) (MIT)

Description

This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X: This is the continuing instruction in spoken and written Chinese, with particular emphasis on consolidating basic conversational skills and improving reading confidence and depth.Upon completion of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with some fluency on basic conversational topics, achieve a basic level of reading competence within simplified and traditional characters learned plus common compounds, and be able to write short compositions.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu select Encoding... Auto Select... orChinese AutoSelect.Netscape (version 7.0+) on Microsoft Windows:From VIEW menu, select Character Coding...AutoDetect… Chinese.Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5.0+) on Macintosh OS 9 or X:

Subjects

chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | chinese; languge; mandarin; reading; conversation; writing; culture; china; society; custom | language | language | chinese | chinese | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | culture | culture | writing | writing | china | china | custom | custom | society | society | aural comprehension | aural comprehension | common compounds | common compounds | composition | composition | conversational fluency | conversational fluency | grammar | grammar | language laboratory | language laboratory | reading competence | reading competence | simplified characters | simplified characters | oral exercises | oral exercises | vocabulary | vocabulary | writing exercises | writing exercises | traditional characters | traditional characters | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese society | Chinese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.THA Undergraduate Thesis for Course 2-A (MIT) 2.THA Undergraduate Thesis for Course 2-A (MIT)

Description

This course is taken by mechanical engineering majors during their senior year to prepare a detailed thesis proposal under the guidance of staff from the Writing Program. The thesis proposal must bear the endorsement of the thesis supervisor and indicate the number of units planned. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is taken by mechanical engineering majors during their senior year to prepare a detailed thesis proposal under the guidance of staff from the Writing Program. The thesis proposal must bear the endorsement of the thesis supervisor and indicate the number of units planned. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

thesis | thesis | writing | writing | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | technical writing | technical writing | scientific writing | scientific writing | thesis proposal | thesis proposal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writing Skills

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Writing Skills, including essay planning and writing, referencing, critical writing and critical reading. The OER also covers writing for science, writing reports, planning and conducting a dissertaion research project.

Subjects

ukoer writing skills study skills key skills essay planning essay writing referencing critical reading critical writing writing for science writing reports | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.21W-01 Angles (MIT) RES.21W-01 Angles (MIT)

Description

Angles is an annual online magazine of exemplary writing by MIT students. All of the works published in Angles since its first edition in 2008 were written by students in the introductory writing courses. These courses, designated as CI-HW (Communications-Intensive Humanities Writing) subjects, bring together students who love to write, students who struggle with writing, students who thrive in seminar-style classes, and students who just want a chance to develop their English skills. These students prosper together and produce some remarkable work. Angles has provided them with a public outlet for that work. It also provides the CI-HW instructors with material that inspires and guides their current students. In these classes, students learn to read more critically, to address specific aud Angles is an annual online magazine of exemplary writing by MIT students. All of the works published in Angles since its first edition in 2008 were written by students in the introductory writing courses. These courses, designated as CI-HW (Communications-Intensive Humanities Writing) subjects, bring together students who love to write, students who struggle with writing, students who thrive in seminar-style classes, and students who just want a chance to develop their English skills. These students prosper together and produce some remarkable work. Angles has provided them with a public outlet for that work. It also provides the CI-HW instructors with material that inspires and guides their current students. In these classes, students learn to read more critically, to address specific aud

Subjects

writing | writing | essay | essay | exemplary | exemplary | freshmen | freshmen | online magazine | online magazine | magazine | magazine | creative writing | creative writing | literary | literary | student work | student work | example | example | communications | communications | humanities | humanities | English | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.021 Writing and Experience: MIT: Inside, Live (MIT) 21W.021 Writing and Experience: MIT: Inside, Live (MIT)

Description

During this seminar, students will chronicle their MIT experiences and investigate MIT history and culture. Visits to the MIT archives and museum, along with relevant readings, will supplement students’ experiences as source material for discussion and writing. During this seminar, students will chronicle their MIT experiences and investigate MIT history and culture. Visits to the MIT archives and museum, along with relevant readings, will supplement students’ experiences as source material for discussion and writing.

Subjects

MIT | MIT | history | history | culture | culture | writing | writing | campus | campus | graphic essay | graphic essay | journal | journal | Angles | Angles | Ilona Karmel Writing Prize | Ilona Karmel Writing Prize | library | library | freewriting | freewriting | museum | museum | workshop | workshop | archives | archives | student | student

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT) SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT)

Description

MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine. MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine.

Subjects

creative writing | creative writing | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | reading | reading | reflection | reflection | revision | revision | microfiction | microfiction | essay | essay | satire | satire | contributors' note | contributors' note | OuLiPo | OuLiPo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT) 21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates. This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | English background | American Revolution effects | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | pamphlets | correspondence | correspondence | resistance organizations | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | constitutional documents | debates | debates | colonial resistance | colonial resistance | republicanism | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.904 Seminar in Topology (MIT) 18.904 Seminar in Topology (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in topology. The main mathematical goal is to learn about the fundamental group, homology and cohomology. The main non-mathematical goal is to obtain experience giving math talks. This course is a seminar in topology. The main mathematical goal is to learn about the fundamental group, homology and cohomology. The main non-mathematical goal is to obtain experience giving math talks.

Subjects

student lectures | student lectures | math writing | math writing | topology | topology | fundamental group | fundamental group | covering spaces | covering spaces | communication | communication | oral communication | oral communication | mathematical writing | mathematical writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Professional Writing - Screnwriting, Novel Writing, Fiction, Feature Writing, Business Writing, Writing for Children

Description

Please note that these taster sessions are taken from our part-time distance learning course. The audio lectures may contain instances of tutors speaking directly to our distance learning students.

Subjects

jorumcomp10 | ukoer | university college falmouth | professional writing | children | bsuiness | features | novel | non-fiction | writing | script writing | screenwriting | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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